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Thread: Do you stitch around quilt before trimming and binding

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    I was just wondering if we are supposed to sew close to the edge of the quilt before trimming it and applying the binding. I have noticed several videos on you tube about applying binding but no one ever mentions if you are supposed to sew down the edge of the quilt

  2. #2
    Super Member lfw045's Avatar
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    I do. I find that it prevents slipping and tucks.

  3. #3
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    i do because i quilt on a frame and bast the edges as i go (most of the time) it does make applying the binding easier having everything nice and flat on that edge

  4. #4
    Super Member CoriAmD's Avatar
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    I learned to do this watching a Fons & Porter quilting show once. It is especially helpful when I attach the binding to the back first and roll it over to front.

  5. #5
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    If I have quilted on the LA I have tacking stitches all around the edge anyway. When FMQ on my DSM I usually have quilted so close to the edges that it isn't necessary. Hand quilting, it all depends how densely I have quilted the border and how "loose" things appear around the edges. I will make a judgement call if I find it necessary or not.

  6. #6
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    A lot depends on the tightness of the weave of the fabric and if it has borders or not. I am currently handquilting a quilt whose top was made of loosely woven feed sacks. A lady at the Senior center donated it to benefit the center. It had no borders. I took it home and stay stitched he whole outside before washing it to be sure it would not fall apart. I then pressed it and added a solid border on all four sides. I currently have it more than three quarter of the way handquilted and it is doing fine.
    Staystitching is a good idea if there are no solid borders or if the blocks have a lot of bias edges. It is mostly a judgement call.

  7. #7
    Super Member oatw13's Avatar
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    I usually quilt to the edge, so I generally do not stitch around the outside again.

  8. #8
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    If the quilting is dense, there will be less chance for slipping, I don't. If the quilting is looser with bigger areas not quilted right at the edge, I do.

  9. #9
    Super Member KarenK's Avatar
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    I do. I always use a narrow zigzag stitch. It flattens the edge and makes it easier to apply the binding.

  10. #10
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    I attach the binding, then trim

  11. #11
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
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    I usually do a small zig-zag stitch very close to the edge. That way I don't worry so much about the backing not being caught in the binding. I do mostly echo or stitch in the ditch quilting, so my edges are rarely quilted.

  12. #12
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    I do. Helps keep everything in place when I attach the binding.

  13. #13
    KrystelsQuilts's Avatar
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    I have to say that 90% of the time I do stitch around I like having the flatness to bind to.

  14. #14
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Yes, most of the time I do too :D:D:D

  15. #15
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I do , I use a larger stitch about a 3.5 or 4 , it just makes everything easier. It's time/effort well spent.

  16. #16
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    I stitch! I've had some that didn't have enough quilting around the edges to keep it flat and ended up with puckers or pleats when I applied the binding.

  17. #17
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I use my serger to neaten up the outside edges and trim at the same time.

  18. #18
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I did with my second quilt. I didn't bind my first quilt (tucked the edges under 1/4" and sewed a straight stitch). I had probably read somewhere that sewing around the edge would make putting on the binding easier. I guess it made it a little easier as I had some sort of guide to line my binding up with.

  19. #19
    Junior Member quilt'nmomma's Avatar
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    I don't but I'm going to start. I find that if I am sewing the binding on with the machine I have problems with the edge of the quilt not getting caught in my sewing. Therefore it is sticking out of the binding. The last couple I have done I did the binding by hand and liked the look a lot better.

  20. #20
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    Good information. I have never heard of doing this before and I think it would make things easier when attaching the binding.

  21. #21
    Senior Member GrammaO's Avatar
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    I didn't used to but I read here on the Board that all lot of you use your serger to serge the edges before binding. I tried it on my last two quilts and I was very pleased with how much quicker and smoother my binding went on, so now I plan to do that with all my quilts.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathy
    i do because i quilt on a frame and bast the edges as i go (most of the time) it does make applying the binding easier having everything nice and flat on that edge
    I do this also. If I don't use the frame, I do baste around edges whe I baste the whole quilt .

  23. #23
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I measure from the last border toward the edge and mark. I sew a zig zag stitch around and then trim a straight edge. It helps keeps the binding perfectly straight.

  24. #24
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I mark the cutting edge with a permanent Sharpie first, then sew around the edge close to the marked line, either a little inside or a little outside the marked line. I do *not* trim before attaching binding; I attach binding for the first side using the marked line to line up the raw edge of the binding. Only after attaching the binding do I finally trim the edges, being *very* careful not to nick any of the binding fabric (especially at the corners).

    Waiting to trim allows me to adjust the width of the sandwich in the binding to make sure it will will the binding the way I like it. Also, then I don't have to deal with cut edges of the quilt sandwich rippling or getting ragged from handling.

    I noticed that when I cut first and then stitched around the edge, I was still likely to get some sliding, distortion and tucks because the sewing line is *so* close to the edge. The way I do it, just marking the cutting line without cutting, makes the edge much more stable while I work with it.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Mary M's Avatar
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    I do a long basting stitch around the edge before I trim the edges. Keeps it together very nicely.

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