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Thread: Brand new quilter needing elementary advice!

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen S View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZdgpQ49xGM

    There are some really good videos on youtube that show how to cut fabric and for beginners.
    I totally agree - a picture is worth a thousand words. Like having a teacher at your fingertips. If you don't understand one there is always another.

  2. #27
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    Love the quilt you picked out! Everyone less has given you their ideas. Just have fun. Don't rush!
    SueDor

  3. #28
    Senior Member Judi in Ohio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by betsyjohnson View Post
    Hi everyone- I just started quilting recently. I used to sew with my mom when I was a kid, but only clothing. I have a quilt picked out as my first quilt that I'm going to make, and I already have all the fabric for it... But I'm already stuck. I know this seems like a very elementary question, but I just need some good tips. I need to cut out 112 pieces of my white fabric for the background, but I can't figure out the best way to cut my fabric! I mean, I can cut 112 pieces individually, but that sounds awful! I can't figure out the best way to fold my fabric to minimize cutting time. I just feel like every time I fold my fabric I'm going to cut it wrong!
    Any advice would be very much appreciated! Thanks in advance!
    OK, my elementary advice is to stop! Go to YouTube and find beginning quilting and watch everyone you can. Especially if it teaches you how to use the rulers and rotary cutters. Quilting is different from other sewing. Your quilt pattern you chose is adoreable and will be simple to make and teach you a lot in the process. You will be cutting 6.5 strips and 3.5" strips, but you have to learn how to hold the ruler and cutter to get correct widths. Also you must practice the 1/4" seam - seems simple yes? Not so simple, it is the one thing that is the hardest to master - believe it or not. You need to learn to crawl before you walk. Also, quilting books - go to the library. I needed a beginner quilt class, for some reason I need to see it. Using the rulers is also different and you need to learn to do it right or you pick up bad habits - ask me how I know that? I was also a clothing sewer when I started. Anyway, enjoy, and take your time.
    Judi in Ohio

  4. #29
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by betsyjohnson View Post
    Yes, I do have a rotary cutter and a mat, and two different sized rulers. This is the pattern I'm making:http://www.freshlemonsquilts.com/?p=1016
    It seems like it shouldn't be too bad for a beginner!
    That does look like a great pattern to start out with as a beginner. The most challenging part, I think, will be the quilt assembly. Since there are so many different blocks, and the order of assembly is so important. I'd suggest you pin little pieces of paper to each block as you finish it, with the letter written on the paper.
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  5. #30
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    What a great pattern! I'm going to go back and play on that site, since I've never run across it before. I agree with the others; take it slow and easy, cut a little at a time, and you'll be fine.
    Mistakes are just opportunities to invent a new quilting technique!

  6. #31
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    I would strip piece the blocks. You may not know how to do this, but it saves a lot of time. Cut 6.5" strips of the dark and 3.5" of the white. Sew them together, then cut with a rotary cutter into 6.5" pieces. Cut 3.5" strips of the light fabric and 6.5" strips of the white. Sew together, then cut into 3.5" pieces. Then you would sew these two sections together. Just have to keep up with how many of each color you need. Welcome to the Quilting World!!

  7. #32
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    Welcome Betsy. Your pattern looks just right for a beginner. In addition to some really fine advice others have written, I would recommend going to the library and raiding the quilting books. You need a good basic book that shows lots of how-tos. Check out what your library has and then purchase one or two that seem to make the most sense to you. And keep coming back here. We are all full of advice.

  8. #33
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
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    You have been given lots of good advice. I will add another piece of advise. If you starch your fabric (I STARCH VERY stiff, like a board) your fabric will stay in shape and I believe you'll see the difference in working with starch versus without starch. Good luck.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  9. #34
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Good luck, the pattern lay out looks OK, but I never do a whole quilt cutting at first, do enough for one or 2 blocks only. This allows me to see if I realy want to do the whole thing and to check for my cutting quality.
    Freedom is costly and quilting keeps us busy...

  10. #35
    Senior Member Gabrielle's Mimi's Avatar
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    As the teacher of the Learn To Quilt series at my LQS, I can't encourage you enough to take a beginner's quilting class. It will save you lots of time and money in the long run, plus it will prevent you from developing bad habits (like not closing the rotary cutter "safety" after each cut!). You can also purchase beginner's quilt books. Alex Anderson has a very elementary one, and Harriet Hargrave has a series of 4 which are more detailed. Take advantage of all the resources that are out there! Good luck.
    Create with joy in your heart!

  11. #36
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    My advice is to either take a basic quilting class from your local quilt shop or you could go to youtube.com and type in "beginning quilting instructions" There are many videos you can watch and get some good tips. It is like having you own personnal instructor. Eventually, you will be quilting and use the best tips suitted for yourself.

  12. #37
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    I haven't read all of the posts yet, but I don't want to lose my trend of thought. So please forgive me if I repeat anything someone else has said. That picture looks like a D9P (disappearing nine patch)to me. You can google D9P and find great tutorials on the block. It's one of my favorite blocks....so many ways to make variations. And as someone said, a great block to start with. And yes, I do cut as I go. First one block at a time and after I'm sure I've got the block right, then I cut a row at a time -- never the whole quilt. I've cut the whole thing before and found that I over cut so much then I had to find things to make with what I had already cut. I'd rather have my leftovers in one piece. Good luck. Let us see it after you've go the top together.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  13. #38
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    Brand new quilter: If you don't have a "mentor" close by that can come over and help you, go to your LQS and take a rotary cutting class. I struggled for three years trying to learn how to correctly cut my quilt pieces and things weren't ever as good as I wanted them to be. After I took a class, things began to fall in place. There are also many many tools out there you can buy that quilters have designed to help cut certain patterns. Those are all good and I own some but there is nothing like being able to cut with a standard mat, rotary cutter and basic ruler.

