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Thread: Does anyone remember?

  1. #26
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    I remember them too! The only problem with them was if you had any stretch to your fabric and it would short you.... The tension when pulling it through the machine stretched the fabric...

  2. #27
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Some fabric stores could stand to use this machine. I ordered 7 yards of fabric and
    was 10 inches short (I measured twice). I thought that was a bit much. I don't expect
    anything extra even though some stores are quite generous when they measure but
    give me the quantity I paid for darn it. Anyway, not sure if I want to place another
    order with them. Good thing I always buy a little extra. Maybe they use a different
    yard stick. Grrr.

  3. #28
    Super Member Grandma58's Avatar
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    Yes I do as well. Those were the days.

  4. #29
    Super Member frarose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsBoats View Post
    Yup. Sew-Fro Fabric had them when I was a kid. Our local Hancock's uses something like it on the table roller where they cut upholstery fabric.
    I was going to say the same thing. My Hancocks has one for upholstery fabric also.
    Fran
    http://franciesboutique.blogspot.com/

  5. #30
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy View Post
    Some fabric stores could stand to use this machine. I ordered 7 yards of fabric and
    was 10 inches short (I measured twice). I thought that was a bit much. I don't expect
    anything extra even though some stores are quite generous when they measure but
    give me the quantity I paid for darn it. Anyway, not sure if I want to place another
    order with them. Good thing I always buy a little extra. Maybe they use a different
    yard stick. Grrr.
    Did you contact them and tell them? And what was the response?
    If laughter is the best medicine, I prescribe a Dachshund or four.

  6. #31
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
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    Many years ago when I lived in northern New Jersey we had a fabric shop called the Rag Shop and they had those machines. Often wondered why they weren't in all fabric stores.

  7. #32
    Super Member cowgirlquilter's Avatar
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    Oh my gosh some of the earliest memories I have regarding pretty fabric were based on my momma and me going to the local jc Penney store where they used one of those machines!!!!!!
    Theressa
    Cowgirlquilter

  8. #33
    Senior Member AprilG's Avatar
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    I remember them too. I was fascinated by them. Boy, are we showing our age!!! Like fine wine, we just keep getting better! LOL
    April
    Is there a doctor in the house? I just got bit by the quilting bug!

  9. #34
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    I remember them too. Wonder why they quit using them?

  10. #35
    Super Member Rumbols's Avatar
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    I remember that machine but I don't recall what it was called. Hancock Fabrics here in Cincinnati (the store no longer exists now) used to have one and they always tore the fabric instread of cutting as the manager said he didn't want to use up the scissors cutting fabric, he would rather sell them. This one gal at Hancock used to add a couple of inches (3+) for error sake before cutting and not charge for the extra inches. I also remember when the fabric was not square on the bolt, we used to take opposite corners of the fabric and stretch it when damp and press into shape before using/ Thanks for the reminder.

  11. #36
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    This brings back memories of my mom shopping a fabric stores. I didn't have too many store bought items. Mom made almost all of my clothes.

  12. #37
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaR View Post
    At least with it you get the exact amount of fabric not short on fabric when you got home.
    Well... theoretically. It's still possible to pull the fabric too taut and stretch it a bit going through the measuregraph. This is especially the case with stretch fabrics like lycra. Once they relax, they are shorter.

    I loved seeing the old machine! Thank you to whoever found the photo...
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  13. #38
    Super Member ShowMama's Avatar
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    My local JCPenney also had one and I remember being fascinated by that thing. It was so neat to watch the fabric being pulled through, making the dial spin. Then the lever that would make a little cut on the edge. Just fascinating! I can't imagine why fabric stores don't use that still.
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  14. #39
    Member Jessie 2's Avatar
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    I remember that also, I think it was in Ben Franklen store ( I know I did not spell that right) LOL
    Jessie

  15. #40
    Senior Member cheaha39's Avatar
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    OK, while we are remembering, do you remember that the salesgirl put you cash and the hand witten sales slip in a vacumn tube. The tube made a scary noise, when she opened the bottom door and sent the air shuttle on it's way. Soon a whir and a clunk anounced that your change was back. Montgomery Wards was the best..
    With quilters for friends, I will always be warm.

  16. #41
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    Yes I remember that machine, but I don't know what it was called. It was an accurate way to measure, and ripping the fabric was a straight and accurate way to separate it from the bolt. Aaaah the good old days!

  17. #42
    Super Member Val in IN's Avatar
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    About a million years ago, I worked at House of Fabrics in So. Calif. We used those gizmos and ripped the fabric after it was notched. Fabric was 36" wide and most of it was under $1.00 a yd. That was in the late 60's to early 70's. Like I said, a million years ago(lol).
    "I've always been crazy, but it's kept me from going insane!"
    Valarie

  18. #43
    Senior Member roadrunr's Avatar
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    I remember the machine that measured fabric - it was very accurate, not like today when they measurewith a yeard stick on the table and everyone starts at a diffferent point.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsBoats View Post
    Yup. Sew-Fro Fabric had them when I was a kid. Our local Hancock's uses something like it on the table roller where they cut upholstery fabric.

    I worked at So-Fro here in Ft.Wayne, back in the earlier 70's and remember using it.

  20. #45
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    Donna: Thank you! This is exactly it. Thanks to all of you that walked down memory lane with me. It's no fun going there all by yourself!

    Quote Originally Posted by Up North View Post

  21. #46
    Junior Member Julie in WA's Avatar
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    Our Joanns uses an updated version of this in the upholstery department. Brings back memories of when I was a kid!

  22. #47
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Up North View Post
    Thanks, Donna...I remember the stores using these...I was in a couple of small town stores in the 90's and remember them still using these.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  23. #48
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    Yes, but wish I were too young to remember!

  24. #49
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    I too remember the good old days. When my mom bought fabric, it was usually at Woolworth's or JCPenneys, and they used them. I think I will suggest that they bring them back to Joann's. Always short. GGRRRRR

  25. #50
    Senior Member Earleen's Avatar
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    Boy this post brings back memories. I remember it well.
    Earleen The best helping hand is at the end of your arm.

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