Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 82

Thread: Argument over sewing over pins!

  1. #1
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Wales UK
    Posts
    2,035

    Argument over sewing over pins!

    I NEVER EVER sew over pins, and impress upon my pupils to do the same then I had a visit yesterday from my gentleman volunteer for Project Linus quilts, and we started discussing needle breakages, I had just broken 5 in one evening, don't ask, and he said he rarely breaks needles just on the odd occasion when he sewed over a pin and hit it!

    I was horrified, his wife agreed with me, but his reply was, what is the difference in hitting a pin and hitting a foot or the sewing plate, you know when you have the wrong one in!

    I didn't have an answer, do you?

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    howell, Mi
    Posts
    2,343
    All the needles I have are the right ones for all 3 of my machines. I used to sew over pins, but the damage to the machine isn't worth it. One problem with sewing over pins is sometimes the needle isn't broken just bent. That could upset the timing on your machine. I have had the needle and the pin break and go into the hole in the sole plate. Lucky not to have any damage but a terrible time getting the pieces out. Not worth it, IMHO.
    Sue

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    5,063
    Blog Entries
    1
    I used to sew over them all the time and rarely had a problem. Then I got my Kenmore and if I sewed over a pin it would break the thread at the very least. I got tired of rethreading the machine so I started taking them out. I had a teacher who said no, you are not supposed to sew over them but also said if you put them in at an angle they won't hit the needle. I try to put my pins in now at an angle just in case I forget to take one out. The only time I can't put them in at an angle is when I'm piecing and I need for two seams to match up. The biggest difference in hitting a pin, or foot or the sewing plate is that the last two cost more to fix or replace. Hitting a pin can cause your needle to bend and then ruin your plate; it's just not worth it.
    Judy

  4. #4
    Super Member CindyA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,245
    Well, when you hit the foot or plate you know something is not right. You've got the wrong part in, have it in wrong, something's not lined up properly. When you hit the pin you've deliberately left something in the way. I occassionally leave a pin in and usually don't have a problem. But, honestly, it's usually because I'm being lazy. If I really want to leave the pin in to make sure I get the stitch in the correct place I sew really slowly and take the pin out immediately before the needle goes in the fabric. Many years ago I sewed over a pin and it broke the needle and thread. I tiny part of the needle flew up and into my eye. It stayed down in the pink part of my eye-where you pull the skin down under the eye (if that make sense). I wore contact lenses and was used to putting my fingers in my eyes so I was fortunately able to get it out without too much trouble. I still prefer to wear my glasses when I sew, just in case!

  5. #5
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,748
    I use very long (and thin) pins so I can insert them so the tip of the pin falls short of where the needle will hit. That said, sometimes I insert one a bit too far and it's far enough that the needle may glance off of it. I've never broken a pin or needle from hitting a pin.

    On the Sally Collins video she sews over pins all the time and said that machine speed is the difference between sewing "over" pins and breaking/bending them. I noticed she uses the same long thin pins I use.

    So possibly just slowing the machine down is the answer, coupled with very thin pins.

    I typically run my machine at a fairly slow speed unless I'm FMQ'ing. I think that is a product from my 7th grade Home Ed teacher yelling "quit racing those machines!!".
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    I sewed over a pin ONCE, needle broke in two and hit my glasses....it I had not been wearing glasses at the time, the broken needle would have gone into my eye. Since that day I have never sewn over a pin, it is not the damage to the needle, or sewing machine or whatever, what about your own personal safety !!!!!!!
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  7. #7
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    My Mom would shutter if she knew how many times I have sewn over pins. Its my single worst habit. But I do at least slow down when approaching a pin.
    In my defense , there are times when matching up a really tough area.. its just seems like the best method to keep it all exactly in place till its stitched.

  8. #8
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    My rule for sewing over pins is sometimes I sew over pins, sometimes I take them out. I never break my rule. LOL
    Got fabric?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crosby,Texas
    Posts
    837
    I would think possible cost would be the difference. If you mess the timing up there you go. Now if you break a pin and it flies in your eye I would think that could cost you a fair amount too.I guess it's like this. Why do something that could cost you when it's easy,and no skin off your tail to avoid. You are going to have to take them out at some point anyway,why not then?

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Orbiting
    Posts
    1,442
    I only leave the pins in when I can't get it to stay in the right place any other way. In those instances, I slowly sew a stitch length away from the pin/pins, then hand crank the machine over it that way if it does hit a pin it's barely touching it and can be moved enough to sew past it.

    A lot of times I will pin to the left of the needle so that I can pull the pins back some without totally removing them.

    The only time I broke a needle was when I was free motion quilting and ran over a safety pin. I took the machine apart and did a good cleaning and oiling. Then started relying more on spray basting rather than pin basting.

  11. #11
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    5,873
    Sometimes hitting the presser foot or needle plate is BECAUSE the needle has previously hit a pin and bent.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  12. #12
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,734
    Blog Entries
    5
    I find I pin quite a bit when I am lining up seams and I don't pull out the pins. I have never bent nor broken a needle or pin. I think it must be because I go slow. I always forget to pull the pins out before I reach them. I've been doing this for years.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  13. #13
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    12,715
    He asked what is the difference, and I would say none - both are to be avoided!

    That said, I sometimes leave in the pin and sew VERY slowly, so slowly that if the needle starts to hit the pin I can tell whether it's going to hit head-on or slide to the side. And I'm glad that my old eyes need glasses, because they have provided protection more than once when I hit the needle plate. (Usually that happens right after I clean the machine. During cleaning I accidentally change the machine's setting to zigzag. I hate it when that happens!)

