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Thread: cotton theory

  1. #1
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    does anyone know anything about betty cotton and her cotton theory? she developed a reversible quilt technique whereby only sections are done at one time. i once saw one in a lqs window, but i forget how it worked.

    she has two books, the cotton theory quilting and the cotton theory quilting 2, but i don't want to buy them and my library doesn't have them. any
    clues out there?

  2. #2
    Super Member retrogirl02's Avatar
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    I have not heard of cotton theory but do know that Georgia Bonesteel is famous for her lap quilting methods similar to today's quilt as you go. Is this what you're looking for?

  3. #3
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loretta
    I took her lecture and she does beautiful quilts! But there are many other people who do the same technique. One is even a member of this board and you will enjoy this tutorial. http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/2974.page
    thanks lorretta. but when i saw the cotton one it looked like all the seams were somehow raised to three dimensions and then somehow machine stitched down.

    the panels had been finished individually completely and then somehow attached as tho they were single layers of fabric with a seam allowance. but i cant remember how that happened.

  4. #4
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
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    If you go to Nancy Zieman's website, nancysnotions.com you can watch the whole series of shows by Betty Cotton.

    I have used this method and it is neat, but it will create a somewhat stiff quilt because of the seams.

    When I did the Cotton Theory quilting, I bought Hobbs 80/20 batting and cut the 18 inch strips myself. Gave me more money to spend on thread! WOO HOO

  5. #5
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashnquilt
    If you go to Nancy Zieman's website, nancysnotions.com you can watch the whole series of shows by Betty Cotton.

    I have used this method and it is neat, but it will create a somewhat stiff quilt because of the seams.

    When I did the Cotton Theory quilting, I bought Hobbs 80/20 batting and cut the 18 inch strips myself. Gave me more money to spend on thread! WOO HOO
    thank you so much. i'm going to look for it right now!

  6. #6
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    i see a whole video playlist but there is a fee to either watch it or to buy the book - whichever.

    if you know the sequence for getting it, that i'm just not catching on to, can you tell me? i would really like to see it in action.

    it is possible, of course, that it's not there any more. or that what used to be free isn't any more.

  7. #7
    Senior Member krabadan's Avatar
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    I have many of her patterns, books and the DVD and have made four of the quilts. I love the technique.

  8. #8
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    okay...as i understand it, you cut strips of fabric and batting. you quilt the sandwich you have made from them, leaving seam allowances. then do you finish the edge before you go on to repeat? i cant picture how to get that raised edge in the middle of the quilt. it looks like each section is completely finished as an entire quilt, binding and all. then two sections are attached as blocks, with a seam. the 'seam' is the part that sticks up and then gets sewn down with a decorative stitch. right? wrong? duh!

    are the sections sewn together as an envelope quilt and then attached with a raised seam allowance that gets stitched down?

    am i ready for the nuthouse? am i from mars? delusional? does this theory really exist?

  9. #9

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    I've never done cotton theory, but I have done quilt as you go. I just sew one block together, layer it, and quilt it. Then, as I go along, I fold back the batting and backing and sew those blocks together. Then whipstitch the backing together. I am really not good at explainging things, but it really is easy.

    Here is one link I found. This is how I do it.
    http://welshquilter.blogspot.com/200...as-you-go.html


  10. #10
    Senior Member krabadan's Avatar
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    One inch seams are sewn together, wrong sides together, then folded in and secured with a zigzag or other decorative stitch.

  11. #11
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I watched the videos, I think it was on 2 of Sewing with Nancy shows.
    It is very exacting and time consumming but so is quilting. It makes a nice reversible quilt but looks like it wont be very soft.

  12. #12
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyndawn
    I've never done cotton theory, but I have done quilt as you go. I just sew one block together, layer it, and quilt it. Then, as I go along, I fold back the batting and backing and sew those blocks together. Then whipstitch the backing together. I am really not good at explainging things, but it really is easy.

    Here is one link I found. This is how I do it.
    http://welshquilter.blogspot.com/200...as-you-go.html
    you did a great job describing that method, and i've done it. what i'm talking about is different. i wish i could show you. if you search 'cotton theory quilting' you should be able to see thumbnail pix of some finished items.

