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Thread: Chemo quilt size?

  1. #1
    Super Member Belfrybat's Avatar
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    Chemo quilt size?

    Three members of my church have been diagnosed with cancer this past week and will be undergoing chemo. I head up a prayer quilt group. What is the best size for chemo quilts? I figure maybe narrow but long?

  2. #2
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    you might want to check with the infusion center they will use. the one i donate to likes them about 40-42 wide and 50-60 long. they did tell me they would take anything, though
    Nancy in western NY
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  3. #3
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnNan View Post
    you might want to check with the infusion center they will use. the one i donate to likes them about 40-42 wide and 50-60 long. they did tell me they would take anything, though
    Agree!!
    Check with the facilities first ... they may have "rules" that should be considered.

    Yes, you are giving this to your friends, but considerations need to be made to the staff at the facilities, as it does impact their working day.

    40x50 or 60 is generally a good sizing.

    Another suggestion ... it would be good to make a carrying bag to go with the quilts, to make it easier for your friends to take them with them. Add in some zippered pockets for take alongs. Zippers will make it easier so that no one has to watch for things that may fall out ...... or the need to retrieve them!
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    Senior Member TheMerkleFamily's Avatar
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    This is timely information as we just discovered today that my DSIL has cancer and will begin chemo treatments immediately. I'm in the process of pulling together fabric tonight to make a chemo quilt. I never realized the facilities would have 'rules' that might limit the size of a personal quilt. I guess I better check with them in the morning before I start cutting. I agree a carrying bag would be a good idea too.

    Prayers to all who are fighting this fight

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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    Agree!!
    Check with the facilities first ... they may have "rules" that should be considered.

    Yes, you are giving this to your friends, but considerations need to be made to the staff at the facilities, as it does impact their working day.

    40x50 or 60 is generally a good sizing.

    Another suggestion ... it would be good to make a carrying bag to go with the quilts, to make it easier for your friends to take them with them. Add in some zippered pockets for take alongs. Zippers will make it easier so that no one has to watch for things that may fall out ...... or the need to retrieve them!
    My late stepdad received a quilt when he was in hospital, it was a generous lap size, perhaps 60x60 or 72x72, and it came with a bag. It was donated by local quilters. It was wide enough to cover him and the sides of the hospital bed and long enough to cover his feet to his chin. Mum received a couple other smaller quilts too. One is similar to the suggested size given of 40x60. Mum uses it to cover herself when watching TV. It has poly batting, so a nice loft and is simply quilted.

    She appreciates them all.
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  6. #6
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    I don't think any facility has a limit on a personal quilt. I do know how cold you are when receiving chemotherapy and a quilt would certainly help and you are wrapped in love too. You just need something wide enough to cover you and long enough to go at least to ankles. My humble opinion.

  7. #7
    Senior Member TheMerkleFamily's Avatar
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    FYI - just spoke to the director of volunteer services at the infusion center who said they will take donations whatever you wish to make.. In their case, they see hundreds daily so there's plenty of need/demand and it's in Pennsylvania so it's burrrrrrrrr cold in the winter.

    She did say they prefer a range of quilt sizes - as small as one to cover an adult from waist-to-ankle (i.e. just lap) to a longer length that would cover neck-to-ankle. She said the patients also enjoy small pillows, chemo caps, shawls, anything that provides warmth and cover. Sewn, crocheted, knitted - all are welcome. Now I'm on a quest to research chemo cap sewing patterns.

    I plan to accommodate my DSIL and then keep making more to donate
    Christine
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  8. #8
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMerkleFamily View Post
    .......I never realized the facilities would have 'rules' that might limit the size of a personal quilt.......
    Yes sadly, some do.
    Sometimes for the manageability of their staff to work with ... too big and awkward that it can get in the way. Or that it may be problems with the equipment, beds, chairs etc.

    For the donor quilts ... if they are being kept at a facility and maintained/laundered by them, there often are requirements regarding the types of fabric/batting, and again sizing.

