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Thread: Amounts of Yardage in Magazine Patterns

  1. #1
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
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    Amounts of Yardage in Magazine Patterns

    I enjoy flipping through Quilting magazines and being inspired by all the different designs, or to learn something new in terms of a technique. But I must say that when I start reading the instructions I am struck by the amount of yardage called for. My general sense is that they put in the instructions far more yardage than you need. I haven't actually FOLLOWED instructions in a magazine (yet), but really am curious about the yardage requirements. Those of you who do make quilts from patterns found in magazines, what is your sense of this? Do you end up with a lot of leftover fabric? Or are the amounts just right, and I'm imagining things? Inquiring minds want to know. Thanks!
    jillaine

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    Super Member sweetpea's Avatar
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    Jill; I real the some way. I have not use the yardage requirements in the magazine [yet] but is dose seam to me that they are add to the requirements. but maybe they are along for mistakes. it will be good to see what some of the other have to say about this.
    Scrapy quilts have more love in them.

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    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Well, the purpose of the magazine is not only to educate and stimulate the readership, but to also support their advertisers by encouraging the purchase of products. They also know that different skill levels of quilters will make these quilts, that the cutting skills are not the same, so they've allowed for lots of extra so the quilter will have enough to repeat if they make a mistake.

    And then, too, the magazines and the pattern makers know that the prints they feature will be off the shelf quickly, to be replaced by the next season's collection. So the quilters often can't get more. The consensus is, better more than enough than not enough/better to err on the side of extra!

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    Senior Member Daffy Daphne's Avatar
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    Off the subject, but I LOVE the kitty in your avatar! Would love to see a bigger photo.

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    Super Member eparys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    Well, the purpose of the magazine is not only to educate and stimulate the readership, but to also support their advertisers by encouraging the purchase of products. They also know that different skill levels of quilters will make these quilts, that the cutting skills are not the same, so they've allowed for lots of extra so the quilter will have enough to repeat if they make a mistake.

    And then, too, the magazines and the pattern makers know that the prints they feature will be off the shelf quickly, to be replaced by the next season's collection. So the quilters often can't get more. The consensus is, better more than enough than not enough/better to err on the side of extra!

    Jan in VA
    Our LQS was recently featured in a 10 Best Shops edition with an original quilt. The owner talked about the fabric requirements the magazine wanted. I was amazed at the "extra" amounts figured in but after talking with her decided that as Jan stated - with limited amounts of a run of fabric, it is better to have fabric left over than to run out if a mistake was made.
    Betty

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    I usually buy what the magazine recommend and really haven't had issues with what is left over - I use that in scrappy quilts. I would rather have too much than too little!

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    Cyn
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    Super Member Cyn's Avatar
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    Good question! Thanks!

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    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    The opposite can happen too! Wrong measurement and come up short. Frustrating! I think it is probably a good idea to not jump into a magazine project until corrections can be posted on their websites. And, there are lots of them! Lots of errors in books as well as magazines.

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    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    I am doing the labryth walk quilt from last years magazine. Beforeurchase I priced it including batting. £150 .
    I was suited and have been buying in small amounts it is getting close.
    It is amazing how much material we use in any quilt. I am always shocked by the backing amount.
    Finished is better than a UFO

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    I always check, too, to see if they are cutting width of fabric or length of fabric. Many patterns call for length of fabric when cutting borders and sashings. I have found, too, that many patterns have figured a bit extra fabric in tneir requirements. However, as I usually try to keep things simple, if a pattern calls for less than a full yard, I will round up, for example, if it calls for 2-3/4 yds, I will just buy 3 yds. I figure any extra will either get sent to my sister who makes potholders or will go into my applique fabric stash.

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    I would rather end up with left-overs than not-quite-enough - but if one is on a tight budget, it is nice to 'come out even'

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    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    Interesting discussion. As mckwilter mentioned, cutting borders from length adds a lot to the amount you need, however, we've had some discussions here that doing so sometimes makes quilts hang better. Also, it might depend on whether it's an allover pattern fabric, or a distinct up-and-down that will look very different if cut across. There is a lot to consider, and I agree that fabric really adds up, especially the backing!

