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Thread: Birthing (or pillow casing) a large quilt HELP!

  1. #1
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    Birthing (or pillow casing) a large quilt HELP!

    DEAR QUILTERS,

    I have birthed small quilts but have a large 7'x8' quilt I'd like to birth rather than bind due to the special nature of the quilt (the center (about 5'x6') is loose and right now ocean waves are glued, waiting to be sewn down after it is turned, leaving each wave loose at its crest... we'll see how it works). I promise to share (my friend Beckycraft will post pictures for me) if I get enough help to get this quilt finished!

    After searching both under pillow casing and birthing I did not find that anyone had remarked on using this method on larger quilts. I'm not uptight about every inch being just so, but I don't want to mess up a quilt which my new DIL (its for her and her new hubby, our son) helped me design, either. Is there a reason for not birthing large quilts other than a microscopic imperfections? I can't reason why this might be a problem. I have wide enough tables (4 pushed together) to lay it out and make sure it is smooth on both sides before quilting. DH will help me to keep it as stabilized as possible.

    But still, I really need to know why no one wants to birth a big quilt. After birthing it I know it will be harder to reach inside and make sure each corner is OK, but I figure if I do each corner and pin it down as OK, then I will be able (with DH's help) gently pull the quilt edges (I'd start at the bottom and work toward the opening, gluing just enough through the top to the batting). Then I would turn it over and go over the back and glue through the back to the batting. I always quilt near the edge for stabilization. Then I'd be ready to quilt the whole thing. Each element of the quilt will be quilting according to the quilt top's pattern. The back will not have the "ideal-for-it" quilting showing, but that isn't an issue for me.

    If you wonderful quilters of QB would give me input of WHY you don't do birthing on large quilts then I feel like I'll have a better chance of being successful. Thank you for reading this and double thanks for helping me out!!!

  2. #2
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Maybe you can get some ideas here.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...s-t140101.html

  3. #3
    Super Member nannyrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
    DEAR QUILTERS,

    I have birthed small quilts but have a large 7'x8' quilt I'd like to birth rather than bind due to the special nature of the quilt (the center (about 5'x6') is loose and right now ocean waves are glued, waiting to be sewn down after it is turned, leaving each wave loose at its crest... we'll see how it works). I promise to share (my friend Beckycraft will post pictures for me) if I get enough help to get this quilt finished!

    After searching both under pillow casing and birthing I did not find that anyone had remarked on using this method on larger quilts. I'm not uptight about every inch being just so, but I don't want to mess up a quilt which my new DIL (its for her and her new hubby, our son) helped me design, either. Is there a reason for not birthing large quilts other than a microscopic imperfections? I can't reason why this might be a problem. I have wide enough tables (4 pushed together) to lay it out and make sure it is smooth on both sides before quilting. DH will help me to keep it as stabilized as possible.

    But still, I really need to know why no one wants to birth a big quilt. After birthing it I know it will be harder to reach inside and make sure each corner is OK, but I figure if I do each corner and pin it down as OK, then I will be able (with DH's help) gently pull the quilt edges (I'd start at the bottom and work toward the opening, gluing just enough through the top to the batting). Then I would turn it over and go over the back and glue through the back to the batting. I always quilt near the edge for stabilization. Then I'd be ready to quilt the whole thing. Each element of the quilt will be quilting according to the quilt top's pattern. The back will not have the "ideal-for-it" quilting showing, but that isn't an issue for me.

    If you wonderful quilters of QB would give me input of WHY you don't do birthing on large quilts then I feel like I'll have a better chance of being successful. Thank you for reading this and double thanks for helping me out!!!
    This sounds like something I,d like to try. After turning it inside out, do you top stitch around it or just press or something else? Thanks in advance.
    so many quilts to make, so little time.

  4. #4
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    I've never tried this method, but I don't see why it wouldn't work. Your idea of pinning it flat around the corners as you go, sounds good. Are you going to do a detailed quilt design on it? (I must say, it's a strange name for a technique.)

