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Thread: Binding question

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    I am ready to bind my quilt. Problem is I am either going to have to piece it several times or cut it across the grain. Will it hurt to do that? I hate to piece it so much. Help!

  2. #2
    Junior Member karen924's Avatar
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    mamajack,
    Is this a bed quilt or a wall-hanging. If its a wall hanging do whats easiest. If a bedquilt, it really should have bias binding.....yes piecing
    karen

  3. #3
    Super Member CoventryUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karen924
    mamajack,
    Is this a bed quilt or a wall-hanging. If its a wall hanging do whats easiest. If a bedquilt, it really should have bias binding.....yes piecing
    karen
    Why bias???? I always do mine straight, never had a problem! Only do bias if I am binding curves!

  4. #4
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Binding is often pieced. You just need to piece it on the diagonal; doesn't show as much. There are Youtube videos on how to do this.

    I use straight-grain binding on most of my quilts, no problem. The only time I use a bias binding is if there are curves.

  5. #5
    Senior Member pjaco's Avatar
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    I just finished my easy strip quilt with flange binding. Check it out in tutorials.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Binding is often pieced. You just need to piece it on the diagonal; doesn't show as much. There are Youtube videos on how to do this.

    I use straight-grain binding on most of my quilts, no problem. The only time I use a bias binding is if there are curves.
    I agree.

  7. #7
    Power Poster erstan947's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoventryUK
    Quote Originally Posted by karen924
    mamajack,
    Is this a bed quilt or a wall-hanging. If its a wall hanging do whats easiest. If a bedquilt, it really should have bias binding.....yes piecing
    karen
    Why bias???? I always do mine straight, never had a problem! Only do bias if I am binding curves!
    Me too:)

  8. #8
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    Piecing a binding on straight or bias for quilts without curves is like asking if the chicken or the egg comes first. :) its really up to you. Just my opinion.

    But the tutorial here:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-29275-1.htm

    Is great! I don't sew binding by hand and this has been a real help for me.

  9. #9
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    I only use bias when the edges are curved. That is never. I did hear once that bias binding wears longer. Don't know if that is true. I think it is all up to you, but straight is easier to work with and the joining seams are 42 inches apart so you don't have so many.
    Sue

  10. #10
    Junior Member karen924's Avatar
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    I'm redo-ing the binding on an antique quilt and it wore out right along the seamline, it was straight pieced. While I do tend to use bias, I also use poly/cotton thread to piece. Its an oxymoron. My quilts will rip up before the binding wears out. I don't like quilt police and promise I will never check your binding if you promise not to check my thread....LOL

  11. #11
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    All the above posts are right on target. Either bias or straight grain is okay.

    One thing to check before you actually sew binding on is to lay it on the quilt edge and check where your seams lie. You don't want them to end up at a corner so you may have to shift the binding one direction or another to accomodate this. I know from that little thing called experience!
    peace :D

  12. #12
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    Just a question....what would happen if a person cut the binding on a slight angle, not bias, not straight? I don't know the answer, just wondering about better wear than straight cut.????

  13. #13
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    I do not cut on the bias. I just cut across the grain. I made a quilt for my son for preschool. It has been run through the washing machine and dryer every friday for 2 years and dragged around and folded a million times at the preschool. Still looks great! The only thing that is deteriorating slightly is the store bought iron on applique.

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewecansew
    Just a question....what would happen if a person cut the binding on a slight angle, not bias, not straight? I don't know the answer, just wondering about better wear than straight cut.????
    You could do this. It would be cutting on the bias, but not on the true bias, so you would still have some of the difficulties associated with bias strips -- i.e., stretching.

    Bias binding really is stronger than straight-grain binding. This is because the exposed edge, which gets the most wear, has multiple threads bearing the strain with a bias cut. On a straight-grain cut, the stress at the edge is being born by just a few strands of thread running the entire length of the binding.

    However, straight-grain binding is easier to handle and to attach to a quilt without getting distortion or stretching. That is one reason why so many of us use straight-grain binding. My quilts are not heirloom-quality quilts designed to be handed down for generations in my family, so I don't care if the binding wears out a little sooner; if someone still wants the quilt by that time, they can replace the binding.

    Whether cutting binding on the grain, off the grain, or on the bias, it helps a *lot* to heavily starch the fabric before cutting the strips. Starch stabilizes fabric so there is much less chance of getting distortion or stretching while applying the binding.

  15. #15
    skippitydodahquilts's Avatar
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    I've done several scrappy bindings and I do the 'Disappearing Triangle' technique shown here -

    http://www.heatherbailey.typepad.com...ing/index.html

    Click on the link "Enter Gallery" for instructions.

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