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Thread: Enough quilting to hold it together -

  1. #1
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    Enough quilting to hold it together -

    Some of the quilting I see on here is awesome! The designs, the accuracy/ intricacy, the density - the quilting is beautiful and does add a lot to the quilts.

    So far, my machine quilting consists of stitch in the ditch - which I do well - and straight line stitching on a domestic seeing machine. ( Are there any "wild" sewing machines out there?)

    Anyway, I have decided that my "minimalist" quilting will be adequate

    And I am telling myself that I want to let the wonderfulness of my piecing be the star of the quilt.

    Sounds good to me !
    Last edited by bearisgray; 05-07-2019 at 04:17 AM.

  2. #2
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    I agree 100%. I think there is quilting for show and quilting for comfort. Light quilting makes a snuggly quilt. Although I do think there is a transition in a quilter. In one stage a quilter focuses on color, 1/4 inch seams and patterns. Then there is another phase, where a quilter focuses on the quilting. I always migrate to color and pattern.

  3. #3
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    I have to agree with you both. Yes, I'm in awe of the intricate micro-quilting and the perfect feathers, etc. seen at the national quilt shows. I truly appreciate the 400 frazillion hours it took to come up with the perfect design and execute it with no mistakes. But I have to work and clean the house and cook and all that other life stuff and I only have a few hours each week to piece or quilt. So I have to decide what is important to me. I want a pretty quilt that is comfortable to sleep under, and I would like to get a few finished each year. I decided a couple of years ago that the fabric, colors, and pattern were what I love the most. I have a sit-down Tiara machine and am able to get some "good enough" quilting done on the ones I finish, and that is fine with me! The few people I have given quilts to are like me - they pay attention to the color and pattern and not the actual quilting, so it works all around.

  4. #4
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    Check out Pinterest or any other quilt blogs for "Walking Foot Quilting." You can do a lot of great quilt patterns with it.

  5. #5
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    As long as the quilting meets the batting requirements, then it is fine. I love my quilting rulers and ruler foot but I use them on open spaces. The quilting should highlight the piecing not up stage it in my opinion.

  6. #6
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    I really dislike massive quilting on a quilt. I prefer to see the layout of the pieces which is often hidden by the quilting. I think some quilts are so overly quilted that they could stand up on their own. Just my opinion.

  7. #7
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    I tend to like fluffier batts and less quilting than is currently popular, but a lot of that is because that is what I am able to do myself. Some times though warm & natural and dense intricate quilting is what I want.

    I have to admit that my mind is having a hard time to wrap itself around the 3-D part of the quilt process. I do 2-D just fine. Plus I really can't draw at all which doesn't help. I've seen the difference a talented quilter can make in a lack-luster top but there's that key word "talented".

    For the past couple of years I've had access to a friend's long arm but it looks like I will have to find other options. I've been composing a message for Craig's List to see if I can share a home set up with some one some how maybe a couple days a month for a year or so. I understand the cost of the systems and their maintenance and am willing to pay but can't afford the shop rates and scheduling time commitments as well as (of course) my batting, needles, thread, etc. Maybe I can trade house or pet-sitting for someone who travels or assist someone who isn't using their setup because of physical reasons. Looking for something mutually beneficial, of course finding a like-minded person who just loves to quilt and become my life-long devoted quilting partner would be ideal... but heck, I'll just pay for some time on a machine too.

    Same thing with paying someone to quilt, what I'm willing to pay for can be done, but it isn't what I want. But, if I can find a quilter who loves the quilting aspect who would be willing to quilt my donation projects that would be great. I can adjust my projects by their pet charity if need be, mostly I like to have projects to keep me busy.

    I know there are a lot of quilters in my area lucky enough to have home set-ups and then some of them find they don't enjoy it that much, or justified the cost by the idea of quilting for money and then found they didn't like that aspect of it but with total freedom to do what they want and their own schedule to do it, might be willing to accept some payment less than going rates.

  8. #8
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Yep, me too!
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  9. #9
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I like and usually do just FMQ or a large meander. I don't like all the heavy quilting for my quilts.

    I like looking at it.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  10. #10
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    My favorite part of quilting is the FMQ. That being said, while some dense quilting is done perfectly and is beautiful, I don't aspire to do that. I do practice with a ruler and try different things, and am getting better, but, for me, and this is just my opinion for my quilts, less is more.
    Alyce

  11. #11
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    I have seen some beautiful custom quilting done that enhances the piecing. I have also seen some that overwhelmed the piecing. But, that is not what I am capable of. So I do my best to pick colors and patterns that make a striking quilt and do some simple mostly straight stitch quilting. I have a sister that would do very artist quilting but she has no desire to use a sewing machine.

