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Thread: Elmer's Glue Messy Story

  1. #1
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    Elmer's Glue Messy Story

    When I was a kid, I was never a neat person when it came to arts and crafts. I got more glue on me and my fingers, and never could get my project finished without stickies all over my projects. I haven't changed much. I just tried to use Elmer's glue (my first time on a quilt) to glue back the cut edges on a quilting label. Well, couldn't get the glue to stick the cotton to the pellon, used more glue. Pressed with fingers, fingers stuck to the fabric, fabric didn't stick to the pellon. Placed a clear piece of acrylic to weigh down the label, label stuck to acrylic, fabric did not stick to the pellon.

    What am I doing wrong?
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  2. #2
    Super Member TerryQuilter's Avatar
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    Are you pressing with the iron after you glue the cotton to the pellon? The heat from the iron dries the glue and it sticks unless you pull it apart. You don't need to use a lot of glue, a very thin line works fine. Some people use small dots of glue and that works also. I use Elmer's all the time and never have any problem with it not sticking.
    The Trike Riding Quilting Diva

  3. #3
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    It also helps to allow time for the glue to dry (if you are using the iron) before working on the project. If you are hand sewing the binding to the back for a quilt, place the glue where the needle would not be use. It can be quite a bear to hand sew through dried glue. However, it is not difficult to sew by machine through the glue.

  4. #4
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I don't think it's your fault. I did a wall-hanging with Pellon and the glue didn't stick at
    all.

  5. #5
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    I just used the glue for the first time to make pillow cases. I used the glue to keep the part folded in so I could sew it down by machine instead of by hand. It worked like a charm - very thin line, then ironed the fabric to dry it - it wasn't totally dry, and if I had pulled on it, it would have come apart. It held just enough so I could sew a straight line and no pins to poke me or break in the machine. It was funny because I was making 4 pillow cases, and the first one I pinned and it was a royal pain so thought, this is it - this is the time to try the glue and it worked like a charm! I was so excited I was telling everyone that would listen. No idea how it would hold to pellon - but it was totally wonderful on cotton. The clue is ironing it to dry it.

  6. #6
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    That would be my luck in using glue!

  7. #7
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    I've used Elmers glue for sandwiching with great success. Maybe it is the Pellon that is making the difference. I am in the same category with glueing, I washed my hand at least ten times during the process and still was sticking to everything in sight.

  8. #8
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    I immediately saw Tim Conrad in my mind doing a similar "trick" on an old Carol Burnett Show!! I'll bet his was much funnier than yours felt to you.

    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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  9. #9
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    I use glue sticks all of the time and I've had no problem but the sticks can be expensive. I read the other day where some of you buy the glue in the larger containers--if you do that, do you brush it on? I have been thinking about trying a brush as I have the mess sometimes even with the stick.

  10. #10
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathyjg View Post
    I use glue sticks all of the time and I've had no problem but the sticks can be expensive. I read the other day where some of you buy the glue in the larger containers--if you do that, do you brush it on? I have been thinking about trying a brush as I have the mess sometimes even with the stick.
    I just finished basting a quilt with Elmer's. I used it straight out of the bottle, letting each side dry overnight. It worked great, but I think next time I will use a little brush to smooth out some of the "lumps". It doesn't take a lot of glue and I was thrilled with the result - bye, bye pins! There was a discussion going on earlier this week about chevron quilts so I posted mine and didn't think to mention about the glue basting. Here's the quilt - it is the second one with the tall blue flowers in front. http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...s-t222207.html
    The glue washed right out and you would never know I did it that way.
    Pat

  11. #11
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
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    Oh, and I also forgot to mention where I found the instructions for glue basting. I think someone had posted this earlier on the QB and I finally decided to try it. Here's the link:
    http://californiaquilting.blogspot.c...l-glue-to.html
    Pat

  12. #12
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    Don't feel bad! I can make a mess cleaning house! I have found less is better when it comes to using any type of glue. It just oozes out and that's when one gets it all over themselves and everything else but what it is suppose to adhere to.

  13. #13
    Super Member OKLAHOMA PEACH's Avatar
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    This time of the year glue seems to be cheaper, bought 3 stiks for a dollar at the dollar store. Less is best on the liquid, i would suppose that the glue would need time to soak into the pellon.

  14. #14
    Super Member PenniF's Avatar
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    I cut up cereal boxes into about 2 x 2 squares and use them to gently smooth over my glue lines to eliminate "lumps and bumps"....spreads the glue and seems to help shorten dry time too.....then just toss the cardboard pieces in the trash.
    Of all the things i've lost, i miss my mind the most.

  15. #15
    Super Member onaemtnest's Avatar
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    I keep a wet terry cloth next to where I'm using Elmer's and wipe my fingers of glue frequently during the process. I read on here that "A dot is a lot" and after over gluing my first binding I learned that too much glue makes it nearly impossible to hand bind :0)

    Now I bought a gallon of Elmer's through Sam's club (with shipping under $15.00 (
    WARNING: I thought Wal Mart had it less expensive but noticed Wal Mart's gallon wasn't washable
    )

    I sandwiched my quilt I watered down my glue and drizzled back and forth on the batting.... in Picasso styled frenzied strings.... then spread those lines/stings into a thin layer with a 3" wide paint brush...WOWZER'S what a great tip learned from this board...no bumps ~ no lumps. (Wonder if the miracle brush would work on my thighs and bum ridding them of lumps and bumps???? I digress) I then ironed the sandwich dry and then repeated for the backing fabric.