    ~ Cindy

  5. #5
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    are you going to tie the quilt?? machine quilting one that was turned isn't easy to me. others have done it but i'd get wrinkles or folds in the backing i'm sure. good luck.
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
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  6. #6
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    I use that method all of the time on my Linus quilts. I leave the whole bottom open and then turn it. I tuck those two pieces inside and then pin baste the whole thing. I quilt it by using a fancy stitch and variegated thread. I quilt about every 4 inches vertically across the width of the quilt. I then finish it by stitching about an inch away from the edge all the way around. That secures the bottom opening shut and creates a false binding. I never machine quilt anything larger than crib size as I am a hand quilter but I don't see why it wouldn't work.

  7. #7
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    My main problem with birthing any quilt is, I can never get the top and back to stay lined up perfectly after the sandwich is turned right side out. ( Back puckers and the edge seam not exactly along the edge)It sounds like you want to birth the quilt and then apply Elmer's washable glue to bast the quilt through the opening? I have never tried that so you will have to tell us how it works if you decide to do it. I think it might be easier to spray inside it with 505 because you can peel it up and reposition it if needed.


  8. #8
    Senior Member RV Quilter's Avatar
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    Birthing a large quilt can be done. I find it easiest if you have two people doing it. Pull out corners, lay flat and place an occasional pin throughout quilt. I then use the same method as for smaller quilts closing the opening with pins and go around the whole border and pin or use clips to get joining seam to lay flat. Then I use a decorative stitch around the whole quilt and use same stitch to do some "quilting" to hold the quilt together. Just a little more bulk to work with.
    Dreams Do Come True
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  9. #9
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    Oh, you wonderful quilters are coming through! I intend to "pin" it with glue by making as sure as possible that everything is even and then putting a spot of glue and pushing it down with something like the end of a wooden spoon... something that will push the glue through the fabric and into the batting. I'll have time to double check before it dries.

    And I intend to quilt the top according to the pattern and let it go where it goes on the back. The backing pattern is pretty complex so I don't think it will show up as tooo odd.

    I hope more suggestions keep coming!

  10. #10
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    We make charity quilts and tie them. We've done up to a queen. It takes a couple people to manage the process but it can be done. We use a yardstick from the inside to distribute the batting. I don't know as the sandwich would be smooth enough for actual quilting, however, works OK for tying
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  11. #11
    Senior Member bigredharley's Avatar
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    I have a king sized log cabin all "birthed" and ready to SITD. I've never had a problem with doing it.
    ​Nancy

  12. #12
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i've birthed a full sized. to be honest, i like the binding better. on the birthed one, i felt like i had to sew an even seam just inside the edge... would just as soon spend the sewing on binding.
    Nancy in western NY
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  13. #13
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I have birthed many twin sized quilts for charity for tying. It is difficult to keep the layers smooth, but with tying you have more "wiggle room" than with quilting. I would think that it would be a fight to keep the layers from shifting. Even a small amount of shift becomes a problem when there is nowhere to go with it because of the outer seam. Let us know if your gluing method works.

  14. #14
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    Eleanor Burns "quilt in a day" log cabin book shows how to birth a large quilt.

  15. #15
    Super Member willferg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpspeedy2 View Post
    I use that method all of the time on my Linus quilts. I leave the whole bottom open and then turn it. I tuck those two pieces inside and then pin baste the whole thing. I quilt it by using a fancy stitch and variegated thread. I quilt about every 4 inches vertically across the width of the quilt. I then finish it by stitching about an inch away from the edge all the way around. That secures the bottom opening shut and creates a false binding. I never machine quilt anything larger than crib size as I am a hand quilter but I don't see why it wouldn't work.
    This was my idea, too to leave the whole bottom open instead of just a hole. It will make the turning easier and let you smooth out and pin the rest of the quilt before sewing that last side closed.

    I use the birthing method all the time, but sometimes it doesn't lie flat, no matter what I do...
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