    Great that you have now checked for the specific location yours will be used, and now know pretty much anything will be greatly received. Though it is still important to keep in mind that other places, same locale or far away, there may be different requirements, yes rules!

    Enjoy making yours, for your DSIL and best wishes to her.
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  9. #9
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    A year ago today I started chemo. A group of friends made me a quilt to use. How wonderful that quilt was to keep me warm as each infusion time was at least 3 hours long. It also warmed the cockles of my heart to know that people cared enough to do this for me.
    I can't imagine that any center would have restrictions about what size of a personal quilt or blanket someone could bring in. Comfort is the name of the game and not size restrictions. One that would cover shoulders to toes is good and since mine was wider I just used it doubled over. The infusion chairs are generally recliner type chairs and you don't want to get things caught in the gears etc. when reclining the chair or getting up to move around.
    The idea of a bag is excellent. I had a bag that I took where my quilt, a beverage, book and some other goodies fit.
    For those of you who are planning on making these quilts remember that a gift such as this not only warms the body but the soul as well. Both are important when it comes to chemo.

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    As an alternative to an "extra" with the bag, consider putting ties on the quilt in such a way that the quilt can be rolled and the tie pulled around either by conventional tying, with a velcro strip, or an elastic loop. Isn't this a way that some sleeping bags are contained? I have done this when traveling and want a small cover-up. It tucks into the overhead nicely when not in use or can become a pillow.

  11. #11
    Super Member PS Stitcher's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, I too have had this experience. I was diagnosed with breast cancer at 40. My quilt was about a generous lap or small twin. It was large enough to go from my chin to cover my feet. The chemo drugs aren't warmed before you get them and you can get so cold!! But my infusion center did not have any restrictions. They said I could bring whatever I wanted that would make me happy!! A bag is a great idea to carry it in!! And then you can put your stitching in it as well. I would sit and bind quilts during my 6 hour chemo sessions. So I was doubly warm!!

    Next month is 4 years cancer free for me!!
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  12. #12
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by citruscountyquilter View Post
    ......The infusion chairs are generally recliner type chairs and you don't want to get things caught in the gears etc. when reclining the chair or getting up to move around.........
    So sorry that you had to go through this, and do hope that you are improving all the time.

    What you have described is why some have put requirements in place.
    Probably, at some point an oversized quilt got caught ... and well, you can see what may have happened.
    Or someone just went overboard in panic mode, before it did.
    Maybe a case of the one apple spoiling the whole bunch?
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    Senior Member Quiltah Mama's Avatar
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    I just joined this forum last month, and have been doing a lot of reading and have learned a lot of tips and tricks. When I got to this thread I just had to respond though. I have been making charity chemo quilts for a local organization for three years now. They do not have any restrictions on size, however, I have gotten really good feedback from them that a good size that works well for the patient and staff is 44x60 inches. I have been making that size since. I also back all of mine with either flannel or fleece for the added warmth and comfort. And I do make a carry bag for each one too.

  14. #14
    Super Member Belfrybat's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your responses! What I'm hearing is long and narrow, so I think I'll aim for 40 x 65 so someone can cover from head to toe if they want. I hadn't thought about a bag, so many thanks for that idea. Now to get busy!

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    I used a layer cake to make a quilt for a cousin. 6 across x 7 rows plus added a border on top & bottom & narrow on the sides to make sure it covered head to toe. If she wants to dble it it is possible or there is room for her to snuggle with grandkids. A couple of other cousins delivered it after I left MI & said she really liked it 7 it is keeping her warm.

  16. #16
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    Our church group makes our prayer quilts about 45x54 or 58. Any bigger and they become difficult for the recipient to deal with. I think 45 was chosen originally as it was the width of fabric and made backing the quilt easier. The ones I make at home end up 48 by 60, which feels better to me.

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    My cousins bought me a real cute electric fuzzy heated throw. Wasn't allowed to use it, so only covered up in it when I got home from Chemo. They kept bringing me the heated blankets that they keep in the warmer. Three years cancer free. My husband will be two years cancer free in January.

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