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Thread: Awhile back

  1. #1

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    a lady here said that she was machine quilting her king size quilt on her regular machine. I am ready to do my queen size on my regular machine and was wondering how you squeeze all the quilt to go thru that small hole on the machine? I think if I roll it up all the way to one side it will not fit. Should I roll half at at a time and work to the right so it will roll out to the left, then turn it around and do the same to the other half. It is sitting in a bag at this time so haven't tried either method as yet. Guess I am a little scared because have only done wall hangings in the machine. :-(

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Some roll, some use tools that hold these rolls in place, some just puddle the quilt around the table... basically what ever works best for you :wink:

    The main thing is to keep the quilt up and on the table as much as possible, so it doesn't drag down on the area that you are working on.

    Placing an additional table to the side or back of the sewing table can be a big help too :D:D:D

  3. #3
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    Here's a neat website that might answer some questions for you:

    http://www.daystyledesigns.com/quiltingsetup.htm

    I've got 3 I need to get busy on myself.

  4. #4

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    i have quilted king-size quilts. just roll up the fabric on in inner side and squish it through. it is quite a production but it really isn't any more difficult than quilting a double. it is quite heavier so you will need a large table to hold all the quilt to your left. the quilt i did was a wedding quilt for my daughter and her hub. i would rather make the whole quilt from start to finish rather than have someone else do the work. plus, i don't want to spend money on that, rather spend it on fabric!!! if you use cotton batting like warm and natural, the quilt top and back "sticks" to the batting more so than the poly blends, so that helps with the not bunching part.

  5. #5
    Super Member Connie in CO's Avatar
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    I rolled,sometimes used pins.I did what ever it took to get the quilt under the arm

  6. #6
    Super Member maine ladybug's Avatar
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    I roll it from both sides to the middle. Then start in the middle and unroll as needed. I do some on one side, then turn it and do some on the other side. I always sew some in the ditch first to help hold the quilt more securely. I sometimes use the open type hoops made to hold the fabric too.

  7. #7
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Thanks for the topic. I'm getting ready to tackle MQ :)

  8. #8
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    I quilt all my quilts, from table runners to queen size quilts on my Elna 7200. I don't roll personally, I find it too hard to maneuver that bulk. I "puddle" my quilt around the area I'm quilting and I have so much more control and a lot less tugging that way. If you have never visited Diane Gaudynski's site, here's the link:http://www.dianegaudynski.net/

    She does all her quilts on her home machine and gives lots of great hints, tips and advice on her techniques. Good luck! :-)

  9. #9
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    I am getting ready to start quilting the attached in the next couple of days. It is a double quilt.

    This is how I set up my quilt. I have done a king size and it is a bear, but it is doable.

    I have a table in front of my sewing machine, against the wall, and have my sewing table against the wall to my left.

    I am just now getting my sewing room set up, no curtains/drapes yet. I will show pics when I get it done.
    JulieM

    Edited to add: my machine has a 9" throat space
    Attached Images Attached Images



  10. #10
    Kas
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    I puddle, too. And I start in the middle and work my way out on one side, then switch and do the same thing for the other side.

    JulieM, your Kwik Klip tool looks like a cigar! I was laughing when I figured it out!

  11. #11
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    Keep reminding yourself that it gets easier when you get the center done and have less under the arm.

  12. #12
    Super Member maine ladybug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by susiequilt
    Keep reminding yourself that it gets easier when you get the center done and have less under the arm.
    And don't forget to take lots of breaks. It's hard work and you need to stand up and stretch from time to time.

  13. #13
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    I've done Queen's and a king. Luckily my old Pfaff has an almost 8" throat. I used every way possible! I scrunched, I rolled, I folded, I tucked it under my chin, I pushed, I pulled! Nothing fancy, but managed SID around all these sunflowers.
    This wonderful old machine does not have a walking foot and I can't (yet) do FMQ.

    A huge job but, boy, was I proud!
    "Easy" way? Doesn't exist. Just had to keep asking myself, "Would I rather do it all by hand?"

    My only hint: See if it will be possible to do the center bits first!

    Can't wait to pay off my lay-away Pfaff Exp 3.00 next month with its large throat. Got it for just this reason.

    PS: the first picture shows when I first set it up all nice and organized. Didn't stay that way long!