  13. #13
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Marie
    I watched the videos, I think it was on 2 of Sewing with Nancy shows.
    It is very exacting and time consumming but so is quilting. It makes a nice reversible quilt but looks like it wont be very soft.
    i'm actually thinking ahead, but maybe flannel? for a baby?

  14. #14
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    Use a very heavy good flannel that wont stretch. The method uses flat feld seams so you dont want a fabric that gives to much.
    If you subscribe to QNN they should have the videos since Sewing with Nancy is one of their series.
    I droped my subscription since I watched all the videos that interested me. Had a lot of time on my hands when I was first learning to quilt and I wanted to learn as much as I could.

  15. #15
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    i don't subscribe. i have enough to do. but the thought of heavy flannel is a good idea. thanks,

  16. #16
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
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    I'm very intriqued on her method and am looking for a used book to try it. I've done some quiltasyougo that I found on line and it worked fine...

  17. #17
    FinelyFabricated's Avatar
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    My sister does uses the Cotton theory quilting. Dara's quilts aren't real stiff, but I don't now what brands of fabrics she uses.

    I don't like the look of sashing and that's what the joining strips remind me of, so I listened attentively while Dara explained it. Then promptly forgot it. LOL, she feels the same way about paper piecing which I just love to do.

  18. #18
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    I use a method which is similar to foundation piecing. You make each block with the printed fabrics, a batting and a foundation of any light colored fabric such as muslin or old sheets. Trim to exact size and finish the edge by zigzagging around the outside. For the first block you put your backing (same size as the block) on the back before finishing the edge. This are joined to the next block or sashing by laying the two blocks right sides together and putting a backing fabric right side facing the backing on the first fabric. Stitch 1/4 inche from edge. Then flip the block and the backing over so they are wrong sides in and right sides out. You continue to join pieces for as much quilt as you want. This is similar to the charity quilts that are made by sewing larger pieces together and flipping them to sew the next piece. I have heard it called flip and sew. The seams to connect the blocks are thicker than a normal quilt, but it is so much easier and less expensive than paying someone to quilt it for you. If you trim the batting around the edges before you finish the edges of the blocks, it will eliminate some of the bulk.

  19. #19
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    I use a method which is similar to foundation piecing. You make each block with the printed fabrics, a batting and a foundation of any light colored fabric such as muslin or old sheets. Trim to exact size and finish the edge by zigzagging around the outside. For the first block you put your backing (same size as the block) on the back before finishing the edge. This are joined to the next block or sashing by laying the two blocks right sides together and putting a backing fabric right side facing the backing on the first fabric. Stitch 1/4 inche from edge. Then flip the block and the backing over so they are wrong sides in and right sides out. You continue to join pieces for as much quilt as you want. This is similar to the charity quilts that are made by sewing larger pieces together and flipping them to sew the next piece. I have heard it called flip and sew. The seams to connect the blocks are thicker than a normal quilt, but it is so much easier and less expensive than paying someone to quilt it for you. If you trim the batting around the edges before you finish the edges of the blocks, it will eliminate some of the bulk. The quilt in my picture was done this way.

  20. #20
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    See my message under cotton theory thread.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have the cotton theory book and hope one day to make one. I never think to use it when I am looking for another quilt pattern to use.

  22. #22
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Sorry this was a duplicate :oops: :oops: :oops:

  23. #23
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retrogirl02
    I have not heard of cotton theory but do know that Georgia Bonesteel is famous for her lap quilting methods similar to today's quilt as you go. Is this what you're looking for?


    I have her books, and one of them is for this type of quilting, i also have another pattern for making it this way.

  24. #24
    Senior Member adriansmom's Avatar
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    I took a class on this...it is pretty easy to do. each section is sandwiched and quilted..then joined together with one unch seams..then u trim one side if the seam back, fold over the other (like u would with binding) and then machine stitch it down using a decorative stitch. The one I did was Courthouse Steps...making placements.

  25. #25
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
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    this is a form of "quit as you go" that I found on the internet and used on a crazy quilt....works but won't do it again...

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