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Thread: Crazy Quilt backing

  1. #1
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    I would like to do a crazy quilt...but I have researched the pattern and it seems do able, but nothing I have found addresses the backing...is it just stitched to the quilt and the border is attached? No batting either? Thanks for your help...memepeggy

  2. #2
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    crazy quilts are (usually) foundation pieced-
    depending on the weight of the quilt top when finished batting is sometimes used- other times not.
    since there is alot of embellishing/beads, buttons, ect...on a crazy quilt they are normally tied not quilted.
    they do normally have a back.
    some people work on embellishing one block at a time- others put their blocks together then embellish the quilt...and some people choose to machine quilt their crazy quilt- letting some of the quilting be some of the embellishment- then embellishing more after the quilting is done.
    but traditionally- they are tied because of the danger of hitting the embellishments.

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    ckcowl, thank you so much...I thought it must be tied, but could not find anything on the info I had...thanks again...memepeggy

  4. #4
    MTS
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    It's the a common lacking element in most of the crazy quilt books as well. Almost as annoying as the "quilt as desired" for regular quilting patterns.

    The traditional old crazy quilts that I've actually seen were all tied or tacked, with backing, no batting. And the ties were to the back.

    I've actually got one sitting here that I'm supposed to finish for a friend. I finally found (3 years ago :roll: ) the perfect velvet border at Mary Jo's. So my plan is to put those on - wide, around 8".

    The backing is dupioni silk - it was a remnant piece that was very cost effective ;-) , and I'm not crazy about the color so it's perfect. I'm not planning on using any batting.

    And then I'm going to either "birth" it and tack it, OR tie/tack it the regular way, and bring the velvet to the back.

    The thing is my friend wants to hang it, so I've got to make sure it's evenly stable enough throughout that it doesn't sag anywhere. And I really don't want to have to tack the velvet borders.

    So that's possibly maybe perhaps what I'm going to do. :roll:

  5. #5
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    MTS...thank you for your comment ....element lacking in info...I thought maybe it was just me and I wasn't being careful in my searching...that happens from time to time with me...so, thanks again....memepeggy

  6. #6
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    I've actually got one sitting here that I'm supposed to finish for a friend. I finally found (3 years ago :roll: ) the perfect velvet border at Mary Jo's. So my plan is to put those on - wide, around 8".

    The backing is dupioni silk - it was a remnant piece that was very cost effective ;-) , and I'm not crazy about the color so it's perfect. I'm not planning on using any batting.

    And then I'm going to either "birth" it and tack it, OR tie/tack it the regular way, and bring the velvet to the back.

    The thing is my friend wants to hang it, so I've got to make sure it's evenly stable enough throughout that it doesn't sag anywhere. And I really don't want to have to tack the velvet borders.

    So that's possibly maybe perhaps what I'm going to do. :roll:
    MTS: maybe you could put a layer of interfacing in the sandwich before you turn it. They do have kinds that have a bit of drape to them. This would help keep it from sagging a bit.

  7. #7
    Super Member jeaninmaine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    I'm going to either "birth" it and tack it, OR tie/tack it the regular way, and bring the velvet to the back.
    What do you mean by "birth" it???

  8. #8
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeaninmaine
    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    I'm going to either "birth" it and tack it, OR tie/tack it the regular way, and bring the velvet to the back.
    What do you mean by "birth" it???
    Putting quilt top and backing right sides together, stitching around the edges, leaving a 12" space unsewn, and then turning the whole thing inside out.

    We've just always called it birthing in my group.

    I'm sure there is a valid technical term which is unknown to me. ;-)

  9. #9
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    I suspect the reason the info is so lacking on backing, battings, tying them off is because many were left without a backing. My family has one made by my great-great grandmother and her twin sister who were milliners. It was never backed so my grandmother who never learned to sew hired a lady to back it. She used a heavy gray knit. It's awful. However when my mother took it to be included in a history of antique quilts that was done in 1976, the historian told her to leave it that way as it helped stablize it. Possibly because they were made with pieces of fancy fabrics, ribbons, etc they were on going projects that might never have been finished. When more fancy bites of fabric came to them, the quilts grew in size. They were often layed out over a bed or a piece of furniture just for show, so they didn't need to have a batting. And most people couldn't afford a large piece of fancy fabric to back them if they were finished to the size the maker wanted. Just my thoughts...

  10. #10
    Super Member Theresa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    Quote Originally Posted by jeaninmaine
    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    I'm going to either "birth" it and tack it, OR tie/tack it the regular way, and bring the velvet to the back.
    What do you mean by "birth" it???
    Putting quilt top and backing right sides together, stitching around the edges, leaving a 12" space unsewn, and then turning the whole thing inside out.

    We've just always called it birthing in my group.

    I'm sure there is a valid technical term which is unknown to me. ;-)
    Another new quilting term is "born"!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by meme peggy
    I would like to do a crazy quilt...but I have researched the pattern and it seems do able, but nothing I have found addresses the backing...is it just stitched to the quilt and the border is attached? No batting either? Thanks for your help...memepeggy
    Http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-44627-1.htmb
    I had a few questions about how to finish mine. Thanks for the help

  12. #12
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    I remember a crazy quilt done by someone in my family which we unfortunately used until it fell into pieces! As I recall it was tied with the knots to the back. It was truly gorgeous and had a dark green silk/sateen backing no binding just an envelope finish. Have fun with the stitching!!

