Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 113

Thread: Does anyone not do large quilts because

  1. #76
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    10,356
    Quote Originally Posted by raptureready
    Nope, as hard as they are to finish I do big ones because I think most smaller things are useless. I like to do QAYG or strip quilting, sometimes (especially for couch throws) I like to tie them.

    I apologize to all the wall hanging, table runner, quilted artworks, etc., creators out there. They're beautiful and if that's what you enjoy that's fine with me, I just prefer making bed quilts.
    I am with Raptureready on this one...I too admire all the other forms of quilting, but for me I like my quilts to be on beds, chairs or couches. I make them to keep people warm and give comfort.

  2. #77
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Macon, Ga
    Posts
    273
    I do bedsize quilts and hand quilt them, trying to quilt a little each day, and that gets the job done. I have also machined some with very simple quilting. I also like to do wall quilts, throws, table runners, etc., because it is fun to use a new technique to make them. I must admit that I have run out of wall space to hang them, but I swap them out periodically for a change.

  3. #78
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,061
    I have read several articles lately about big stitch quilting. The stitches are larger and therefore the quilting goes much faster. Might be worth a try.

  4. #79
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,755
    Blog Entries
    9
    Nope..I do large quilts and I quilt them myself on my little domestic machine. Some get a little difficult to handle in the center part, but I've found that if I can do it using the kitchen table and an ironing board to hold the quilt up...then I'm good to go.

    I've hand quilted a queen (my 1st quilt)..then started trying to machine quilt. I like to vary the sizes of my quilts and also the techniques...it keeps it interesting for me. I get bored easily. :roll:

  5. #80
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Roxbury, Ma
    Posts
    10,360
    I have large quilts in progress but I love the baby quilts and have made several of them because they whip us so quickly. I do like large quilts but do hesitate to start one only because they take soooooo long.

  6. #81
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    8,253
    When I learned to "puddle" my quilt instead of rolling the edges, I was off and running,. No more too expensive long arm quilters for me. I can now do it myself. Only took a little practice to learn how to puddle.

  7. #82
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Adelanto, CA
    Posts
    4,063
    I have heard that 'newbie' long arm quilters will quilt for lower prices as a way to practice with their new machines and designs.... they should disclose that they are new, and you need to know that it won't be as perfect as a seasoned long arm quilter.

    sue in CA

  8. #83
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queensland Australia
    Posts
    1,387
    When I made my queen size quilt I just stipple quilted it. Can you do it as a quilt as you go? being so big cutting the size down will make it easier to sew and no extra weight making it harder to sew.If you sew in the ditch, do it as a quilt as you go,it will be quicker and easier than stipple stitch. I also make little quilts for babies but only decent single big sized quilts will do in case I have family staying over.

  9. #84
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Forest Grove,OR
    Posts
    6,572
    Blog Entries
    1
    I quilt all my projects, and will continue to do so, do to no money, I just did fmq on the doll quilt I posted. I practice rose buds and leafs. God bless. Penny

  10. #85
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bardstown Ky
    Posts
    664
    Blog Entries
    2
    butterflyblue, You said that you quilt as you go, Would you elaborate on how you do that? I've heard of this method but I haven't had anyone explain it to me. I would really appreciate it if you would tell me how to do this . thanks

  11. #86
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queensland Australia
    Posts
    1,387
    quilt as you go is where you divide your quilt top into sections and quilt each section as if it was a little quilt. then you sew it back together into one big quilt. There different methods but if you ask some of your quilt friends closer to you, they might be able to show you how to do it. It is hard to explain unless I could show you. If you still get Simply Quilts, there was a show dealing with different ways of how to do it. There is a little bit of hand stitching involved when sewing the back seams together. Sorry.

  12. #87
    Gal
    Gal is offline
    Super Member Gal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand in the South Pacific
    Posts
    1,117
    My very first quilt was a QS, machine pieced and hand quilted, I was amazed at how fast it came together as I kept at it! Not the most perfect quilt in the world but I learned heaps, got better at hand quilting along the way and realised that with just my humble 'lap hoop' I could do it! I have never looked back and much prefer to make larger quilts than smaller ones. I love to hand quilt and found this out only because I did not know how to machine quilt at the time, my DH bought me a hoop and I had not ever tried it out, and bingo, once I did that was it, HOOKED!

    Gal

  13. #88
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queensland Australia
    Posts
    1,387
    I also agree with you. every one in my family have big beds and I think any smaller than a double is a waste if time unless it is a baby quilt and even then I make them 40+ inches and with some feature that will be alright when they are teenagers. I have designed a quilt using teen ballet dancers in dressed in all colors, But I made the blocks are 12inches and 5 blocks across with a pink border since the baby will be a girl. I also am trying to do a boys quilt with a tractor in the middle and other blocks with cats, dogs etc scattered around. I hope I get it sorted out before his sister arrives.

