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Thread: binding on birthed quilt

  1. #1
    Super Member Wonnie's Avatar
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    binding on birthed quilt

    Have no idea why this suddenly popped into my head but I'm curious as to whether you can "birth" a quilt and still use binding (???)

    Could (or would) you use polyester batting, Warm and Natural, cotton/polyester blend, etc?

    And could you knot it instead of " quilting" it?......before or after applying binding?

    What prompted this line of thought were several UFO's that I'd like to finish up and I hand quilt so this would be much quicker. Even though I take a lot of time and care with my piecings, I'm still, at heart,a utilitarian quilter. I like to enjoy the fruits of my labor

  2. #2
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    You could bind a birthed quilt, but all the seam allowances there would make it very bulky. I think I would cut the edge off as narrowly as possible if I were going to add a binding.
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  3. #3
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    If I'm going to bind a quilt, I would not go through the work of birthing it.
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    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatPitter View Post
    If I'm going to bind a quilt, I would not go through the work of birthing it.
    I wouldn't either. I always thought one of reasons you birthed a quilt was so you didn't have to bind it.
    Patrice S

  5. #5
    Super Member Wonnie's Avatar
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    True , cashs_mom, I do know that but I still want to know if anyone has done it and how it turned out. Granted there would be a lot of bulk if polyester batting would be used but if a very thin batting were used I think a binding would be possible and decorative. I, also, was thinking to tie it by machine tacking or by using big stitch quilting.
    Anyone out there tried this?

  6. #6
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wonnie View Post
    True , cashs_mom, I do know that but I still want to know if anyone has done it and how it turned out. Granted there would be a lot of bulk if polyester batting would be used but if a very thin batting were used I think a binding would be possible and decorative. I, also, was thinking to tie it by machine tacking or by using big stitch quilting.
    Anyone out there tried this?
    What I don't understand is why you would birth the quilt if you were going to use binding? Why not just sandwich it and then bind it?
    Patrice S

  7. #7
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    I've "tied" a quilt by using the 'grommet' stitch on my machine. Worked great!

    But I also don't know why you'd bother to bind if you birthed a quilt. Seems like a lot of extra work to me! (I actually find birth-style quilts to be a hassle; they always end up a little baggy somewhere.)

  8. #8
    Super Member Wonnie's Avatar
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    Well, I DESPISE basting, both thread and safety pins. And I love doing bindings so I'm trying to find an alternative. I'm of the persuasion that just because something hasn't been done doesn't mean it can't be. Am grateful for any input.

  9. #9
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    *why not make a smaller product and try binding it? I would like to see how/or know how it turns out.

  10. #10
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    I would tie it and then do the binding. I have done this in the past and it worked good

  11. #11
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wonnie View Post
    Well, I DESPISE basting, both thread and safety pins. And I love doing bindings so I'm trying to find an alternative. I'm of the persuasion that just because something hasn't been done doesn't mean it can't be. Am grateful for any input.
    I don't baste. I use 505 spray and am going to try glue basting. I'm just finishing a king sized quilt done by Quilting in Sections. I had spray basted the sections and then life got in the way and I wasn't able to quilt them for weeks. They were still just fine to quilt.
    Patrice S

  12. #12
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    When I use the birthing method I don't also bind it. I do press the edge and stitch about 1/4" to 1/2" from the edge.

    There is no reason you couldn't bind them, just use a wider seam allowance and wider bindingso you don't have to sew through so many layers.

    Quilting would also be from the center out in if doing traditional stitching.
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  13. #13
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I have never birthed a quilt, so I'm speaking from complete ignorance, but isn't it just as much work to properly birth a quilt as to prepare a quilt sandwich?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I have never birthed a quilt, so I'm speaking from complete ignorance, but isn't it just as much work to properly birth a quilt as to prepare a quilt sandwich?
    My Mom made lap quilts for the nursing home by "birthing them" and then they were tied. The middle layer was an old sheet or flannel. She stitched them about half an inch from the edge after they were turned. These were about 36 x 45 inches in size.

    I think I tried to do one once - and it was very hard for me to get the top and bottom nice and smooth.

    For a larger quilt, I think it would be less of a hassle to layer it in the usual way, tie it or whatever to hold the layers together, and then bind it.

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    A few years ago when quillows were the rage, I made a boatload for gifts.....I found if I cut the backing 1/8" shorter all the way around, when I birthed it, it was snug. I do that for small things, if I'm going to birth and it has kept my stuff from sagging.....but I didn't bind, just stitched around edge about 1/4".....

