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Thread: The appliqued piece feels so stiff!!

  1. #26
    Senior Member Chay's Avatar
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    Mistyfuse works well but because it doesn't have any paper attached you have to have an applique pressing sheet to use with it.

  2. #27
    Super Member Fabaddict's Avatar
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    when I use fusible, I always cut out about around the center leaving about 1/2 inch. Makes for a much softer applique.

  3. #28
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    Recently I appliqued circles on to a quilt. I spray based them on and then sewed. It worked!

  4. #29
    Super Member dotcomdtcm's Avatar
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    I had the same experience. There are better fusing materials!
    It makes a world of difference!

  5. #30
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    Wish I had seen this thread a month ago. I have used the fusible "lite" stuff before and was pretty happy with it. Then I bought a different brand (which was less expensive) and discovered it was much stiffer than the other. Next time, I will audition the fusible I use to make sure I am happy with the stiffness. Unfortunately, I just have to make due with my current piece. Live and learn, right?

  6. #31
    Senior Member Bamagal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdrlinda
    Recently I appliqued circles on to a quilt. I spray based them on and then sewed. It worked!
    I had not even thought of that!!!

  7. #32
    Super Member OmaForFour's Avatar
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    I recently used Misty Fuse and it is great!

  8. #33
    Super Member OmaForFour's Avatar
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    LOVE this idea! It is the best, even better than my last entry. LOL

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamagal
    Quote Originally Posted by Cdrlinda
    Recently I appliqued circles on to a quilt. I spray based them on and then sewed. It worked!
    I had not even thought of that!!!

  9. #34
    Senior Member such a sew and sew's Avatar
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    I applique all the time. I normally use Steam a Seam lite, but I am trying Misty Fuse and it is very soft feeling, it's my new favorite. However if I was making a simple wall hanging and not a bed quilt I would use what ever I had on hand.

  10. #35
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melinda in Tulsa
    Have you tried a light weight fusible interfacing? Place fusible side to right side of appliqué fabric, sew around all edges, cut a slit in the interfacing and turn right side out. Fuse to your block then use what ever stitch you like to sew it down. Hope this helps.
    If you go to www.quiltinaday.com and clicking on media center you will find a video of Eleanor Burns show on doing just this with a sunbonnet sue and sam pattern. In addition you can buy fusible webbing that has the pattern already printed on it saving you steps. It is not expensive. I almost always use her method for appliqué projects. Eleanor also has lot s of other appliqué patterns printed on interfacing for variety.
    Also if you want to do some raw edge appliqué then just use a glue stick to hold down the appliqué and blanket stitch around it, by hand or machine. Lots of older quilts are done this way.

  11. #36
    Member spindreams's Avatar
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    I do almost all applique quilts. Once I found misty fuse, I was hooked. It is virtually weightless, and can be used on the finest, lightest fabrics. The finished block will be soft.

    I like needle turn aplique, but even then I use a little Misty Fuse to hold the piece in place. I cut the misty fuse roughly 1/4 inch smaller than the applique piece, or just put a piece of MF in the centre if it is a complex cut piece of applique fabric.

    Let us know if you try Misty Fuse or another light fusible web and it works for you.

    Jane

  12. #37
    Junior Member Grandma Libby's Avatar
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    I'm going to try the Pellon, too, then. I used another kind for just a flower applique and it was so stiff, I couldn't even get a "sharp" through the edge of it. Was going to stitch around it but it's useless!

  13. #38
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Jane,

    On the Misty Fuse, I'm wondering how solidly fused the edges of the applique are. Do you have any idea how it stands up to washing? I don't like doing satin stitch around raw edged applique because it is so slow and stiffens the applique, but I am wondering if a blind hem stitch is enough for Misty Fuse. I know that Steam-a-Seam holds up decently in the wash; if Misty Fuse does to, that would seal the deal for me!

  14. #39
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chay
    Mistyfuse works well but because it doesn't have any paper attached you have to have an applique pressing sheet to use with it.
    Use a piece of parchment paper from the grocery store or WalMart.

