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Thread: Birthing a Quilt

  1. #1
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    Birthing a Quilt

    When you birth a quilt, then sew around the edge of the quilt, is it possible to still quilt it or is it better to tie it? If you quilt it (hand or machine) wouldn't the fabric "bunch" up and not lay flat?

  2. #2
    Super Member Lori Peercy's Avatar
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    Good question, I am waiting with you for the answer.

  3. #3
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I have done the birthing method and then quilted straight lines after - you just have to make sure it it laying flat/smooth before you start quilting , just like you would if you were doing regular quilting
    To keep your mind fresh- learn one new thing a day !

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    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    I like the birthing method except when it doesn't lay flat when turned. Realized that I can't do it with a flannel/poly mix!! He He! Way too stretchy. Have a couple of WIPs that I need to take apart and do something else with.

  5. #5
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    I have never been able to get a birthed quilt to lay as perfectly flat as a regular binding quilt. Maybe others are more talented than me. When I did this method, I carefully smoothed the layers after turning and still had some slack for some reason and believe me I cut and layered carefully. I finally pinned it as best as I could and machine quilted SITD from the center out in all directions stopping about 2 inches all around the edge. This left the edge puffy and it wasn't too noticeable that it wasn't perfect. Maybe others can give you better ideas if they have had more success.

  6. #6
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    OK..back to basics!! What is a birthed quilt?? After 9 kids not sure if I want to try one tho!

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    As careful as I could be was unable to lay my birthed quilt flat had to tie it.
    Merivale
    Australia.

  8. #8
    Super Member JanTx's Avatar
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    A birthed quilt is one that you layer with right sides together, sew around all 4 sides - leaving a gap to turn through, then turn it right side out and finish the gap you used to turn it.

    I also quilted these from the center out. My quilts done this way are a bit puffier, but ... for my stage at the time ... they worked. I did them because I was scared of finishing them any other way. Now ... at a later stage ... I think they are more trouble - and harder to get right - than the other way!
    So many quilts, so little time.

  9. #9
    QM
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    Pat, a birthed (or envelope, or pillowcase) style quiltis one where you make a sandwich of batting, backing then top, with the last 2 right sides together. You sew most of the way around the outside, turn it right side out, then sew up the part of the edge you left open.

    Notes: It is important to have a fairly stable batting (I use thermore, which is VERY stable). The batting and backing should also be well pressed with starch or sizing, which also stabilizes the whole thing. After I turn it right side out , and have sewn the opening, DH and I 'play tug of war'. We pull the whole thing on each diagonal and pull it firmly lengthwise. This seems to help get the 3 layers to grab each other. I then pin baste quilte well before quilting. If I am going to do complex FMQ, I first do a basting stitch along the center in each direction for additional stability. Otherwise, I quilt centerlines and work out from there. I have wrists that give me trouble if I tie, so I never do.

  10. #10
    Senior Member QuiltingCrazie's Avatar
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    I can't get them to lay flat either I did a quick one with a panel for a birthday, turned out pretty good but it was small I have never tried that on a quilt bigger then a baby size. Good luck and I would love to see it finished. What size is it? Look at a tutorial too I have seen one from E Burns but then she makes everything look easy lol I would love to see some of her OOPS quilts just to know it happens to everyone!!
    *Rachel*

  11. #11
    Senior Member nycbgirl's Avatar
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    I use the birthing method on some quilts and I quilt them and they don't lay flat but neither do the ones that I bind! I quilt for the fun of it not for perfection. I give my quilts to those who don't look for the flaws and there are plenty!

  12. #12
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info!! I may try that with a baby quilt ...I learn something new every day!!

    Quote Originally Posted by QM View Post
    Pat, a birthed (or envelope, or pillowcase) style quiltis one where you make a sandwich of batting, backing then top, with the last 2 right sides together. You sew most of the way around the outside, turn it right side out, then sew up the part of the edge you left open.

    Notes: It is important to have a fairly stable batting (I use thermore, which is VERY stable). The batting and backing should also be well pressed with starch or sizing, which also stabilizes the whole thing. After I turn it right side out , and have sewn the opening, DH and I 'play tug of war'. We pull the whole thing on each diagonal and pull it firmly lengthwise. This seems to help get the 3 layers to grab each other. I then pin baste quilte well before quilting. If I am going to do complex FMQ, I first do a basting stitch along the center in each direction for additional stability. Otherwise, I quilt centerlines and work out from there. I have wrists that give me trouble if I tie, so I never do.

  13. #13
    Senior Member pinkberrykay's Avatar
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    I just did one for a charity quilt and used the zig zag stitch to quilt straight lines through the quilt. Turned out great!!!

  14. #14
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
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    I birth a lot of my quilts - have done as large as 72 x 72. They stay flat (I do starch the back and I use Warm and Natural or Warm and White batting and I do press them) and i have not ever had trouble FMQing even with some fairly complex patterns. I have the Baby Lok Quilter's Pro and I just drop the feeddogs and go.

  15. #15
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    I wouldn't recommend it for larger than a twin size...I use this method on lap quilts and baby quilts all the time.
    I have only had one real stinker that wouldn't lay flat at the edges...so I put binding on it to cover the issues.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  16. #16
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
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    I'm a newbie. What is "birthing a quilt?

  17. #17
    Super Member Floralfab's Avatar
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    I have "given birth" to many quilts. After I have the sandwich made I pin it flat as you would when getting ready to machine quilt a top. I then sew around the edges leaving space to birth the quilt. Remove pins and turn right sides out. Stitch opening. Lay it flat again and pin and then I go ahead and machine quilt it and have had no problem with bunching. Hope this helps.

  18. #18
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweeterthanwine View Post
    When you birth a quilt, then sew around the edge of the quilt, is it possible to still quilt it or is it better to tie it? If you quilt it (hand or machine) wouldn't the fabric "bunch" up and not lay flat?
    Thanks everyone for your helpful hints. I will be doing this on a baby quilt that is not too large. Hopefully will be able to post a picture of the finished quilt by September.

  19. #19
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweeterthanwine View Post
    When you birth a quilt, then sew around the edge of the quilt, is it possible to still quilt it or is it better to tie it? If you quilt it (hand or machine) wouldn't the fabric "bunch" up and not lay flat?
    I tack all my smaller quilts---------because I hate hand quilting. I also hate the term "birthing". I'm old and to me it's just turning a quilt inside out. Most of my baby and personal sized quilts are turned inside out.
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  20. #20
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddysmom View Post
    I'm a newbie. What is "birthing a quilt?

    A fancy way of saying you've turned the right sides out--------as in inside out-----------when you sandwich a quilt with right sides together and sew around the edges except for a small opening to turn the quilt.

    I've birthed three kids and "birthing" a quilt just rubs me wrong.. Chalk it up to me being old and grumpy.
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  21. #21
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    I have only ever tied a quilt when using this method....too much scope for disaster to attempt machine quilting (well for me anyway).
    Last edited by earthwalker; 04-09-2012 at 09:12 PM.

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