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Thread: Do "New" Quilt books instruct traditional, or do they incorporate "shortcut" techniqu

  1. #1
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    Do "New" Quilt books instruct traditional, or do they incorporate "shortcut" techniqu

    I've been playing over on youtube a bit, and I see some great shortcuts and different techniques to build blocks or pieces-parts, etc. One that comes to mind is Missouri Star's toot for easy pinwheels by sewing two charms completely around the 4 sides, and cutting "X" across the piece and WAH-LAH! Instant pinwheel parts!
    Another one is linked here in our banner on "Playing with Boston Blocks" and shows how to create the triangle pieces without actually cutting out triangles.

    My question is: Do quilt books tend to incorporate these shortcut techniques, or do they instruct what *I* would call "traditional" ways of piecing?

    I'm also reminded of a thread where one gal was feeling like her guild members were "offish" to her as a young newcomer, and I wondered if it was because, perhaps, there is a generation gap in the quilting arena where more mature quilters have learned these traditional piecing methods, and newer quilters are perhaps all taught the "shortcuts," which the more mature quilters might "pooh-pooh" as not "real" quilting?

    Is there any logic or truth in what I'm trying to say here?

  2. #2
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    There is alot of truth and logic to what you are saying. I say if it works for you then what is the problem!!! I am not sure about the books. I suppose it depends on who is writting it and there way of doing things.

  3. #3
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    My question, do you use scissors or a rotary cutter? Traditional quilters used scissors.
    I say do what works best for you!!
    Marie

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  4. #4
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Good question. I think there are "purists" in any activity and quilting is no exception, but most of us (including authors) live somewhere in the middle. I'm not gluing my applique pieces before using needle turn applique, but I'm not whittling my own needles from bones, either. I would imagine each group has its own style and some folks are simply more accepting than others (or maybe just take a longer view).

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    It really depends on the author. If I like a pattern but do not like the technique used for the piecing, I just use the technique I like and just purchase a little extra fabric to make sure I have enough for my way of doing it.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I think it depends on the book and author - and the age of the book. I have no problem with shortcuts; if I can get there easier, why not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    It really depends on the author. If I like a pattern but do not like the technique used for the piecing, I just use the technique I like and just purchase a little extra fabric to make sure I have enough for my way of doing it.
    I hope to one day know enough about this "way of life" that I recognize that there IS another way of doing (it)

    Quote Originally Posted by JulieR View Post
    Good question. I think there are "purists" in any activity and quilting is no exception, but most of us (including authors) live somewhere in the middle. I'm not gluing my applique pieces before using needle turn applique, but I'm not whittling my own needles from bones, either. I would imagine each group has its own style and some folks are simply more accepting than others (or maybe just take a longer view).
    Funny you should say that...if my dad had his way, we'd still be haying the back field with draft horses (I kid you not).
    Last edited by Teeler; 01-14-2013 at 12:34 PM. Reason: Edit to add....

  8. #8
    Super Member OKLAHOMA PEACH's Avatar
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    I think short cuts are used as they become established by quilt designers and authors, but I have several old, I mean old quilting books that have the same shortcuts that some are putting forth as new or their own ideas.

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    To the first question about tips/techniques to use when making a quilt top - some do, some don't.

    To the second question - I don't think that 'old' techniques vs 'new' techniques has a thing to do with the personality of a particular group of quilters. People are people, and most of us tend to associate with the people who are most like ourselves. That can make 'new comers' feel unwelcome in a particular group, and, in fact, sometimes a new comer is unwelcome. But just as often, it's not intentional, it's just a personality mis-match.

    So we keep going until we find (or begin) the right group for us.

  10. #10
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    If you're buying a book online, take a look at when it was published. I would say that anything published in the last ten years would have the newer shortcut methods that you like. If you have a chance to actually examine a quilting book, they always have a techniques section and you can make your determination from that. I've been quilting for 40 years and absolutely love the new shortcut techniques and the modern quilt movement in general even though I started out with the traditional quilts and methods.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  11. #11
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    I am 67 years old (I'm taking every single one of the 14 more days til 68 that I have left!), have been quilting 32 years and teaching, designing, writing for about 29 of those years. I learned from a forerunner of the 'new' quilting craze who eschewed scissors, templates, and hand piecing and I still teach "modern", fast, speed piecing, trick and techniques at my guild where the workshops are always well received and even asked for.

    Go to your local library and read thru as many quilting books that have been printed after, say, 1995 as you can find. Look especially through Quilters Newsletter Magazine and American Quilter magazine for 'on trend' news and skills. A subscription to American Quilter is a benefit of membership in the American Quilters Society.