  15. #40
    Senior Member ajohn52's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fabric whisperer
    Quote Originally Posted by livenlearn124
    oooooooh! I like this idea, I'm going to have to give it a try.
    TY!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Melinda in Tulsa
    Have you tried a light weight fusible interfacing? Place fusible side to right side of applique fabric, sew around all edges, cut a slit in the interfacing and turn right side out. Fuse to your block then use what ever stitch you like to sew it down. Hope this helps.
    Oh yeah, I love to do this method when I need a quickie patch for granddaughter's jeans or a quick tear to mend on kids stuffs... they love the applique look, I love the ease of it! You can also use wash-away for this method, then you have just your fabric patch applique! :)
    I agree!! I've used this method for applique and it works great.

  16. #41
    Super Member Marilynsue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melinda in Tulsa
    Have you tried a light weight fusible interfacing? Place fusible side to right side of applique fabric, sew around all edges, cut a slit in the interfacing and turn right side out. Fuse to your block then use what ever stitch you like to sew it down. Hope this helps.
    You can do the same thing with used dryer sheets.

  17. #42
    Super Member gramquilter2's Avatar
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    I do a lot of applique and think the softest one is Mistyfuse. when at my LQS last week they recommended a new to me called Shades Softfuse. They said the applique will not be stiff for hand sewing.

  18. #43
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    I have made several Sunbonet Sues and Suspender Sams using, used fabric softener sheets and hand applique.
    They remain very soft and are still in use after 15 years.

  19. #44
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    I hate to hand applique - ok, I hate hand work! I use the fusible when I do applique and do all the sewing on my longarm. That said, what about cutting the fusible 1/4" in from your cutting line and then do needle-turn with a 1/8" turn under? I understand you would still have to go through the fusible if you were layering.

    I think that if you like raw-edge applique, fusible is the way to go. If you like the appliqued with little stitches or a blanket stitch, then maybe you can use little spots of fusible to hold your piece in place while you stitch them down.

    Maybe I should just keep my mouth shut since I will only do raw-edge applique with fusible!!! :roll: :lol: :oops:

  20. #45
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamagal
    I haven't done applique in a long time. I learned applique by tracing on freezer paper, cutting it out , folding over edge of paper basting then basting to the block. Pulling the paper out when finished. Since there are so many steps here, I tried fusible applique on a Sun Bonnet Sue Block. Worked great, but I realized I needed to blanket stitch arount the applique. I don't know how to applique on the machine so I had to do it by hand. It was very hard and stiff. Is all fusible applique that way. If it is, it doesn't make for a snuggly quilt. I guess I'll try needle-turn method of applique.
    You could try using lightweight iron on interfacing. I put it fabric front, to bumpy side, with qpplique drawn on interfacing. Sew carefully all the way around. Carefully trim edges to 1/8 to 1/4 depending on shape, (Smaller and clipped on curves). Gently pull fabric and interfacing away from each other, then carefully clip interfacing. Clip approx 1" slit to turn right side out. carefully finger press flat. Turn all interfacing to the back side. Place where you want it by ironing interfacing side down.
    Hand stitch or machine in place, then separate base fabric (attached to interfacing) from applique layer, Clip again, and then trim center of backing away leaving slightly less than 1/4 inch seams. Ready to quilt now. And NOT uncuddly!
    I only use plain fusible for wall hangings, etc. (Cuddly factor not needed)

  21. #46
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    The fusible stuff comes in different weights also. You just have to find one that suits you.

  22. #47
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Clip {interfacing} again, and then trim center of backing away leaving slightly less than 1/4 inch seams. Ready to quilt now. And NOT uncuddly!
    I only use plain fusible for wall hangings, etc. (Cuddly factor not needed)[/quote]

    *Edited Between { } for clarity.

  23. #48
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    If you can cut the centers out of whatever you are appliqueing, it won't be as stiff. For example if you are appliqueing something large, cut the center out of the paper before you iron it on the fabric. You would be ironing only a border onto the fabric.

  24. #49
    Junior Member ozarkmama's Avatar
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    I have tried to cut the center out of the fusible paper, but I can't seem to get it fused down before the fusing material comes off. This is especially difficult to do when the fusing material becomes separated from the pattern paper! How did you conquer this problem? I know I am not the only one with this problem. I use Steam-a-Seam Lite 2.
    Quote Originally Posted by scowlkat
    When I do fusible applique, I trace the piece, then cut out the center leaving between 1/4 to 3/8 inch of the fusible. That does help alleviate the stiffness although I don't know if it would help with hand applique. Also, I use Steam A Seam 2 Lite.

  25. #50
    Junior Member ergranny46's Avatar
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    I use Floriani Appli-Kay, it isn't stiff like some I've used.
    It sews up nicely.

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