  14. #14
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    44,538
    Blog Entries
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by bellaboo View Post
    my rule for sewing over pins is sometimes i sew over pins, sometimes i take them out. I never break my rule. Lol
    lol lol
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
    T – is it True? H – is it Helpful? I – is it Inspiring? N – is it Necessary? K – is it Kind?


  15. #15
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Canadian in Minnesota
    Posts
    2,358
    I have the same rule as Bella Boo - when garment sewing and easing in a sleeve, where there might be a pin every quarter inch, then I sew over it. Verrrry slowly. When I'm piecing a quilt, I rarely pin at all.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  16. #16
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,282
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    My rule for sewing over pins is sometimes I sew over pins, sometimes I take them out. I never break my rule. LOL
    You're so cute!!
    That's my rule too, and I also never break it.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  17. #17
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Asheville, Lake Vermilion, Tarpon Springs
    Posts
    1,086
    Blog Entries
    27
    Even when quilting, there are times when I need to ease in a little, especially when attaching borders. Not able to keep that precise 1/4" after all these years. Even if those long pieces start at exactly the same size, the feed dogs have a tendency to feed the lower fabric at a slightly quicker pace. Not enough to matter, except over five feet it does make a difference. I'm with Dunster's--slow down approaching the pin and see if it will hit it or not. Take it out if you must.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.

  18. #18
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,489
    Quote Originally Posted by QultingaddictUK View Post
    I NEVER EVER sew over pins, and impress upon my pupils to do the same then I had a visit yesterday from my gentleman volunteer for Project Linus quilts, and we started discussing needle breakages, I had just broken 5 in one evening, don't ask, and he said he rarely breaks needles just on the odd occasion when he sewed over a pin and hit it!

    I was horrified, his wife agreed with me, but his reply was, what is the difference in hitting a pin and hitting a foot or the sewing plate, you know when you have the wrong one in!

    I didn't have an answer, do you?

    My machine doesn't act up if I sew over pins. I try not to, depends on the item. On a set in sleeve------believe me, I'll sew over the pin, don't have enough hands NOT to.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  19. #19
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,329
    Blog Entries
    1
    i don't really see an *argument* situation here- simply a difference of opinion- but i would state that SAFETY should always come first- and to deliberatly leave pins in (hoping) that you will never hit one is not practicing safety.
    I hit a pin once that broke my needle- one piece of the needle flew up & hit the center of my glasses- and actually stuck in the lens! if i had not had my glasses on i may have lost that eye...scared the crap out of me! i never ever leave in pins now--and teach everyone i am helping to never ever leave them in (& for some people i recommend safty glasses )
    it's bad enough to break needles because of a mechanical problem- its just plain unsafe to leave things in the way on purpose risking injury---it's all fun til someone gets hurt!
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  20. #20
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,913
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    My rule for sewing over pins is sometimes I sew over pins, sometimes I take them out. I never break my rule. LOL
    I like your rule!!! I admit I sew over my pins. Occasionaly, I will hit one and bend it. I've had to get my pliers out to remove it from the bobbin area. I think speed and pin placement has a lot to do with it. I waver back and forth and sometimes I do remove the pins as I am sewing to it. I have a friend in Florida that is a new quilter and when he was here in August, I was helping him work on finishing his first quilt. I did stress to him that he shouldn't sew over the pins, that he should remove them. (Do as I say, not as I do!!) Old habits are very hard to break!
    No one has ever become poor by giving. - Anne Frank
    Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    http://www.etsy.com/shop/TheQuiltedPig

  21. #21
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,648
    I never sew over pins. Why ask for trouble?
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place. We are nearing closer to the End Times.

  22. #22
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Wales UK
    Posts
    2,035
    IMO there is an art to pinning, and I chose to use a complete lesson, what is to me, the correct way to pin. This is of course just "my" way but it works. When piecing I pin frequently but at about 1/2" or a tad more from the edge, that way the newbies can concentrate on sewing and not worry about the pins as the presser foot will miss them, as they get a bit more practise they do as I do and remove the pins as they come to them or just ignore them As far as bindings or something similar, like appliqué, I use the long flower head pins and put them in at right angles which makes them so easy to remove as you come to them,

    A tip when a needle breaks and you can't find all the bits, turn your machine on it's side, unscrew and take off the bottom plate and with a torch explore all the parts underneath the bobbin workings, you will find a pair of tweezers will help get the pesky bit out. It's worth the effort as twice I have found it lodged in one of the gears!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  23. #23
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Yakima, WA
    Posts
    2,481
    I encourage my students to remove the pins, but I saw how frustrating it was for the beginners to remove the pin and have the fabric slip out of place so decided to invest in the sharp, thin silk pins and leave it up to their discretion. As they get better at sewing, I notice they frequently remove the pins. We've only had one broken needle in 5 years. The silk pins bend easily and we end up tossing a lot of them, but it's worth it.

    I have to admit, I sew over my pins more often than not, but I use the silk pins as well. I do rely on the thicker pins when sewing on a thicker fabric, then I absolutely do remove my pins.
    Thought for EVERY Day: You know all those things you've always wanted to do? You should go do them.

  24. #24
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30,987
    I pin horizontally so if I accidentally sew over a pin, it is usually okay. I do try to remove the pins as I come up to them when sewing. I have bent one before and even managed to sew though the flower top of a pin. Luckily I didn't knock off the timing and I try to be careful. What I really love(not) if when I switch to a fancy stitch and forget to switch to the fancy foot attachment. It sure scares me When the needle hits the solid foot and snaps, Yikes!!!

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    kannapolis, nc
    Posts
    391
    I broke one of my machines when I accidentally sewed over a pin I didn't remove. I didn't see the pin but I heard it when my needle hit it. The machine had to be repaired, luckily it was still under warranty.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.