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    After birthing it,I like to do a stitch about 1/4 " around it for a finished look.

  17. #17
    Super Member Wonnie's Avatar
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    You brought up an interesting point, Bear in re to middle layer. Flannel would be thin but warm and, I THINK easy to quilt through if I go that route (unless someone tells me it's NOT easy. In re to sheet, others have said not easy to quilt, BUT, it comes to mind I could use something as thin as batiste (do they still make it???) and make a summer quilt or a tiablecloth.

    Guess I'm not understanding why birthing a quilt is so much of a hassle so I must be missing something (?????) It seems like you just have to sew around all the outside 3 1/2 sides, trim the corners and turn it.....right? or wrong? I don't know.....since it takes me 4 hours or longer to tape the backing to the floor, add the batting and crawl around the floor to baste it every 3" to 4" it HAS to be quicker (and easier on my old decrepit knees).....doesn't it?

    It seems like it should end up pretty square when you turn it if you measured through the centers to get the measurement for your borders....right?

    Taking all your advice and concerns as they come in.............


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    Last edited by Wonnie; 06-13-2017 at 06:49 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wonnie View Post
    Well, I DESPISE basting, both thread and safety pins. And I love doing bindings so I'm trying to find an alternative. I'm of the persuasion that just because something hasn't been done doesn't mean it can't be. Am grateful for any input.
    In my experience, birthing a large quilt doesn't avoid pinning. You still would want to keep the layers aligned, even if you are just knotting.

    As others have said, it would be harder to bind a birthed quilt, because of the extra bulk. If you really want to do this,I would suggest trimming off the outer edges after tying/quilting but before binding to make it easier to handle. Binding a birthed quilt isn't an approach I would take, but that certainly doesn't mean it wouldn't work!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wonnie View Post
    Guess I'm not understanding why birthing a quilt is so much of a hassle so I must be missing something (?????) It seems like you just have to sew around all the outside 3 1/2 sides, trim the corners and turn it.....right? or wrong? I don't know.....since it takes me 4 hours or longer to tape the backing to the floor, add the batting and crawl around the floor to baste it every 3" to 4" it HAS to be quicker (and easier on my old decrepit knees).....doesn't it?
    Have you tried taping the backing to a wall instead of the floor? I basted one quilt crawling on the floor... I was in my 20's at the time, but I still knew it wasn't for me, and haven't done it since!

    Also look at spray basting, glue basting, or Sharon Schamber's board method for basting at a table. I think that any of these would work better than what you're suggesting.

  20. #20
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    Do you have any place you could use a large table for basting? Church? Recreation hall? Library? It is easier if you have a helper for lining up the three layers. Once they layers are lined up, the helper can go away.

  21. #21
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    Maybe try a 'small' quilt 10 x 10 or 20 x 20; birth it and bind it; see how it works for you - then let us know.

  22. #22
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    I glue-baste my quilts up on a folding table. No tape, no pins. It's quick, and easy on the back and knees! I can even do parts of it from a rolling chair if I'm having a bad back day. Gravity does some of the work, the glue does the rest. I will never baste a quilt on the floor again!

    I've always struggled with birthed quilts so I stopped doing them. I always had something baggy, somewhere - but maybe I just wasn't very good at that method. I like Geri B's suggestion to have the backing just a titch smaller than necessary, that might have helped me. Although sometimes the bagginess was on the top, so maybe not!

    When I did a birthed quilt, after sewing the edges together (before flipping it) I'd take my applique scissors and trim excess batting away right up to the seam to help make the edges less bulky. Time-consuming, but made the edges look a lot better IMO. If you're thinking of adding binding, this would help reduce some bulk, too.

    There's really no "wrong" way - I don't think I'd ever do what you're talking about but that's absolutely not a reason why you shouldn't run with your idea! I think it's great you're experimenting, and maybe you'll come up with a style that is uniquely your own.

  23. #23
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    I am not sure why you would want to bind a birthed quilt. When I make one, I do a row of decorative stitching in about an inch to form an 'edge'. If you want to bind it, you would probably need to do a wide binding to capture all the bulk of the seams.

  24. #24
    Super Member Wonnie's Avatar
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    For those who mention bagginess once quilt is birthed.......did this happen around the area you left open in order to turn the quilt ?

  25. #25
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    My opinion is if someone births a quilt then puts binding on that it's a total waste of time to birth it.....actually I'd say you'd just be wasting fabric.......birthing a quilt is usually done because they don't want to do binding......I attempted birthing a quilt a few years ago and had a mess so no more of that for me. I usually bind with just straight strips no mitered corners.


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