Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 58

Thread: Easier way to Dresden?

  1. #1
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475

    Easier way to Dresden?

    I love the happy feeling Dresden plates give me, especially the scrappy ones.
    But it is so tedious to applique all those petals (16X each plate). Is there an easier way to do it?
    The pointy ones are much easier, but I prefer the look of the rounded petals.
    Any tips? Thanks

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    7,515
    Watching to see....have the same thoughts as you liont.
    Linda

  3. #3
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475
    I read about using the raw edge applique method. But I'm waiting to see if there are other more "non-intrusive" methods.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    698
    I sent you a PM.

  5. #5
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,487
    I've seen them done (edges turned under) with big stitch hand work...looked really nice, but probably as much work as regular needle turn applique. I've also seen them done with a satin zigzag machine stitch which also looks nice. Have not tried either method myself.
    legendarycandles.com
    Just discovered I qualify for FABLE (Fabric Acquired Beyond Life Expectancy)

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    11
    Have you tried the book "Dresden Plate Quilt - a simplified method by Wendy Gilbert". Its a Quilt in a Day publication. You sew a backing onto the plate & turn it inside out then just applique around the block. I have been very happy with the ones I have made. Here is a picture of one:Name:  100_0587.JPG
Views: 3523
Size:  1.31 MB

  7. #7
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475
    Quote Originally Posted by Chester View Post
    Have you tried the book "Dresden Plate Quilt - a simplified method by Wendy Gilbert". Its a Quilt in a Day publication. You sew a backing onto the plate & turn it inside out then just applique around the block. I have been very happy with the ones I have made. Here is a picture of one:
    I think I know what you mean. Let me experiment a bit. Thks!

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kansas City Mo
    Posts
    1,601
    Blog Entries
    1
    thanks for the idea Chester I have a few plates done just waiting to be sewed now but hands dont allow me to hand sew dumb me I was sure I could just sew them down with the sewing machine

  9. #9
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475
    Thks Chester. I just did a small experiment with a sample Dresden plate. I sewed the plate wrong side up onto a poplin. I trimmed away the excess around the plate, and flip it back inside out. Then I snipped, poked and pressed the petals. Then I trimmed away the excess poplin in the center. Did I do right?
    If what I've done is correct, this method is fairly straightforward. The only flip side I see is the extra bulk at the edge of the petals, where the poplin is.

  10. #10
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,851
    Quote Originally Posted by zipit View Post
    I sent you a PM.
    I'm interested too ... perhaps you could share your ides with the rest of us?



    Here's a tutorial that might be of interest to you. (The earlier steps wouldn't be so applicable for Dresden Plates)
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/tutoria...e-t188532.html
    I have a Dresden Plate of my Mom's that was done using this technique. All the blanket stitching is done with black floss.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  11. #11
    Super Member janedee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    canterbury uk
    Posts
    1,030
    I have done it like that but I didn't trim away the centre that way there are no 'ridges' around the edge of the petals

  12. #12
    Super Member beatys9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,584
    I did something similar to the method Chester describes. I had a customer that purchased an octagon Dresden Table Topper from me. She wanted 4 matching placemats, but just the Dresden plate - not the extra fabric I normally applique it to. I made the same matching Dresdens, then used coordinating fabric cut to the full shape of the finished plate. Sewed them right sides together, then made a slit in the center of the backing fabric to turn it through. Pushed out the points. I used the Easy Dresden tool but just drew the points as a sewing guide instead of sewing & turning each point. Then appliqued the center circle onto the back to cover the slit. She loved them & it worked nicely for placemats.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chester View Post
    Have you tried the book "Dresden Plate Quilt - a simplified method by Wendy Gilbert". Its a Quilt in a Day publication. You sew a backing onto the plate & turn it inside out then just applique around the block. I have been very happy with the ones I have made. Here is a picture of one:Name:  100_0587.JPG
Views: 3523
Size:  1.31 MB
    Shannon

  13. #13
    Super Member sewNso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S C michigan
    Posts
    2,007
    Blog Entries
    1
    i have been fingering my completed dresdon plates, and trying to get up the nerve/ambition to finish them. maybe i'll give it a try with some of your suggestions. thanks for starting this thread.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    698
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    I'm interested too ... perhaps you could share your ides with the rest of us?
    I sent her a link to an episode on thequiltshow.com. It's not that I don't want to share with everyone but I don't think they'd allow me to send very many invitations to view a show.