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    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    I have used magazine cutting charts and there are generous cutting requirements but not so much that you would say you wasted your money. You get enough for shrinkage and straightening the fabric and then a mistake or two. I have never thought yardage charts to be overly generous.
    peace

    My friend measures every cutting requirement to the 1/4" and never buys more than she absolutly needs for a project. Then after her first mistake she runs around to every shop in the area looking for more fabric. She thinks she is being penny wise, I say.......... no scraps in her bag
    Last edited by ube quilting; 06-18-2013 at 03:28 PM.
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    I agree with most of the posts. Most of the quilts I see in magazines are disign springboards for my quilts. When I find a quilt I like, I draw it on my EQ software and go by the yardage it indicates. Would always rather have more than needed than find myself short.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post

    My friend measures every cutting requirement to the 1/4" and never buys more than she absolutly needs for a project. Then after her first mistake she runs around to every shop in the area looking for more fabric. She thinks she is being penny wise, I say.......... no scraps in her bag
    Has your friend ever figured out how much gas it cost her by running around. gas is over $3 a gallon. might be cheaper to buy an extra half or yard of it. in addition, how much is her time worth.?

    I am always kicking myself when i am short.

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    I always wait to buy my backing after I finish the quilt. Most patterns don't call for enough for my LAQ's.

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    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I don't know, but I always buy extra anyway, have been bummed too many times when I decide to make matching pillowcases or something, and can't get anymore of the fabric!
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

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    I just got a magazine and it said that the yardage for the back of the quilt (90x101) is 8-1/4 yds. That seems like a lot of fabric to me. Maybe I'm missing something.

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    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    I have found some patterns have you buy too much fabric and others you have just enough. I have done patterns where if you make a little mistake there is barely enough to fi it. I usually buy what they tell me to buy, just to be safe. I don't purchase my backing fabrics until I am ready for it. Then I use my scraps from the quilt up making a back. Sometimes There are almost enough leftovers from the quilt front. I am trying to use up some of my stash this year so I often dig in to it. I have been making some really pretty backs. Sometimes my back is just a giant version of one of the blocks from the front.

  20. #20
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
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    I always tend to 'add a bit just in case too' It really comes in handy when I get a brainstorm and go off on a tangent or decide to enlarge the quilt. I have never met a pattern that I could not make more difficult . This also gives me the chance to make an audition block of the real fabrics. There have been times that I just hate one of the fabrics once the block is put together, or that a glaring error will raise its ugly head.

    I also always measure and compare the yardage as soon as I get a kit. That is when shortages are really frustrating!!
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patski-Mi. View Post
    I just got a magazine and it said that the yardage for the back of the quilt (90x101) is 8-1/4 yds. That seems like a lot of fabric to me. Maybe I'm missing something.
    The designers might be allowing for the backing size needed if the quilt is going to be longarmed. If the actual top will be 90 x 101, the backing should be at least 98 x 109 - if one allows only four inches on each side .

    I think some longarm quilters prefer more "extra"

  22. #22
    Super Member AnnT's Avatar
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    I have found that I generally use less fabric than called for so learned to completely read the directions before starting. Altho....left over fabric can be great (depending in the money involved and the state of my stash).
    Take time to recharge your batteries. Itís hard to see where youíre going when your lights are dim. Robert H. Connelly

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    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I always make a practice block before I buy fabric for a magazine pattern as I had pattern that had a very bad mistake once. I had never had a problem with one before so I cut everything at once. It was a cat centered in a block and when I started to put it together the cat was so much longer than the block it hung over each side about an inch. I was lucky to be able to find the same fabric and cut it larger and saved the quilt. Lesson learned the hard way, there are sometimes mistakes in magazine patterns.

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    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    Funny this should come up. Just recently, I was looking at a pattern in a quilting mag (can't remember which one) when I noticed it said something like "5% extra is included in the fabric requirements to allow for shrinkage when prewashing." I guess I'd rather have scraps to add to my stash than come up a couple inches short.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eparys View Post
    Our LQS was recently featured in a 10 Best Shops edition with an original quilt. The owner talked about the fabric requirements the magazine wanted. I was amazed at the "extra" amounts figured in but after talking with her decided that as Jan stated - with limited amounts of a run of fabric, it is better to have fabric left over than to run out if a mistake was made.
    I have another question-sort of off topic but close- why are these fabric run durations so varied? I find a fabric I love and before I know it, it is no longer available and then others like the "Very Hungry Caterpillar" last forever. I made a quilt last year with a white on white dot background which I could not find in the whole world, literally. That seemed like a basic to me but NO! It was gone.

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