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Thread: Do you McTavish?

  1. #26
    lin
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    Thank you Suz. What a nice thing to say! :)

    You're picking a mighty small brain this morning, :lol: but let me see if I can answer your new questions...

    If I'm doing an all-over pattern (at least in the main body of the quilt) I will always start in the upper right hand corner, (I usually do the borders first. That seems to keep my quilt squared nicely) and work my way across to the left for about 14" then down, and back again to the right until I've finished that whole section down to the bottom of the quilt. When I'm doing sitd, I prefer pulling the quilt towards my lap. For some reason I'm more comfortable that direction, but if I'm doing all over it doesn't seem to matter as much because I'm changing directions all the time. If I'm doing a pattern in each individual block, then I can start anywhere, but usually start from the block in the top right corner as well. I don't always stop half-way and then turn. It depends on the size of the quilt. If I'm still comfortable with the amount of quilt I'm stuffing into the throat area, I'll keep going. I stop and turn when it gets awkward.

    Once again, it depends on the design of the quilt, but I often do sitd around individual blocks if I'm treating each block independently. I'll keep the background going if I'm not doing anything different from block to block. So far I've only used the McTavishing as an all-over design in the background areas around blocks that were treated separately. :) I think it's just up to the individual doing the quilting. No wrongs or rights, just what looks good to you. In that first "attempt" pic you'll notice a small area that was cross-hatched. That's because the quilt I was fixing to do had applique blocks that I was going to do the cross-hatching in, and I wanted to be sure that it would look good in the middle of all that intense McTing. I often will do a small sample of what I'm putting in the quilt to see if the designs are all going to play well together. :)

    I always hand baste my quilts. I personally find it awkward to have to stop and remove pins when I'm on a roll! LOL With the thread basting, I can simply make a quick snip of the threads that are in that 14" area I'll be working on, and in one easy motion pull them all out at once. I hardly know I'm doing it anymore. It becomes automatic. If I DO happen to forget to pull a thread out, it doesn't hurt to cross over it and pull it out later. I've never had a problem with thread breaking when I cross over one except when I attempted to use dissolvable thread and didn't snip it as I went. That was a disaster!! That type of thread obviously doesn't split well and I had a real mess on my hands with thread breaking and shredding and yanking my needle and even breaking a few. It took me longer than it should have to realize I should quit doing that and snip the threads like I did on regular threads. I can be stubborn and dense sometimes!! :lol:

    Was this little novella long enough for you? LOL Between Carla and myself, we're taking up a lot of space here! :mrgreen: Have you done much machine quilting? If not, I hope you'll give it a try. I love to hand quilt, but I'm also so glad I learned to do the m-quilting. It's lots faster!!! LOL

  2. #27
    Suz
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    Carla and Lin,

    Thank you so much. I have copied all of the comments to a folder although I haven't read all that you wrote as yet. I need to go to it, clean it up and print and then study and study. I'll let you know how I make out when I take needle to fabric.

    Space!! Yes, but well worth the information provided. I'll try to keep my questions a little shorter. :wink:

    Gals, this is why this forum is so valuable with "Valued" quilting sisters like you willing to share. We all appreciate your time in helping us.

    Suzanne

  3. #28
    lin
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    I forgot that you asked about the name of her book. I have it out on loan to a friend right now so I'm not 100% sure, but I think it's just McTavishing by Karen McTavish. I'm not sure how long the book has been on the market, but I don't think it's been too long.

    I'm thrilled to be able to contribute something to this board Suz. Most of the time I'm perusing the threads for good info that I can apply to my own quilting. There are so many talented men and women on here that every single day I can find something to help me in this craft. :D

    Never stop asking!! What works for one of us might not work for all, but if I see something that looks like it will make my life easier, or my quilts prettier, I sure am glad I have that info to at least try. I can't tell you how inspired I am by some of the newer quilters on this board! They amaze me, and certainly have many things of value to share. :D

  4. #29
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    her books are listed at the website. she offers stencils, too.

    http://www.designerquilts.com/mctavish.html

  5. #30
    Suz
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    The book and CD "Mastering the Art of McTavishing" is available on sale at Connecting Threads for $17.46 in case anyone is looking for it.

    I will be ordering mine along with some thread they are offering: 1200 yards of 50/3 Egyptian cotton for $1.99 a spool or 8 spools for $15.90. The color selection is wonderful. I also noticed that they have the fork pin discussed in another subject.

    Suzanne


  6. #31
    Carla P's Avatar
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    The thread is called Essentials & you'll love the quality of it. It is a great thread.

  7. #32
    lin
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    Thank you so much for that information Suz. Sorry I got the name of the book wrong :oops: but I'm glad you found it!! And that sounds like a really good deal on the thread. I've never tried that kind before, but I sure would like to. It's been recommended by another top machine quilter, Diane Gaudynski in Jan/Feb '07 edition of Quiltmaker magazine. If you can get your hands on that issue it would be well worth it for you! I learned how to do free-form feathers from that article. Something I thought I could never, ever do! She recommends a Schmetz #70 Microtex Sharp for the 60wt Egyptian cotton threads. I love that there's so much help out there now for those of us who want to take this up on our domestics at home. :)

    I'll warn you that the CD included with the book isn't the highest quality, but you don't really need the sound to be that good anyway, as it's the visual that will do you the most good. I got a kick out of her on the CD. I thought she was funny and really down to earth. I'm so happy you're going to persue this!

  8. #33
    Suz
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    Lin,

    You can go to their website: www.connectingthreads.com and/or call 1-800-574-6454 to order or just to order a catalog.

    Suzanne

  9. #34
    lin
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    Thanks Suz! I used to get their catalogue all the time, but haven't in quite awhile. I appreciate the link and number.