  13. #13
    Member RUTH ANN MUNDY's Avatar
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    WARNING - - CRAZY QUILTING CAN BE ADDITIVE
    I STITCHED ON FOUNDATION BLOCKS AND USED BLACK AROUND EACH BLOCK ONCE THE TOP WAS ALL PUT TOGETHER IT WAS QUIT HEAVY WITHOUT ADDING A BATTING. I PUT A COTTON BACK ( DARK RED WITH BIG BLACK ROSES AND VINES) I DID SOME STITCHING WITH INVESIBLE THREAD AND IT LOOKED NICE. NANCY KIRK APPRAISED IT AT $3500-$4000 SO I WAS HAPPY

  14. #14
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by RUTH ANN MUNDY
    WARNING - - CRAZY QUILTING CAN BE ADDITIVE
    Agreed.

    Do you have a picture of your quilt? I'd love to see it.


    Ruth,
    Please turn off the Caps Lock key when posting. It makes it difficult to read the text. Thank you. :thumbup:

  15. #15
    Member RUTH ANN MUNDY's Avatar
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    Sorry about the caps I will try to send a picture of the quilt I have never sent one before so Hope this works.

    crazy quilt
    Name:  Attachment-190233.jpe
Views: 611
Size:  66.6 KB

  16. #16
    MTS
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    Ruth-
    It's lovely, and a ton of work. Is that black fabric cotton or velvet? It's very, very deep, and really frames each of the blocks.

  17. #17
    Member RUTH ANN MUNDY's Avatar
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    The back is a very pretty deep red with black roses and vines also the black is not velvet it is a black man made suade like material it looks rich. Velvet and or velvetine is very heavy and hard to work with. I have other pictures I will try to send sometime. I need to got sew for charity to day. I am enjoying this site.

  18. #18
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    Do you use your foundation for your backing or is the backing seperate. I have made blocks but haven't put them together. I have a crazy quilt from my gggrandmother in the 1800's. In the center she emb. Will you remember me when I am gone. She was an orphan. I wouldn't take anything for it.

  19. #19
    Super Member Rose L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RUTH ANN MUNDY
    WARNING - - CRAZY QUILTING CAN BE ADDITIVE
    I STITCHED ON FOUNDATION BLOCKS AND USED BLACK AROUND EACH BLOCK ONCE THE TOP WAS ALL PUT TOGETHER IT WAS QUIT HEAVY WITHOUT ADDING A BATTING. I PUT A COTTON BACK ( DARK RED WITH BIG BLACK ROSES AND VINES) I DID SOME STITCHING WITH INVESIBLE THREAD AND IT LOOKED NICE. NANCY KIRK APPRAISED IT AT $3500-$4000 SO I WAS HAPPY
    Nancy really loves those crazy quilts!! I took restoration classes with her, so knowledgeable!

  20. #20
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    Hi,
    I went to a crazy quilt show in Madison,WI last year and there were about 20 quilts. The blocks were all finished differently. There is no RIGHT way to make a crazy quilt. It is truly crazy! My best advice is to use a backing that helps stabilize the whole quilt. I made a crazy quilt for my daughter's wedding and it took me 5 years. It had 8" square blocks set 9 across and 12 down. No sashings and no borders. Unfortunately I used old clothing she found in resale shops and I pieced the backing with stretchable velvet. BIG mistake. She hung it on the wall and it wrinkles funny. I made it the size to fit her bed and since she requested dark reds and blacks silks and velvets thats what I used. Then she painted her bedroom brown. I was not happy, but she found a place to hang it and it is really a very lovely focal point for the room.

  21. #21
    Super Member jbj137's Avatar
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    WOW!!! NICE!!!

    J J

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RUTH ANN MUNDY
    Sorry about the caps I will try to send a picture of the quilt I have never sent one before so Hope this works.
    Magnificent!!

  23. #23
    Junior Member K.P.'s Avatar
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    Since you use a foundation for crazy quilt blocks, to avoid having my crazy quilt be so heavy when done (it is king-size), I used Bounty paper towel sheets (11 X 11 size) as the foundation backing; they stay in the quilt, and since Bounty is a very strudy towel, it goes through the wash without any issues...just an option for you. I did have my quilt quilted by a long-arm quilter with light batting rather than tying, but I didn't add dimensional embellishments, just decorative stitching over all the seams. The quilt I am talking about is my avatar.

  24. #24
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    I did this one in a class last year. It's quilt-as-you-go method. Each block is sewn and includes the batting and backing. Then the blocks are joined together with narrow sashing to butt the blocks together. Borders are keyhole strips, each one sewn onto a strip of batting and backing then joined to the quilt the same way the blocks were joined together.

    crazy quilt
    Name:  Attachment-190295.jpe
Views: 515
Size:  58.2 KB

  25. #25
    Senior Member BJ SewKkrazzy's Avatar
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    I have been crazy quilting for 15 years, and never use batting and usually just tie the front to the back. My Christmas stockings have batting in them to make them "puffy"...but if you look at my site, most of my stuff is deco items, rarely would I make a whole bed quilt. It's almost a misnomer to call it Crazy Quilting, because we don't always make quilts!!!! But it's true, there is no right or wrong way, and it's also true...it's addicting!!! I also call it my therapy!!!!!!!!!!!!

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