Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 24 of 24

Thread: Do I really need a special ruler to...

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    208
    Blog Entries
    25

    Do I really need a special ruler to...

    make the corner piece for a quilt set on point? Really?

  2. #2
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    7,024
    Blog Entries
    1
    No. There are plenty of online charts to tell you how to cut it.

  3. #3
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,804
    Here's a chart for setting quilts on-point. Hope this helps.
    http://quiltbug.com/articles/on-point.htm

  4. #4
    MTS
    MTS is offline
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    4,301
    Quote Originally Posted by Valerie Ann View Post
    make the corner piece for a quilt set on point? Really?
    The CORNER TRIANGLE is just a big HST.

    The SETTING TRIANGLE (at the end of the on-point row) is just a big QST .

    Both units are cut from squares (unless the fabric is directional/striped and you want to control the flow of the print design).

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,301
    you can also calculate your own and use any square ruler...measure the length of the side of the on=point block that needs a corner....let's say it measures 10 3/4, or 10.75. (don't forget seam allowances). Use a calculator (unless you have one of those wonderful brains that can do this in your head) and divide that number by the quilter's magic number - 1.414 - and you get the length of one side of a square you need for two setting corners. 10.75 div by 1.414 = 7.6, which is between one half (.5) and 5/8's (.625) so I'd cut a square 7 5/8th's, cut it diagonally in half and you have two corner setting triangles for your corner block that measures 10 3/4 on the side. This gives you a little to trim off....cut a second square this size and you have another two HST's to finish the quilt...and the sides are on the grain. You can trim it off after you stitch if you finger press then match the center point of the block and the triangle - since the diagonal is on the bias, make sure not to stretch, and that you have equal amounts hanging off each end before you sew.
    Kate

  6. #6
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have the super large 30" set in triangle ruler and it saves me a lot of figuring. I can just cut the size of the set in piece according to the size of the blocks. I don't need it but I don't need 95% of the quilting items I buy. I just want them.
    Got fabric?

  7. #7
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,913
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quiltville.com has a chart that printed off. I'm on my smart phone so I can't copy the link.
    No one has ever become poor by giving. - Anne Frank
    Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    http://www.etsy.com/shop/TheQuiltedPig

  8. #8
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,204
    nope, but they work great ;-)
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    722
    The rulers/tools make it easier to cut those triangles out of strip of fabric, not cutting a big square (requiring more fabric)

  10. #10
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,891
    Not a 'need' but a nice addition. You will probably use the ruler frequently once you learn the use. It makes the cutting and piecing go much quicker. I love mine.

    Then if you can use a coupon ... well, what a deal!
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  11. #11
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    Why agonize over buying or not buying a ruler. It's a ruler.
    Got fabric?

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    1,808
    Blog Entries
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I have the super large 30" set in triangle ruler and it saves me a lot of figuring. I can just cut the size of the set in piece according to the size of the blocks. I don't need it but I don't need 95% of the quilting items I buy. I just want them.
    Who makes a ruler that big? Did you get it a quilt show, internet?.....Sounds interesting, more info please. Thanks

  13. #13
    Power Poster gabeway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    10,488
    Not really.
    Wayne & Gabriele, the married quilters.

  14. #14
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Glendale AZ
    Posts
    1,573
    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Quiltville.com has a chart that printed off. I'm on my smart phone so I can't copy the link.

    Bonnie has not only the math to calcutate your own, but a chart with lots of sizes already figured out.

    http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2005/...nt-quilts.html
    Beth in AZ
    www.bzyqltr.blogspot.com
    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  15. #15
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crosby,Texas
    Posts
    837
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I don't need it but I don't need 95% of the quilting items I buy. I just want them.
    hahaaha BellaBoo you are a gadget girl after my own heart.

  16. #16
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I bought the ruler when I was in Paducah at Eleanore Burns quilt store. It's probably on her website. If you are going to Paducah quilt show, Eleanor Burns usually has coupons on her site to use at her downtown store during quilt week.
    Got fabric?

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sun City, AZ
    Posts
    400
    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy View Post
    Here's a chart for setting quilts on-point. Hope this helps.
    http://quiltbug.com/articles/on-point.htm
    Thank you for posting that!

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    60
    I've been wondering about this topic too. A more basic question I'm wondering, is there a better way to cut them grain wise? I've heard of cutting squares on point so the inside quarter triangles are on grain; seems like a lot of work and I'm thinking better to have the grain on the outside edge, right? Any tips on this or am I overthinking it to worry about the grain?

    Also, is it safe to assume that the only time a ruler or the charts come in to play is when you don't already have good pattern directions?

    By the way, window shopping I found a big setting triangle ruler on Nancy's Notions http://www.nancysnotions.com/product/flip+n+set+tool.do that looks nice because it stores folded in half and has a wide range of sizes. Anyone use/recommend this one?

  19. #19
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Glendale AZ
    Posts
    1,573
    Quote Originally Posted by JenF View Post
    I've been wondering about this topic too. A more basic question I'm wondering, is there a better way to cut them grain wise? I've heard of cutting squares on point so the inside quarter triangles are on grain; seems like a lot of work and I'm thinking better to have the grain on the outside edge, right? Any tips on this or am I overthinking it to worry about the grain?
    It totally depends on what edge is most important to you that is NOT bias. I really hate bias on my edges. If the long edge of the triangle is going to be my border edge, then I cut a sq and then in quarters. That makes the short edges bias, and the long leg straight/cross grain. If I want the short legs on the grain, I cut a hst. This makes the long leg bias and the short legs on the grain.

    Here is a good explanation of the differences...and I think there is a calculator to help with cutting measurements:
    http://www.msquilting.com/Half%20Squ...20Square_t.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by JenF View Post
    Also, is it safe to assume that the only time a ruler or the charts come in to play is when you don't already have good pattern directions?
    Alot of patterns, that I consider well written, don't always use the most effecient method or one that works best for me. Sometimes the best/easiest way is not easy to convey or write down. I ALWAYS modify patterns to suit my taste/ability/desire to try new methods/what works for me.

    JMHO
    Beth in AZ
    www.bzyqltr.blogspot.com
    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Mass
    Posts
    301
    That's a handy chart at the quilt bug
    Cindy

  21. #21
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    8,651
    Quote Originally Posted by ewecansew View Post
    The rulers/tools make it easier to cut those triangles out of strip of fabric, not cutting a big square (requiring more fabric)
    Please explain - wouldn't both methods use the same amount of fabric just in a different starting shape? Thanks.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    502
    It is generally easier to cut a 9 inch strip and cut your setting triangles from it, than to cut an 18 inch square and cut it on one or two diagonals. You also only need to buy 9 inches instead of 18.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    502
    But actually you only NEED paper, pencil, scissors, needle and thread, everything else is luxury, but I would not be a quilter without the modern tools. We all choose which tools are most worthwhile to ourselves.

  24. #24
    Super Member GrammaNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,935
    What a great site! Thanks for the tip.
    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy View Post
    Here's a chart for setting quilts on-point. Hope this helps.
    http://quiltbug.com/articles/on-point.htm
    I am too POSITIVE to be doubtful, too OPTIMISTIC to be fearful and way to DETERMINED to be defeated.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.