  10. #35
    Super Member nanabirdmo's Avatar
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    oh my, if these are your first attempts, you can come quilt me any time :mrgreen:

  11. #36
    lin
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    Thank you nanabird! I'm assuming you meant "quilt for me" and not "quilt me" :lol: :lol: If not, I'll be gentle, I promise. :mrgreen:

    I love funny typos. LOL

    I appreciate your kind words. :)

  12. #37
    Super Member nanabirdmo's Avatar
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    i did mean "quilt me" :D . i just have a weird sense of humor. just imagine if we could quilt up these old bodies like our grandmas quilted up their old clothes and gave them new life. 8)

  13. #38
    lin
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    Oh, ok! :lol: In that case, I'll be very gentle. Promise.

    You've got a point though. If someone could just do a little lifting here...a little tucking there...:mrgreen:

  14. #39
    Super Member jbsstrawberry's Avatar
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    Does that mean plastic surgeons are quilters? :P

  15. #40
    lin
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbsstrawberry
    Does that mean plastic surgeons are quilters? :P
    ...If only we made that kind of money :!:

  16. #41
    Super Member Celeste's Avatar
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    Lin,
    Those samples are stunning! Just beautiful! They would make pretty pillows or doll quilts. . .

  17. #42
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i already look quilted. McTavished in some places; stippled in others. and my batting has shifted and bunched somethin' fierce!!! :x

    i need nipped, tucked, trapuntoed, and professionally pressed!!!! :shock:

  18. #43
    Junior Member jessiesmom's Avatar
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    Wow!! Great questions and fantastic answers. Thanks Dont ever be sorry for taking up so much space with those kind of answers. Thats how us newbies learn from you pro's. Thanks again. Give us more

    Mary

  19. #44
    lin
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    Celeste~thank you very much! I hadn't thought about doing anything with the samples. I've just been keeping them to show anyone who wants to learn the technique. Goodness knows I've got enough g-daughters with dolls, I should take your advice!

    Patrice~LOL...Ummm, no. You look just fine the way you are. Remember? We've seen your pic. :P If you got nipped or tucked, you'd disappear!! :lol:

    Mary~I'm really glad you were able to get some good information from the answers you found on this thread. :)

  20. #45
    Super Member jbsstrawberry's Avatar
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    Patrice...ohhh my goodness!!! LMBO Thanks so much!! I truly needed that smile this morning!

  21. #46
    Suz
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    Lin and Carla,

    Thanks for your expert and experienced-based responses. I have pulled and printed all that you have offered. You have encouraged many of us to get started and so many different approaches, i.e., turning to face the arm and doodling. I can hardly wait to get the book.

    Just a few further questions: Do you use a special "slip sheet" on the machine bed to help with drag? I find when the humidity is up, the drag is increased. I've been using Pledge wax and it helps some. How do you deal with this? if at all?

    Do you wear the gloves with the "nubbies" on the palms and fingers? Mine are red!!!! Pretty hip for this old gray-haired lady!

    I promise no more questions. Suzanne

  22. #47
    lin
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    I welcome your questions Suz! It's nice to see someone so excited about trying out a new technique. :) You're very welcome for whatever advice I've given that can be helpful.

    I've never experienced any drag while m-quing. My mother's machine has a very slippery surface, so there was never a problem there, and I have also not had any problems with the Juki. It's got a metal bed, and even though the extension is plastic, it's very smooth. I do make sure that the bed is very clean before I begin. I've heard of others doing what you do, waxing it a bit before they start. Whatever works for you without hurting your machine is great!

    I tried using gloves and found I wasn't comfortable at all. I have been quilting without them for so long that it felt awkward and bulky. The ones I tried were the Fons and Porter gloves, which I understand are thinner than some and not so cumbersome, but even still, I felt I had more control with bare hands. I use a product called Sortkwik that I get at the office supply store. You could also check to see if W-mart carries it. It makes my hands sticky enough to keep a good grip on the fabric, but it doesn't leave any stains or residue on the fabric. I love the stuff. My students have had success with it as well. If you're already using gloves, then you're probably getting used to them and you'll be comfortable using them right from the start, which is great. I say whatever works for the individual Suz. I'd quilt with my feet if it would improve my technique! LOL

    I can't wait to see some of your practice swatches. I hope you have as much fun with this as I do and I also hope that you will allow yourself to play around with what Karen does, and make it your own. :)

  23. #48
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    Bumping for my own reference! :mrgreen:

  24. #49

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    WOW, BEAUTIFUL, How labor intensive is that. Dose the loft of the batting have anything to do with the effect? Appears to be a doer, with the quilt as you go. How hard would it be to try and do the full quilt at once?

  25. #50
    lin
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    I think trying it out on a quilt as you go first is a great idea Rebecca! It wasn't that hard on my swatches and I got good practice that way before taking it to a large quilt. I didn't find it any harder to do the stitching on a larger quilt, just the usual complaints about doing a large quilt on a domestic. ;) Bulky, awkward, etc. The same for any type stitching I've done so far. LOL

    I think the loft would make a huge difference. If you were to use a heavier cotton or even a wool, you'd probably see the "poofs" inbetween the stitching better than the low loft cotton I used. I mean, you could see the design and all, it just wasn't as dramatic. The only problem I can see with using a higher loft cotton would be that it might get stiff with all the thread used. I'm not actually sure if that would happen because all I've used is a really thin bat so far, but it just seems like it wouldn't drape nice. I'm dying to do this with wool!! I hope it will still drape nicely. The only problem I have with a really thin bat, is that after all the hours the top has to spend under my warm hands and the hot machine light, it tends to soften and stretch some, and if you're not working from the inside out, you can wind up with a bit too much top for the back at the end and reallllly have to "ease" it in.

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