  15. #15
    Junior Member homebody323's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Rock Island, IL
    Posts
    296
    Blog Entries
    5
    you might try a pellon interfaceing instead of the poplin. Be sure to use, cutaway not tear away and procede as you did with the poplin. I don't recommend raw edge applique to anyone except for very small wall hangings that don't get washed. A few washes and those raw edges do fray. On most machines there is an heirloom stitch that will give you something close to that hand stitch you mentioned.
    Sally Dolin
    Rock Island, IL

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Cleveland,Mississippi
    Posts
    49
    Go to Missouri Star Quilt Co. You Tube and they will show you how to do the Dresdan Plate in a very simple way.

  17. #17
    Senior Member jcrilley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NE OH
    Posts
    559
    Blog Entries
    3
    Try a light weight interfacing instead of the poplin. I have never done this but have seen it demonstrated.

  18. #18
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,103
    Blog Entries
    3
    There's a tool available from www.ezquilt.com called "Easy Dresden" for the pointed blades - not for rounded ones. You cut a vee shaped wedge, flat across the top, then sew that flat seam, turn it inside out and end up with a point that doesn't have raw edges. So much easier than turning under the edges to applique. I haven't tried it, but wonder if the same technique could be used to make rounded blades.
    We are here to learn how to live in heaven - I'm still learning.

  19. #19
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Festus, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    1,552
    I prefer to use used dryer sheets to turn under the seam allowance on my applique. Same method as using a light weight non-woven interfacing. The wash-away embroidery stabilizers would also work but I'm too cheap to buy them--LOL.
    Beverly

  20. #20
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Holmen, WI
    Posts
    7,330
    Isn't there a method where you use a smaller template & then use starch somehow to turn the edge over it? It seems like I saw that someplace. I love rounded Dresden Plates. While she was still alive, my Mother used to hand baste the edges for me. Some of my happiest memories are of sitting on her sofa, watching old B & W movies & working on Dresden Plates.
    (`v)
    `*..*
    .
    .*).*)
    (.(. (..`..♥ rebecca

  21. #21
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475
    Thanks Zipit for the episode.
    I'll try to describe the relevant parts here.

    First part was the master demonstrating how to do hearts. She used freezer paper, cut to shape, placed at the rounded edge (1/4 inch away from edge). Then she applied glue on the edge. She folded/pressed/nudged into shape.

    Second part was doing modern Dresden. What the master did was to divide every plate into quadrants, each quadrant has 20/4=5 wedges. She does the pointy edge type using the sew across and fold down method. Then she placed the center wedge in the diagonal of the background fabric. Then another wedge and sewed like we do in foundation piecing, and so on ... until you complete the whole quadrant. What is interesting in this method is that you are free to use that quadrant (90 degree turn) in what every way you like, twisting and turning at will.
    I know I am not very clear, I am not too well versed in quilting lingo!

    Quote Originally Posted by jcrilley View Post
    Try a light weight interfacing instead of the poplin. I have never done this but have seen it demonstrated.
    Yes, you have a point there. Thanks for the tip

  22. #22
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cadillac, MI
    Posts
    6,582
    Blog Entries
    19
    You'll cut down on the bulk and the points in your curve if you use something lighter than poplin for the facing. The quilt book from the library used interfacing, but I haven't tried it. I'd prefer a lightweight cotton.

  23. #23
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rosedale, Indiana
    Posts
    2,003
    The method that Eleanor Burns uses is with fusible lightweight interfacing. You attach that to the back of your plate and then iron it to your background fabric and then stitch around it either by hand or machine. Very quick way of doing it and looks really good.

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    121
    Maybe this will help. Eleanor Burns did a show on Dresden plate, Here is the the infohttp://www.quiltinaday.com/
    Look for quilting videos then choose the Egg Money quilts. then find the video called Dresden Plate quilts. Good luck


    Caroline

  25. #25
    Senior Member cpfrog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    453
    Quote Originally Posted by liont View Post
    Thks Chester. I just did a small experiment with a sample Dresden plate. I sewed the plate wrong side up onto a poplin. I trimmed away the excess around the plate, and flip it back inside out. Then I snipped, poked and pressed the petals. Then I trimmed away the excess poplin in the center. Did I do right?
    If what I've done is correct, this method is fairly straightforward. The only flip side I see is the extra bulk at the edge of the petals, where the poplin is.
    Do NOT use poplin... it's too thick. (I realize this was an experiment).

    Just use a lightweight interfacing sewn right sides together; carefully cut a slit on interfacing side and turn inside out. lightly iron and the interfacing should shrink up just a little so it won't show on the outside edges and then hand applique as usual - but with ease!!!!!!!! no needle turns, etc. This should not be bulky.

    Good luck.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.