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Thread: Bias Binding... Why?

  1. #1
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    I'm trying to work on my binding skills and I wanted to know why is it important to use bias strips for binding? Why shoulding we use a strip cut on straight of grain?
    Thanks~

  2. #2
    Super Member needles3thread's Avatar
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    I use straight of grain for binding unless the quilt has curved
    or un-straight edges.

  3. #3
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    sometimes bias cuts make it more interesting, like if you're using stripes

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I used to use bias for everything becasue that's what my mom told me. Now I just use it for curved edges & use wof strips for everyting else. Cutting selvedge to selvedge provides enough stretch to handle any issues.

  5. #5

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    As a general rule I use bias binding on bed quilts, or quilts that will be getting a lot of use. It is more durable. If a thread or two breaks in bias binding, only a small part of the binding is affected. With straight binding - a broken thread or two can run the entire length of the quilt and really comprise it. Straight of grain binding, however, is good for smaller quilts, wall hangings and such as it will help the quilt keep it's shape and durability isn't as much of a concern.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Happy Quilting!

    Dave

  6. #6
    Super Member JenniePenny's Avatar
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    Hi Mona,
    It's fine to use straight edging if your quilt is square or rectangular. Bias binding is the way to go if you have a quilt with scalloped edges, or a circular tree skirt, or something with curves.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by needles3thread
    I use straight of grain for binding unless the quilt has curved
    or un-straight edges.
    Same here. Aside from curves and striped fabric, it's really just a matter of choice if you want bias binding or not. Some swear by it, others couldn't be bothered with it. I personally have never had a problem with straight grain binding and most all of my quilts are heavily used utility quilts. So just do what you like and that will be perfect for you! :D :D

  8. #8
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    I like to use bias on everything when sewing over the joining seams on bias you don't have to go over 2 layers of seams.

  9. #9
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by needles3thread
    I use straight of grain for binding unless the quilt has curved
    or un-straight edges.
    Me too

  10. #10
    Super Member quilttiludrop's Avatar
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    Either doubled straight grain binding (for straight edges only) or bias-cut binding (with adequate batting to fill it to the fold) are very durable.

  11. #11
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    When I was learning to quilt, I was told to use the bias binding technique. The last quilt I made I used the straight grain binding, and it turned out very well. Bias should be used when there are curves otherwise it might not lay flat.

  12. #12
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramie bj
    I like to use bias on everything when sewing over the joining seams on bias you don't have to go over 2 layers of seams.
    You can join straight runs of binding with a diagonal seam which will do the same thing if I'm understanding you correctly.:)

  13. #13
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    Thanks everyone. I do use straight of grain for bindings using a diagonal cut to join my strips. I understand the need for bias when binding curves, not that I have done a curved binding yet. I just finished binding a quilt I'm going to list for sale. Look for it...I'm calling it "Spring Flowers"

    Thanks again!

  14. #14

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    Have to agree with the majority of the others, only need to use binding on curves or if the binding is striped, for a special effect. All my other bindings are straight.

  15. #15
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    I dont really bind. I make the back big enough to pull around to the front. One machine stitching, mitered corners, done, no missed places in back. Have only made straight rectangle quilts tho.

  16. #16
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    Quote Originally Posted by Gramie bj
    I like to use bias on everything when sewing over the joining seams on bias you don't have to go over 2 layers of seams.
    You can join straight runs of binding with a diagonal seam which will do the same thing if I'm understanding you correctly.:)
    Thanks for explaining. I wasn't getting that.

  17. #17
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    You don't have to use bias binding. It just curves more easily if you have scalloped edges. I always use the straight grain for my binding, doubled over. It is stronger and easier to cut.

  18. #18
    Super Member sidmona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by needles3thread
    I use straight of grain for binding unless the quilt has curved
    or un-straight edges.
    same here

  19. #19
    Super Member DeeBooper's Avatar
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    When you cut on the diagonal to make your binding strips, it lets the fabric stretch so it works very well on curves like for scallops or bags. You do not need to cut on the bias for straight edges of quilts. Hope this helps you.

  20. #20
    Power Poster Homespun's Avatar
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    I agree with most of the replies. I use wof binding unless the edges of the quilt are curved!

  21. #21
    Senior Member yonnikka's Avatar
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    Bias gives the quality of stretchyness. This is very useful if you are a wee bit short on fabric for your binding, such as if you make a slight mistake in measurements. The bias allows you to coax, for example, a 3 ft piece of binding to ft an edge 3 ft 3 inches in length.

    The stretchyness allows you to bind around curved corners, scalloped edges, or a round quilt (mug rug or table runner) easily and smoothly.

    Matching patterns: if your binding has a printed recognizable pattern, cutting on the bias allows short pieces to be matched and connected with less attention to whether or not that print is recognizable. On a small piece, a too-bold, too distinct pattern on your binding could be a distraction.

    These are my reasons. I've used straight-grain binding with both success and frustration. When I'm working on a very stable, perfectly squared quilt, then straight grain binding is okay.

  22. #22
    Member patcummings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MzMcKee
    I'm trying to work on my binding skills and I wanted to know why is it important to use bias strips for binding? Why shoulding we use a strip cut on straight of grain?
    Thanks~
    Traditionally, other ways were used to bind quilts, including straight bindings. Bias bindings wear better and longer and it is easier to make a nice mitered edges at the corners. Aesthetically, they are more appealing to me. They just take more fabric to construct and require a little more skill to apply.

    Patricia Cummings, quilt historian/ certified master craftsman in quilting

  23. #23
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    When making a quilt for competition, what would a judges critique be on bias vs straight?

  24. #24
    Super Member Iamquilter's Avatar
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    I only use bias binding on quilts with curved edges, otherwise its straight grain binding and have never had problems with them wearing.

  25. #25
    Super Member mimee4's Avatar
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    I use straight, length of fabric rather than WOF and I connect it with bias seams. Works great, although I haven't done any curved edges.

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