  12. #12
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    I will never be able to do more than basic SITD, echo, crosshatch, straight lines and some wavy lines. That's OK though. I do love and admire the incredible quilting that I see pictured here on the board. The talent and beauty produced is simply amazing.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lberna View Post
    I really dislike massive quilting on a quilt. I prefer to see the layout of the pieces which is often hidden by the quilting. I think some quilts are so overly quilted that they could stand up on their own. Just my opinion.
    I so agree with you.

  14. #14
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    I agree totally with you. IMHO, I think we should be able to see all the intricacies of the quilt--pattern, color, etc. Some quilts are so heavily quilted that I do not like them.

  15. #15
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    Bearisgray, thank you for coming up with this topic. I make mostly art quilts and want the design to stand out, so try to do minimal quilting that enhances the design. Even though I admire intricate and imaginative quilting, I know I will never get to that level because I'm not motivated enough to become good at it.

    And Tartan, I appreciate your reminder about enough stitching to meet the batting requirements. I'm struggling with that right now because I like my quilt, "Wind in my Garden" the way it is. I guess I could put washing instructions on the back: Don't!

  16. #16
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    I also like the minimalist approach to quilting. I do appreciate the fantastic work done by some quilters, but I prefer to simply have it be a small part of the project. I usually decide on how much by how the quilt will be used. Example, a child's quilt get a bit of extra stitching because I want it to be dragged everywhere and washed a whole lot - well, well used. A gift for a more mature person might have less stitching, but perhaps a little bit fancier patterns. Only thing that is pretty standard for me is that I never use invisible thread on a child's quilt. If it snags and pulls out, it will not break and it is too easy for them to get a tiny toe or finger caught in it. And, with a baby quilt, I very often do a self-binding because I know how easy it is for them to gnaw binding off. I do this binding at about 1 1/2" and use a decorative stitch so it really looks like a blanket binding.

  17. #17
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    I do believe that one "should" meet the suggestions of/on the batting for minimum spacing of the quilting.

    I saw some donation quilts that were well designed, nicely pieced - but tied at about 18 inch intervals (each way). That is a bit "too minimalist" for my taste.

    I currently do not have the skill set for the intricate quilting some can do - which I truly admire - nor am I motivated enough to either learn how to or acquire a long arm.

    So - there may be just a touch of "sour apples" in my comment -

    I do admit to feeling a bit self-defensive with my "plainer jane" quilting - but as long as a quilt gets finished and is usable - I consider it "a good thing" .

  18. #18
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    I admire the skill some people have for quilting but I like to see a some puffiness left in the quilt. So much quilting flattens the whole quilt into a rug. Nothing left to snuggle in.

  19. #19
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    My feelings exactly!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I do believe that one "should" meet the suggestions of/on the batting for minimum spacing of the quilting.

    I saw some donation quilts that were well designed, nicely pieced - but tied at about 18 inch intervals (each way). That is a bit "too minimalist" for my taste.

    I currently do not have the skill set for the intricate quilting some can do - which I truly admire - nor am I motivated enough to either learn how to or acquire a long arm.

    So - there may be just a touch of "sour apples" in my comment -

    I do admit to feeling a bit self-defensive with my "plainer jane" quilting - but as long as a quilt gets finished and is usable - I consider it "a good thing" .
    Bearisgray, I have followed your comments for several years. I, like you, think the amount of quilting depends on the preferences and ability of the quiltmaker. That being said, while I greatly admire the quilts by HCarpinni, I know that I do not possess that innate ability to design and execute such artistic quilting, and I am not motivated to spend a lot of time and still not be successful. I think all of us need to focus on what we reasonably can do and enjoy. My quilting is my "me" time. If I choose to give or donate a quilt, I hope the recipient enjoys it, but I am not the Picasso of quilting, nor do I need or have to be. I am just me.

  21. #21
    Member christinelf's Avatar
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    I totally agree with you. I admire the beautiful quilting I see in other’s quilts, but I am not artistic, can’t draw a line without a ruler! I do QAYG on my home machine, using my walking foot to make simple geometric designs. I also copy images on my I pad that look doable, like in the “two baby quilts” shown above. I also use my built-in decorative stitches sometimes.

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