    Please realize that the internet, while a truly wonderful resource, is not the only source for the information you are requesting. You seem so eager, I think you'll have a great time going thru these things.

    Jan in VA
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  12. #12
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Always pay attention to what Jan in VA has to say.

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    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Quick and new techniques are always of interest to me, and I often get online and grab my rotary cutter and piece away on my machine. However, at night you will find me working on my GFG and cutting hexies out of scrap paper with scissors. I have books old and new and dip in and out and adapt as I go. I think many of us do this.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenheron View Post
    Always pay attention to what Jan in VA has to say.
    SuperJan!!!

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    I recently picked up a book published in 1992 called something like "Joy of Quilting" (and I am a retired librarian!). I was horrified to see that the instructions for a scrap quilt told you to cut each square out with scissors and then piece. Even though there were some nice designs I decided that book should go to the recycling bin rather than the charity shop, in case a new quilter was led astray and quit in frustration.
    At our quilting group I sometimes show some of the newer methods I have learned from this board like the easy pinwheels and disappearing 9 patch, and I can tell that some of the older members are just polite -- not really interested in the changes -- but that's OK -- they are much better quilters than I will ever be -- I'm a bit slapdash.

  16. #16
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Greenheron, Peckish,
    You two gotta quit this, now, LOL! You're going to have me too embarrassed to post pretty soon.

    But it's really nice to know there are others who appreciate what one has to say; thank you.

    Jan in VA (blushing)
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    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by gspsplease View Post
    I recently picked up a book published in 1992 called something like "Joy of Quilting" (and I am a retired librarian!). I was horrified to see that the instructions for a scrap quilt told you to cut each square out with scissors and then piece. Even though there were some nice designs I decided that book should go to the recycling bin rather than the charity shop, in case a new quilter was led astray and quit in frustration.
    At our quilting group I sometimes show some of the newer methods I have learned from this board like the easy pinwheels and disappearing 9 patch, and I can tell that some of the older members are just polite -- not really interested in the changes -- but that's OK -- they are much better quilters than I will ever be -- I'm a bit slapdash.
    Altho I lean toward traditional patterns, I also look for the quickest way to get there........so if I read a pattern that seems to be the old fashioned way to me, I look for the more up-to-date way...nowadays I am trying to translate as many as I can into GO die cutting............

  18. #18
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    I have been quilting about 40 years and quickly got tired of driving myself crazy trying to accurately piece etc. Fabric is not a finate medium, it stretches, shrinks and has a grain. The part I like best is the handquilting. I love the advent of preprinted "cheaters cloth" I purchase some yardage of it, slap on some borders and start quilting. When I get finished only a real quilter with a sharp eye can tell it wasn't carefully pieced before being quilted. The quilting process is also a lot easier without those many seams to traverse. The original idea about "patchwork" was to use up the fabric no woman could afford to discard. It is truly an American idea. If you look at quilted items made before there was an American country it was "wholecloth" and made into wallhangings, coverlets and even padding to be worn under armour etc. Thrifty American homemakers came up with the idea of using their leftover scraps from garment and home sewing to make attractive yet practical bedding. Developing patterns was their way of expressing themselves and also being practical.

  19. #19
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    Eleanor Burns is always first in line with simple and easier ways to do quilting.
    I have adapted her ways to patterns like Dear Jane.
    The 8 at a time way to do HSTs I use all the time. I have all of her flying geese rulers. No more problems with both of these basic patterns.

  20. #20
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    Greenheron, Peckish,
    You two gotta quit this, now, LOL!

    Jan in VA (blushing)
    I'm really sorry, Jan, I don't mean to keep embarrassing you. But quite honestly you deserve the respect and admiration. You are always helpful, complimentary, and instructive, and you're never mean or snarky. You're the opposite of Quilt Police; you explain very succinctly why it's best to do some things a certain way, but you always do it in a kind manner. In my opinion, Greenheron is doing newbies and beginners a favor by telling them to pay attention to what you say.

  21. #21
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Peggi,
    I enjoy compliments! You and a few others have so particularly generous with them; it's rewarding and validating - the best part of receiving a compliment - and I really do feel all warm inside when I read them. Thank you, thank you, really. I LOVE teaching and helping newbies, that's my personal passion. There are also other members here with amazing skills and opinions, too, because we are the best, luckiest, most gentile, and well-behaved membership of any internet board on the planet.

    So, whether it makes me blush or not, keep on reading us and learning (and, yes, even tooting the horn!)

    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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