  14. #39
    Senior Member emlee51's Avatar
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    Reading through the pattern, this looks like a disappearing Nine Patch quilt, but since you are new to quilting, cutting as you go, and making the block would be more practice for you. I would also make just one block, as I do for all my quilts, just to see how it goes for you. I always buy extra fabric just for those "goofs". I also make my practice block out of different fabric so as not to waste the new. You can pretty much tell how it's going to turn out, and whether you'll like it or not.
    Thanks so much for the link...she has great quilts!

    Of course, I didn't read through all the posts, and wrote my post before I did. Of course, several people before me spied the D9P...you got my 2-cents worth anyway! LOL
    Last edited by emlee51; 06-20-2012 at 07:08 PM.

  15. #40
    Super Member KyKaren1949's Avatar
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    Welcome to quilting, Betsy! I love your pattern. I believe this is also called "Hanky Panky" in another pattern, isn't it? We actually worked on this one today in my quilt guild.

    One of the best websites I use for help is http://quilting.about.com/bio/Janet-...18651.htm?nl=1
    I find Janet Wickell's instructions to be simple and easy to understand. Plus, she's great about answering you if you email her with questions. She's also on Facebook!
    Karen in Kentucky

  16. #41
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    What I saw was a variation of the disappearing nine patch. A nine patch is an ideal block to begin with and an ideal block to do with chain piecing. Each row of the 9 patch can be stitched from a strip then cut into the 3 squares across. Then each 9 patch can be cut to make what you'll be using.
    GrannieAnnie is right about this quilt. I am somewhat amazed that the instructions ask you to cut and piece this pattern as they do. It would be much simpler to do it the way it's usually done. In this case, each 9 patch block will have 4 white squares, one in the middle of each side. Then it will have three fabrics from the diagonal row it's on and one each from from the diagonal row before and after. For example, the orange row blocks will have one red corner and one turquoise corner. Here is a link demonstrating how to make a disappearing nine patch, which is an excellent pattern for a newbie, as well as us old-bies. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clL_nz8J_vg Instead of arranging the piece the way she does in the video, you just flip two of the corners so that there are only 2 small squares in the middle. There are other instructions out there that you can google, but this one is pretty straightforward and has the light squares where you'll want to place your whites. All the squares start out the same size.

    Safety is task number 1! I'm tired of seeing people type on this board about cutting themselves. Most of us had at least a close call as beginners. Never put any part of you or another person (or pet) in front of where you're pushing the cutter. It's a good idea to coat the under side of your rulers with rubber cement before you begin. They will be much more stable, and this doesn't hurt the rulers.

    I'm editing this to add that the quilt has about a half a block more on the left side, so those are going to have to be pieced as the instructions show. That's extra practice cutting and piecing different sizes, I guess, but if it was my quilt, I'd probably just go ahead and make another complete row, unless there's not enough fabric to do so, or you have to have a quilt exactly the size given.

    Welcome to the QB, and best wishes for your project!
    Last edited by Rose_P; 06-20-2012 at 08:14 PM.

  17. #42
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    I wonder if the designer's instructions are different from the usual D9P because she used a different combination of fabrics in each color i.e in the blue row all the fabrics are different. So it would be almost impossible to strip piece.
    jean

  18. #43
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    I think I'd cut-then start chain piecing. You will probably get more pieces from your fabric by cutting 6.5 in. strips, then cutting that in 3.5 in. pieces. That really won't be that many cuts if you use your rotary cutter. You will be surprised at how fast it goes. I love the pattern you have chosen. Please share the finished quilt with us!

  19. #44
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joyce888 View Post
    Welcome from Canton, GA. Love the pattern, can't wait to see your quilt - good luck!
    Welcome from across the river in WI. I, too, love this pattern & am excited to see yours all done. I know you'll do great! Slow & steady wins the race!
    (`v)
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    (.(. (..`..♥ rebecca

  20. #45
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    I would be nice to have an "Angel" watching over your shoulder as you start. Do you know of any friends who quilt who would be willing to do this? An hour or so would make a big difference in your confidence. Check with a local quilt club.
    Last edited by maviskw; 06-21-2012 at 06:06 AM.

  21. #46
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    I'm back! I would certainly count how many pieces I need that have the same color with the white, and sew strips together of the 3.5 and 6.5 for as long as I need to cut all of these at one time. For instance: a small yellow square and a white 3.5 by 6.5 strip are used in Blocks A, B, and R. So you would need a strip of light yellow which is 3.5 times three, or 10.5 inches. (I would cut it 11 inches.) Sew to a 6.5 inch strip of white. You don't need to cut off the white just yet. Press and cut three strip 3.5 inches wide.
    You will need 10 of the Light pink and white strips, so you need a strip at least 35 inches of the 3.5 light pink and 6.5 white. Sew them together, and then cut the 10 strips 3.5 inches wide. The other 3.5 X 6.5 white strip in each block goes with the large square, and that one goes up and down, so be sure to mark which one you are using. I would draw a line through each two-piece in the picture to make it less confusing. Then sew a 3.5 strip of white to a 6.5 strip of dark pink, and cut the 6.5 sub strips. You need 11 of these. 6.5 x 11 is 71.5 inches. Repeat with other colors.
    This would speed up the cutting and sewing. Then you lay them out somewhere as they will be on the quilt before you sew any more together. The picture will be your guide.
    Happy speedy quilting.
    Last edited by maviskw; 06-21-2012 at 08:06 AM. Reason: I want to delete post. It won't work unless you use all the same colors, not different prints as in the picture.

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