    I can do it!
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    Nighty-night DD
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  14. #14
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I have done a stitch in the ditch on the dinky under $100 Brother for a king sized quilt. I did what many above have done. Start in the middle and work out. I tried rolling (too much work) or puddling, which worked better. I did have to pull it through sometimes, but it didn't affect the finished product. I didn't even have a walking foot back then! That cheapy Costco machine keeps on trucking.

  15. #15
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Quilting in sections is another option. Marti Michell has an excellent book on it. It's much easier to do nice SID or FMQ if you don't have to fight the bulk and weight of the entire quilt.

  16. #16
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Just be sure to start in the middle and quilt next to quilting, with practice you will figure it all out and be amazed how good you can get.

  17. #17
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I bunch mine and when is that big I always start in the center. The only reason for that is that I keep telling myself "this is the most difficult part. It can only get better from here".

  18. #18
    Super Member quilterella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kittycats
    a lady here said that she was machine quilting her king size quilt on her regular machine. I am ready to do my queen size on my regular machine and was wondering how you squeeze all the quilt to go thru that small hole on the machine? I think if I roll it up all the way to one side it will not fit. Should I roll half at at a time and work to the right so it will roll out to the left, then turn it around and do the same to the other half. It is sitting in a bag at this time so haven't tried either method as yet. Guess I am a little scared because have only done wall hangings in the machine. :-(
    I bunch, I scrunch, I push and I pull. I have tried rolling and using those bicycle clip-things, but I always end up scrunching, bunching and pushing and pulling!

  19. #19
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    I also use my ironing board to help with some of the bulk. I set it up next to me on the left with the little part right above my lap. It helps a lot. I also throw some of the quilt over both shoulders if necessary but basically, do whatever works to get it under and through the machine. All 3 of mine are Brothers so there isn't much of an opening to work with! A walking foot is my best friend. Good luck!

  20. #20
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    I'm a puddler. I tried rolling like a lot of the quilting books say, but I found the roll to be too stiff. My machine has a standard throat and my very first machine quilted quilt was an "almost" king size. I start in the middle as well. Take a deep breath and give it a go...you can do it!

  21. #21
    Senior Member kwilter's Avatar
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    The easiest way to do a large quilt at home is to turn your sewing machine so that the needle end is in front of you and the cords are in the back. Then you can more easily move your quilt under the needle. I've also found the quilt gloves work well to grasp the quilt. :-D :-D :D

  22. #22
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlienQuilter
    Here's a neat website that might answer some questions for you:

    http://www.daystyledesigns.com/quiltingsetup.htm

    I've got 3 I need to get busy on myself.
    I checked out this website and it has some good information, esp. techniques on handling the quilt and the diagram for your work space. Sometimes I roll half the quilt up, sometimes I just squish it up under the machine, depends on if I'm doing SID or FM. I NEVER use pins because I spray baste!!!
    I didn't know about the Cheater Needles and if (and only if) I were to enter a quilt for judging I would use them, good tip. I use the slider, can't FM w/o it. Haven't had a problem with bobbins acting up but the teflon thingies would be helpful if that was an issue. One thing I do NOT use are the gloves, they are just inconvenient. I do, however, use glycerin. Just put a drop or two on your finger tips and palms and you get all the tacky you need and it washes off easily. A $3-$4 dollar bottle (any pharmacy) will last you three lifetimes (maybe 4). :lol:

  23. #23
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    I puddle my quilt and have done both king and queen sizes with little trouble at all. Rolling is such a pain, because you have to roll and unroll so much

  24. #24
    Super Member sidmona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    Some roll, some use tools that hold these rolls in place, some just puddle the quilt around the table... basically what ever works best for you :wink:

    The main thing is to keep the quilt up and on the table as much as possible, so it doesn't drag down on the area that you are working on.

    Placing an additional table to the side or back of the sewing table can be a big help too :D:D:D
    What Amma said. That's how I've done it and I've done a few king size ones.

  25. #25
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    Anything larger than a double, I cut the batting in thirds so all you have is the top and backing (no batting) to stuff under the arm of the machine. Look for instructions on the net for doing this. Another option is QAYG blocks. Clear as mud!
    http://creativeribbons.blogspot.com/...as-you-go.html

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