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Thread: Ar-r-r-g

  1. #26
    Super Member TexasSunshine's Avatar
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    The Pfaff Ambition Essential is about $599 right now, I would buy one of them if I really needed a new machine, but I just bought a Nolting longarm so no more machines.
    Texas Sunshine, piney woods of NE Texas

  2. #27
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Why not look out for an old singer at cheap prices, yard sale etc. we have second hand shops which sometimes sell old machines. I have just purchased a featherweight singer to take to classes. Only goes forwards and backwards but it is light weight which is what I wanted and robust.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  3. #28
    Super Member Bluelady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I don't know who told you quilters don't use pins? I use pins all the time. And any quilter I sew with uses them frequently.
    I rarely use pins! Don't need to use them for the most part. only use them when I am adding borders on a top.

  4. #29
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    I have been looking at the Juki at allbrands.com. I recently bought a Juki serger that is wonderful. Here's a link to the page of Jukis.

    http://www.allbrands.com/categories/2512

  5. #30
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    My goodness, you have received as many comments on what not to do with your sewing machine than you have on your original question...I would look at the Kenmore. I had one for many years, before I got my Viking embroidery machine, and it would sew anything.. Good Luck..
    Kitty

  6. #31
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shawnan View Post
    I'm not sure of the model, but Pfaff has a machine on sale through December for $599. If you have a dealer close you might check with them. That seems like a reasonable price and looked like a nice machine when I glanced at it at my dealers. I'm not in the market so I didn't look very close.
    Pfaffs don't like pins,either. Ask how I know.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  7. #32
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    I use to sew over pins but no more. Several years ago I hit a pin and it broke and the point flew up and hit me just under my eye. Think about it!!!!!!!!

  8. #33
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    sorry -- but the best remedy is to remove pins before you get to them! it is dangerous and never a good idea to run over pins- regardless of what machine you are using- no point buying a new machine if you are going to continue to do the same thing over & over.
    Couldn't agree more, besides the safety issue NO machine will stand that sort of use.

  9. #34
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I use "silk" pins when I really want a seam to match. They are so thin that I have never had a problem sewing over them with my Vikng Rose. I'm a perfectionist, so I pin & pull the glass head pins right before getting to them.

  10. #35
    Super Member MaryAnnMc's Avatar
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    It's been said all ready, but I'll say it again: glue, glue, glue!!! As long as it's Elmer's washable school glue. You'll wonder why you didn't switch years ago.
    aka Chicken McLittle

    If it's true we learn from our mistakes, I'm going to be a genius!

  11. #36
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    You can throw any machine out of alignment for hitting pin. I have a Husky that is almost 20 years old and the only thing that has gone wrong with it is once the bobbin case had to be replaced. I think it would be cheaper to just pull the pins out.
    enjoy your life...it's the only one you have!!!
    Heather

  12. #37
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    My experience has been that you can sew over pins if you want, but you run the risk of throwing your machine out of time and it is expensive to have to run it to the shop (100 miles away) to get it fixed so I really try to be very careful about sewing over pins, since I have had to take my 10 year old Pfaff in twice for that very issue.

  13. #38
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    I agree with using the school glue, but I sew over pins all the time. I try to take them out, but there is always one I didn't see in there somewhere. I put the pins in so that only the point is in the seam allowance, but once in a while I have sewn right through the middle of a pin and it came out bent in half. Didn't seem to hurt my machine any. I don't remember doing that with my computerized Bernina, though. That's good. I'll try not to.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  14. #39
    Junior Member lizzieann's Avatar
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    They have Juki's on hsn.com on flex pay.
    lizziebeths.blogspot.com

  15. #40
    Junior Member helenhiwater's Avatar
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    C'mon guys

    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    sorry -- but the best remedy is to remove pins before you get to them! it is dangerous and never a good idea to run over pins- regardless of what machine you are using- no point buying a new machine if you are going to continue to do the same thing over & over.
    I only sew with pins when working with curves, and yes I do slow down unless I am in a hurry to finish a project and get excited. In this case, I was working with narrow satin ribbon which gets all goopy with glue. My Husky worked perfectly for 10 years until the last six months when I made the same mistake twice. Yard sales and the old mechanicals are a good idea. Where do you put that allen wrench?
    every cloud has a silver lining but sometimes it is hard to get to the mint

  16. #41
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I was taught early on to not sew over pins...with any machine. I have heard of many people who's machines have come out of alignment and worse because of sewing over (or into!) pins, just not a good idea. One person I know needed to get a whole new needle take up bar because of sewing into a pin. SO, if you fix the machine you have, or get a new one, please stop sewing over pins!

