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Thread: Cleaning your machines

  1. #1
    Junior Member Cresha's Avatar
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    Just got all of all four of my machines cleaned. I clean my quilter everytime I finish a quilt. The other three I clean about every three months, more if I have used them alot more than usual. I always feel so good after they are clean. When I got my first machine years ago, the kind little old man who sold it to me said if I would clean it every three months, it would last a lifetime (little did he know how much I would sew!) It only lasted about twenty years, until it was worn out. He sold me my next one and then retired. Since then I have bought the serger and the quilter and and embroidery machine. But I never forgot the advice he gave me about cleaning them. When I take them to the "new guy" for a check up, he always comments on how clean they are. How often do you clean your machines?

  2. #2
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    Everytime i finish a quilt, i clean her all down, and change the needle.And she gets a drop of oil in the wick.

    ..the bobbin area is done everytime i have to change the bobbin..

    i have a tiny vac for sewing machines and computers..
    I have the Janome 6600p

  3. #3
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    Interested in the tiny vac for sewing machines....what type and where to purchase.

  4. #4
    Super Member grammy Dwynn's Avatar
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    When ever it needs it. If I am working with flannel, I sometimes clean it twice per project, because of all the lint build up. With cotton, after each project. I just try to keep a eye one the lint build up. So, I guess I do it more than every three month. It does not take much lint to mess up the machine.

  5. #5
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    this is similiar to what i have, but i got mine on ebay.and i am sorry, it is the attachments, not the vac itself.

    http://www.ezvacuum.com/mini-attachm...l?currency=USD

    Nancy's notions also has them
    http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...achment+kit.do

    I think they also make battery operated ones..but i have no idea how good they work..hope this helps..

  6. #6
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    Check your manual, some machines say not to use a vac in them. I clean mine after one use, if it was a linty job, or after about enough time to wear out a needle. This is just a quicky clean. A real cleaning is done on it about ever four months ( at the change of a season) by me, once a year by the shop.

  7. #7
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I do a quick clean on my bobbin area every three or four bobbin changes, but my machine is VERY picky about lint build up in a couple of places. It gets a really good cleaning a couple of times a month :D:D:D

    I would like to get a vacuum attachment too!!!

  8. #8
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    RedGarnett..why would a vac be bad for your machine?curious.
    i know for sure the canned air is...my dealer told me not to use it. just pushes the lint further into the machine.

    I also take my Janome in once a year..i plan on her lasting a long, long time.

    I have had her about 5 years now..and this is the way i have always cleaned the machine..my dealer even sells the mini attachments..but they want to much money for them..

  9. #9
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    I know how my machine should sound, and when I notice the diffence, I have my hubby clean and oil it.

  10. #10
    Super Member beachlady's Avatar
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    I clean the bobbin area every time I change it.

  11. #11
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    My machines are cleaned after every project, oiled and a new needle put in so it's ready for the next project. I have a small fan paint brush that I use to clean out the bobbin area every bobbin change. :)

  12. #12
    Senior Member quilter girl's Avatar
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    I clean my bobbin area with each bobbin change. I use a paint brush, pipe cleaner and a clean mascara wand (that's my fav). I purchased small attachments that I fit on my vacuum hose from Menards (hardware store) did have to purchase an adapter so it would fit on my vacuums hose.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I clean around the bobbin every time I enpty one and take a long handled paint brush and brush out all the lint I see. If it sounds noisy I remove the plate above the feed dogs and brush that out also. I put a drop of oil on the bobbin rim each time also. I brush around and behind the tesion knob when I see lint. I oil it after about every 6-8 hours of sewing as manual directs.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Dancer
    My machines are cleaned after every project, oiled and a new needle put in so it's ready for the next project. I have a small fan paint brush that I use to clean out the bobbin area every bobbin change. :)
    This is a very good practice to get into and I do the same thing, except I blow out the lint in the bobbin area.