    Another tip if your iron starts to drag because of glue seeping through the fabric just keep a
    (used) dryer sheet next to the iron and run that sticky iron plate back and forth over the dryer sheet VOILA slick as new.

    I use a glue stick on pellon to fold my quilt label fabric and haven't seemed to have any difficulties...again I press to dry...remembering not to use too much as you'll have a dickens of a time hand sewing through thick glue...I will use an artist's brush from now on since I have the the full gallon of glue to use up.
    Last edited by onaemtnest; 05-29-2013 at 07:21 AM.
    Smiles from Idaho,
    Onalee

    "What if you woke up today with only the things you had thanked God for yesterday?" ~ Michael Hyatt

  16. #16
    Super Member BuzzinBumble's Avatar
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    Oh poor you! It would be humorous if it wasn't so frustrating for you. I bet it was the Pellon though.
    I'm an arts and crafts klutz when it comes to sharp or hot things. My art teacher in high school had a permanent pass written out for me to go to the nurse's office.
    Jan I LOVE Tim Conway!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PenniF View Post
    I cut up cereal boxes into about 2 x 2 squares and use them to gently smooth over my glue lines to eliminate "lumps and bumps"....spreads the glue and seems to help shorten dry time too.....then just toss the cardboard pieces in the trash.
    Great idea! Love being able to repurpose what I'd normally throw away.

  18. #18
    Senior Member newbiequilter's Avatar
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    You are using Elmer's School Glue?

  19. #19
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    Buying Elmer's glue in large quantities

    Quote Originally Posted by kathyjg View Post
    I use glue sticks all of the time and I've had no problem but the sticks can be expensive. I read the other day where some of you buy the glue in the larger containers--if you do that, do you brush it on? I have been thinking about trying a brush as I have the mess sometimes even with the stick.
    I have done this but my trick is to keep an old glue bottle to keep refilling. Just keep one of your favorite size, mark it if it's a different product than on the label, and refill as needed. I like an 8 oz bottle best. Bought a 1/2 gallon of Elmers School Glue a few years ago and that bottle lasted forever.....until I needed it at work (I'm a teacher) and the kids finished it for me.
    Mistakes are just opportunities to invent a new quilting technique!

  20. #20
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    I've used Elmer's Washable School glue for matching then sewing seams while piecing and love it! I've used it to hold binding and love it! I just used it to sandwich part of a quilt (when I ran out of spray baste) and didn't love it so much. It takes awhile to dry (quilt is too big to iron sandwich dry) and it makes hard globs in places. Also, squeezing that bottle to get a fine stream is hard work, as crazy as that sounds. If I could find a way to spray or paint it on, I might like using it more.

    On the other hand, the spray baste also drives me crazy because I get overspray on the excess batting and backing (2 to 3 inches beyond the top) and on the table, floor, etc. I can wash the table and mop the floor but I hate the stickiness of the spray on the batting and backing while I'm quilting. I'm now using a piece of fabric or newspaper to block the spray but that's a nuisance, too. I think I may just not like the sandwiching part. But then who does?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by onaemtnest View Post
    I keep a wet terry cloth next to where I'm using Elmer's and wipe my fingers of glue frequently during the process. I read on here that "A dot is a lot" and after over gluing my first binding I learned that too much glue makes it nearly impossible to hand bind :0)

    Now I bought a gallon of Elmer's through Sam's club (with shipping under $15.00 (
    WARNING: I thought Wal Mart had it less expensive but noticed Wal Mart's gallon wasn't washable
    )

    I sandwiched my quilt I watered down my glue and drizzled back and forth on the batting.... in Picasso styled frenzied strings.... then spread those lines/stings into a thin layer with a 3" wide paint brush...WOWZER'S what a great tip learned from this board...no bumps ~ no lumps. (Wonder if the miracle brush would work on my thighs and bum ridding them of lumps and bumps???? I digress) I then ironed the sandwich dry and then repeated for the backing fabric.

    Another tip if your iron starts to drag because of glue seeping through the fabric just keep a
    (used) dryer sheet next to the iron and run that sticky iron plate back and forth over the dryer sheet VOILA slick as new.

    I use a glue stick on pellon to fold my quilt label fabric and haven't seemed to have any difficulties...again I press to dry...remembering not to use too much as you'll have a dickens of a time hand sewing through thick glue...I will use an artist's brush from now on since I have the the full gallon of glue to use up.
    Great idea! If I'd read these posts first, I probably wouldn't have posted myself. I'm not a patient person about some things--but incredibly dogged about others--but spreading the glue in this fashion or with a piece of cardboard, as someone else mentioned, sounds like the way to go. Thanks for these tips!

  22. #22
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I would NOT recommend "painting" the glue all over. It makes the sandwich very stiff
    and difficult to maneuver through the machine. It's like holding a large piece of cardboard.
    I prefer to apply the glue in waves and smear the glue into the batting then use the
    iron to dry.

  23. #23
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    I haven't been successful with elmer's glue with my quilting, but that's just me.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  24. #24
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    What is pellon

  25. #25
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    Cheer up, I too am challenged with small-motor skills. At least it wasn't epoxy! That is how preservation cvrpentry is done and it is worse than Superglue. At least Elmers washes out. The guys who do the epoxies say when the going gets sticky keep your hands off...

    I suggest you use a needle and thread.

    My rule is do no harm, and you can't beat a needle and thread for removing mistakes.
    SueSew
    "If it's messy, eat it over the sink!" Mom

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