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binding question

binding question

Old 03-25-2021, 12:20 PM
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I always pin the start of my binding to the quilt, then take it all the way around the quilt, not pinning but just going around to make sure none of the seam joint fall on a corner. Does anyone know of a way to do this without going all the way around the quilt(I am working on a king size now) Thanks
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Old 03-25-2021, 12:38 PM
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I do this as well lol. I an sure mathematically it could be figured out. You would need to know how many inches you used on your first piece, if you do bias joins how many inches long the join is etc. By the time you do all that I think it is just easier to do it the way you were describing.
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:09 PM
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Thanks. I just wondered if anyone had a better way to do it. Maybe I could to it if I had a degree in trig. or geometry or maybe just the patience to try to figure it out. LOL But you are right. It would probably take less time to do what I am doing. Thanks again, have a great day!
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:15 PM
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Thereís probably a formula out there. If you know your approximate quilt size you could add all 4 sides together, build in say 3 inches for each corner and a foot for joining. Or thereabouts. I make lots and lots of binding and then save the leftovers for a scrappy binding when I need it.
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Stitchnripper View Post
Thereís probably a formula out there. If you know your approximate quilt size you could add all 4 sides together, build in say 3 inches for each corner and a foot for joining. Or thereabouts. I make lots and lots of binding and then save the leftovers for a scrappy binding when I need it.
It was when I was using a scrappy binding like you are describing , Stitchnripper that I realized it was going to be impossible to avoid a binding seam at the corners. Since then i realized that it doesnít matter if that happens. I can still mitre the corner satisfactorily so I donít spend the time auditioning the binding before I sew it on to the quilt.
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:43 PM
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Yes I found the same. It doesnít really matter in the grand scheme of things!
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:47 PM
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I use an Elmer's Purple School glue stick to baste my binding on. As I approach a corner, I check for that seam and if it looks like it's not going to make it past the corner an inch or so, I open the folded binding and cut it diagonally a few inches before the border and then again right after the seam that's going to be problematic. I sew them together and continue on around the quilt. Very fast fix.
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:51 PM
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I'm math nerd, and there's no trig required to figure this one out. You just need to know your quilt length and width and the distance between each of your seams on your binding. (I'm assuming that your binding is made up of uniform length strips.)

Here's an example with a 90" x 92" quilt and a binding made up of 42" strips.

Quilt size: 92 x 90
Distance between binding seams = 42

Start on 92" side.
Distance from corner: 40 (See note)
Seam 1 position: 40 + 42 = 82 (92 - 82 = 10 from next corner) (this seam is on the first side)
Seam 2 position: 42 - 10 = 32 (90 - 32 = 58 from next corner) (this seam is on the second side)
Seam 3 position: 32 + 42 = 74 (90 - 74 = 16 from next corner)
Seam 4 position: 42 - 16 = 26 (92 - 26 = 66 from next corner) (this seam is on the third side)
Seam 5 position: 26 + 42 = 68 (92 - 68 = 24 from next corner)
Seam 6 position: 42 - 22 = 20 (90 - 20 = 70 from next corner) (this seam is on the fourth side)
Seam 7 position: 18 + 42 = 60 (90 - 60 = 30 from next corner)
Seam 8 position: 42 - 30 = 12 (92 - 12 = 80 from next corner) (this seam is on the first side)
Seam 9 position: 12 + 42 = 44 (92 - 44 = 48) (this strip will over lap the start of the binding by 4")

Note: The 40" in this example is the distance from the *final* corner to be bound and the start of the binding strip. Meaning that you are binding away from that corner. Those 40" are the last section to have the binding sewn on.

I'm willing to do the calculations for you with your exact quilt. You just have to tell me:
1) the length and width of your quilt
2) which side you will start binding on
3) how far from the final corner to be bound the start of the binding will be placed (40" in the example)
4) how far apart the seams are in your binding
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Old 03-25-2021, 03:08 PM
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Walking the binding around the quilt to make sure a seam doesn’t land in a corner is way easier then doing math.
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Old 03-25-2021, 03:10 PM
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I usually walk it around but have done it with quilt folded. i trust myself better when i go around it though. checking seams to not have them in the corners.
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