  14. #89
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    CT New Haven County
    Posts
    1,495
    Quote Originally Posted by IBQUILTIN
    When I learned to "puddle" my quilt instead of rolling the edges, I was off and running,. No more too expensive long arm quilters for me. I can now do it myself. Only took a little practice to learn how to puddle.
    What is puddling?

  15. #90
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    San Antonio Texas
    Posts
    1,060
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Janie Q
    I made king size quilt and it will be the last. I felt like I was drowning in fabric by the time I got the borders on. I'm short and have athritis in my shoulders its just too hard to manage something that big. I make twin to small queen sizes.
    I have a cal king on my bed, but just the top, and wondering how I am going to quilt it. Will probably just tie it off and sew around the last border. Wow what a project.

  16. #91
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Bridgewater, MA
    Posts
    97
    If you can do free motion quilting, here's an idea I got from a LQS staff member. Spray baste (with 505 or something similar) and sandwich just the middle part of your large quilt (top to bottom). That leaves the two outer sides of your quilt top and backing with no batting yet and very easy to still manage the quilt with less bulk. After you finish that middle section, add batting and spray baste one of the sides and do that section allowing you to keep the bulk of what has been completed to the left of your machine, again making it easier to handle. Complete the other side in the same manner. Make sense?

  17. #92
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Cloud, Minnesota
    Posts
    1,653
    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14
    Quote Originally Posted by IBQUILTIN
    When I learned to "puddle" my quilt instead of rolling the edges, I was off and running,. No more too expensive long arm quilters for me. I can now do it myself. Only took a little practice to learn how to puddle.
    What is puddling?
    Basically, you slide the quilt under your pressure foot, do not roll it. Spread your fingers out around the needle to flatten the quilt area to fmq just that space. After you complete that area, stop w/ the needle down, arrange the next area, place hands splayed out around needle and con't. Leah Day has a good video that shows this method. Her website is : www.daystyledesigns.com

  18. #93
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    CT New Haven County
    Posts
    1,495
    Quote Originally Posted by fireworkslover
    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14
    Quote Originally Posted by IBQUILTIN
    When I learned to "puddle" my quilt instead of rolling the edges, I was off and running,. No more too expensive long arm quilters for me. I can now do it myself. Only took a little practice to learn how to puddle.
    What is puddling?
    Basically, you slide the quilt under your pressure foot, do not roll it. Spread your fingers out around the needle to flatten the quilt area to fmq just that space. After you complete that area, stop w/ the needle down, arrange the next area, place hands splayed out around needle and con't. Leah Day has a good video that shows this method. Her website is : www.daystyledesigns.com
    OH! I do that now! Didn't know there was a technique for it - cool! I will definitely watch the video to improve that skill - thanks!

  19. #94

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    3
    I do small art quilts, crib size, full size and large queen/king size quilts, but I quilt them all myself. At first I was intimidated, but after I quilted my first quilt and realized it wasn't so bad, just time consuming, I just decided from that point on to quilt all my own quilts. Actually, it can be quite theraputic.

  20. #95
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,224
    [quote=sandpat]Nope..I do large quilts and I quilt them myself on my little domestic machine. Some get a little difficult to handle in the center part, but I've found that if I can do it using the kitchen table and an ironing board to hold the quilt up...then I'm good to go.


    That is what I do too. I utilize everything I can: chairs, table and so on to hold up my quilt while I am quilting. Usually I do mine on my domestic machine too but once in a while I like to hand quilt. It is relaxing to do hand work.

  21. #96
    Senior Member wendsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    607
    I tend to do smaller projects, my bed's a twin sized so the quilts aren't too bad. I try to sew in smalled sections, joining with sashing once completed. I've tried my version on cotton theory(mix between cotton theory and french seam) to join the pieces together.Still a lot to handle but not so much material going through the small arm of my sewing machine. My sister makes rag quilts-just keep adding pieces/boarders to expand to right side. She has found that she likes to sew a final binding-giving it a more "finished" look instead of an ongoing project look.

  22. #97
    cc
    cc is offline
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    27
    Yes, I only make small items because of my limited quilting ability and my extremely limited sewing space. I've realized I'll just have to save the money to pay a professional quilter to do my larger projects. Nice to hear I'm not the only one!

  23. #98
    Member JustBonnie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Grove, OK
    Posts
    99
    Back before Long-Arm quilters came on the scene, I used to hand quilt my large quilts by quilting them in pieces. Usually in 3 to six pieces. Then put them together in the Quilt-as-you-Go method. It worked for me. But now there are Long-Arm quilters, bless their souls!! I'll never quilt anything over 20 inches again!! YAY!!!

  24. #99
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queensland Australia
    Posts
    1,387
    That is one of the quilt as you go techniques I saw on Simply Quilts with Alex Anderson. I tried it in works, but I like to do the quilt in sections and join it after I quilt them separately. Much easier.

  25. #100
    Super Member jbj137's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Duncan, SC, 29334 USA
    Posts
    4,567
    Blog Entries
    2
    I hand quilt and make big ones always (queen or king).
    But I do them in 2 strips and then join them.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.