  17. #42
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    Janome has some great lower priced machines (they used to make the Kenmores). If you are just looking for a back up machine.

    My Janome made Kenmore is 25+ years old and still sews well.

    If you are comfortable buying a used machine, you can probably find a good solid used machine online or at a Thrift shop for $50.00 or less.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  18. #43
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helenhiwater View Post
    I have been frantically trying to finish some plush ponies for Christmas and accidently ran over too many pins with my Husquevarna AGAIN and threw it out of alignment AGAIN. ... Does any one have any suggestions for a reasonably priced machine that is still reliable? I don't care about any fancy embroidry features.
    I don't have a suggestion about a machine - except maybe for an older 301A. I have one and it works beautifully.

    My suggestion regarding sewing over pins is to sew very slowly. I've found that putting the machine on the slowest speed helps with hitting the pins. That, and I also pin my fabric pieces parallel to the seam allowance instead of across it.

  19. #44
    Super Member sewdamncute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helenhiwater View Post
    I have been frantically trying to finish some plush ponies for Christmas and accidently ran over too many pins with my Husquevarna AGAIN and threw it out of alignment AGAIN. The Husky is a great machine except for the pin issue which is starting to cost $$$ in shop visits. My fallback is my daughter's low-end Brother, which clatters like an old jalopy, has no torque for thick bunches of fabric and no thread cutter. Last time I shopped for a machine, I only found Cadillacs and Yugos, with no mid-price Toyotas. Does any one have any suggestions for a reasonably priced machine that is still reliable? I don't care about any fancy embroidry features.
    May I gently suggest you go to a sewing machine shop and get off the car lot!
    Blessed Be
    Darlene

  20. #45
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    Leaving a pin in the seam line is fine - as long as the needle doesn't hit the pin.

    I've also had a needle break on a pin while sewing a seam - and the broken part flew in my face.
    It also roughs up the needle or can bend the needle if the needle doesn't break.

    If this is an AGAIN situation - maybe sewing technique/method should be changed?

    A really really drastic solution for holding some things together - is hand basting! It does work! It does take a few minutes and it does require getting out a hand sewing needle, thread, and possibly a thimble. But for some situations, it really is an effective way of temporarily holding layers together until one can machine sew it. And there is no goop or glop to clean up later, either. And hand basting can be removed much faster than a machine stitched seam that is wrong.

  21. #46
    Senior Member Gabrielle's Mimi's Avatar
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    Berninausa are excellent, but a little pricey. Buy a "previously loved" Bernina to get the most bang for your buck. You'll never regret buying quality!
    Create with joy in your heart!

  22. #47
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    WOW what a coincidence, I have this last month treated myself to a 1100 elna 720 and this evening, still learning about it I broke a needle and had a heck of job getting it out, I found 2 broken bits of but not the larger part. OMG when as is my norm I removed the stitch plate to explore I found that the last piece had dropped into the bobbin holder, not the bobbin but in-between the bobbin and it's holder. Now if I hadn't persevered to find that last bit I could have wrecked the timing which would have destroyed the machine, phew am I pleased that I take so much care of my machine.

    I am so picky with sort of things that my machines are in great order and I have passed them onto other people in priistine condition, my advice NEVER EVER sew over pins and always make sure you have found ALL the pieces of a brokent needle.

    One of the best tools I have is a long tweezer, not the eyebrow type something similar to these http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-Nonmagne...item2a143442e1 Most of the modern machines you can't use anything magnetic on them and these really do the job without hassle or danger to the machine, just hide them from the men folk as they have so many uses for them

  23. #48
    Super Member k9dancer's Avatar
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    Get yourself a good old Singer 15 or a Japanese made 15 clone. And it's always a good idea to remove the pins, although I was taught to sew over them in the 60's when learning to sew garments. Still way too easy to break something (like yourself).
    Stephanie in Mena

  24. #49
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    i bought the viking 140c--which is essentially a rebadged saphire 855. cost me 1200-. the 835 is just under 1000-. so far, VERY pleased with the 140c. and i admit to sewing over a pin or twelve

  25. #50
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    I have a Kenmore bought new in 80's. mechanical and all metal and I always sewed clothes and over pins, no problem. I know the newer computerized machines while they sew good and have lots of stitches are not as tough as the older ones, like Grama's 201-3. Look for a good mechanical, like 201 which sews leather and drapery material really easy, even if it only sews straight forward and backward, how it sews.

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