    Billy

  15. #15
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lostn51
    This is a very good practice to get into and I do the same thing, except I blow out the lint in the bobbin area.
    Billy
    I was told by an instructor not to ever blow into our sewing machine innerds. Evidently the condensation from our breath can actually cause the metal parts to rust. I told her I blew, not spit, wherein she laughed and said it amounted to the same thing. It's also why we aren't supposed to stick pins in our mouths, because it can cause the pins to rust. Just thought I'd throw that out there for you. (Don't spit in my direction if you disagree! :lol: )


    I clean my machine after every project or every 6-12 hours of sewing, or about once a week. I clean out the bobbin area once every 1-2 bobbins. If I have to fill my bobbins, it's time to clean! I also change my needle after every project. I should do it more often, at least according to the experts, but money is a bit tight and those darn needles can get expensive.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffany
    I was told by an instructor not to ever blow into our sewing machine innerds. Evidently the condensation from our breath can actually cause the metal parts to rust. I told her I blew, not spit, wherein she laughed and said it amounted to the same thing. It's also why we aren't supposed to stick pins in our mouths, because it can cause the pins to rust. Just thought I'd throw that out there for you. (Don't spit in my direction if you disagree! :lol: )


    I clean my machine after every project or every 6-12 hours of sewing, or about once a week. I clean out the bobbin area once every 1-2 bobbins. If I have to fill my bobbins, it's time to clean! I also change my needle after every project. I should do it more often, at least according to the experts, but money is a bit tight and those darn needles can get expensive.
    I like your response to the instructor!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

    I use compressed air to blow out my bobbin area so no spit is involved, but I can understand the whole condensation thing though.

    But lets not forget that the newest machine that I use is 62 years old so what works well for me might not be the best for the folks who have the newfangled machines.

    Billy

  17. #17
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I was lucky to work with an ex industrial sewing machine maint. tech. I would bring him my machines and he would show me how to get the housing off and where to clean, where to oil, how to fix the clutch for the bobbin winder, and how to set the timing. I haven't had to use a machine repairman in years. I did let one shop order a new part for one of my machines and found out later when I cleaned it a used part was put in but I was charged for a new one. It makes me wonder how many repairs are made this way.

  18. #18
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I clean mine after each project. I had to clean more when I made the flannel quilts. They were so linty.

  19. #19
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    I cleand the bobbin area every time I change the bobbin. I clean the rest when the noises changes. Take it to be clean about once a year. My favorite cleaning tools other than a brush are a pipe cleaner (I have to keep hidden bc it's Emmy's favorite toy) and a clean mascara brush.

  20. #20
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    I have a Viking machine and the shop I bought it from quoted $89 for a "tune up" and cleaning. I understand that it will take a bit of time, but I'm wondering how many $89 tune-ups I should have on a $500 machine?

    I clean the bobbin area about once a week with a paint brush and pipe cleaners. If I see lint in other areas, I take apart all I can and clean out the lint.

    Does anybody actually remove screws from the housing and really get into the works of their machine? I'm wondering if I can do this and save myself big $$$.

    What do you think??

    Sue

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkiris
    Does anybody actually remove screws from the housing and really get into the works of their machine? I'm wondering if I can do this and save myself big $$$.

    What do you think??

    Sue
    I think in a way this is kinda going overboard but since I service vintage machines it has turned second nature for me to do this each and every time I use one of my machines.

    The first thing I do is pull the machine down to get to all of the workings then I make sure all of the lint is out of the works. Then I oil the machine top to bottom, front to back. Essentially I give my machines a complete service before I use it on the next project. Even to the extent of putting my set of gauges on the machine and checking the tensions of the bobbin and feed.

    Billy

  22. #22
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    On these newer machines, they tell you NOT to oil. I can't even find an oil hole on my Pfaff. On my mom's Golden Touch and Sew that I inherited, yes, I can.

  23. #23
    Junior Member Kryssa's Avatar
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    When you guys say you clean it after every project and clean the bobbin area after every bobbin change, what does that mean? I am new and just got my machine last week and want to take care of it. I'm guessing it means more then wiping down the outside :P

    I am kind of afraid of my machine. I worry that if I were to open it up, I'd break it :P

  24. #24
    Super Member oldswimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojo47
    On these newer machines, they tell you NOT to oil. I can't even find an oil hole on my Pfaff. On my mom's Golden Touch and Sew that I inherited, yes, I can.
    Boy I am glad to hear you say that. I bought a Pfaff not too long ago and I clean the bobbin area, but I never could find any place to oil it. Kept looking through the instructions to see if I was missing it. I took it in today because I thought it needed a good look through. I am just used to cleaning and oiling my old Kenmore I guess.

  25. #25
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
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    I've wondered about the $89.00 price I was quoted about cleaning and a tune up for my Viking. What do you think? I'm really anal about cleaning my machine. I don't take it apart. I'm sure there's something in there that probably needs checked, right? I guess I'm trying to justify spending that $89 when it runs fine and sounds fine. Suggestions please...
    I have a Dirt Devil Kwik-a really small (12") hand vac that works great on my machine, computer, and any other electronics. Just enough suction but not too "sucky" (is that a word?) to damage equipment.

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