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Thread: finishing a quilt

  1. #1
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    finishing a quilt

    once you have finish piecing and quilting a quilt do you trim off the extra batting/backing prior to squaring up the quilt or do you square it up with the extra batting/backing still attached? and if someone can give examples or show me how its done that would help me so much. A fairly new quilter of 2 yrs and learning so much from this board. Thanks for all your help.

  2. #2
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    I trim my back and batt about 1/4 inch past the quilt edge. Depending on the size, I will use my table or the floor to spread out my quilt full size. I then use my large squares and rulers to square up the sandwich. I put a large square on the top corner making sure I will not be cutting off any fabric needed for a 1/4 inch seam when I attach the binding. I place my other large square at the bottom corner. I then line up my long clear rulers to connect the 2 squares. If everything looks good, I draw a cutting line with my Frixion or chalk pen. I do all 4 sides this way and then bring my quilt to my cutting table to rotary cut on the drawn lines.
    Everyone has their own method for squaring up their quilts, this is just how I do it.

  3. #3
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    Tartan, your method sounds great. I was trying to line up the rulers and cut it then shift the next few feet of quit on the cutting mat and cut that, etc.

  4. #4
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    I like the sound of Tartan's method too! Will have to give it a try next time.
    Thanks for sharing.
    GEMRM

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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    he, he. I tend to use my 24 inch ruler and move it along and cut. on my cutting table. sometimes I have marked but not often.
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
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  6. #6
    Super Member Cybrarian's Avatar
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    Any chances on some pics Tartan?

  7. #7
    Cyn
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    Super Member Cyn's Avatar
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    I sew the binding on and then trim everything just in case.

  8. #8
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    I square my quilts similar to Tartan. But I just do it on the cutting mat. I have a large mat so it makes it easy. I use a 12 1/2" square to do the corners and use my 4" x 36" ruler to connect the space between the corners. Hope this description helps.

  9. #9
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Again Tartan your way sounds wonderful!!!!!

  10. #10
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    I lay my quilts on the floor, place a cutting mat underneath, and square up each corner. Then I take my long ruler and meet the corners.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    he, he. I tend to use my 24 inch ruler and move it along and cut. on my cutting table. sometimes I have marked but not often.
    This is the way I do it most of the time. I'm afraid if I did the floor method, I would not be able to get back up again! LOL

    Last quilt I made, I used my serger all the way around. I have never made a quilt for a quilt show and once it was washed - nothing was exactly straight anyway.

    My advice, think about the type of quilt it is. If it will be entered in a quilt show then the more precise you are the better. If it's for a kid and will be washed and dragged around a lot - use the easiest method.

  12. #12
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    My method of squaring is similar to Tartan's, but I just use regular yardsticks between the corner square rulers. They're just for marking, not cutting, so they don't need to be acrylic. I mark the cutting line about " beyond the edge of the quilt top all the way around and do a preliminary trim on that line to square it and reduce the bulk for adding binding.

    Once the sandwich is square, I mark a line back in from the cut edge for the raw edge of my binding, making sure that line will put the stitching securely on the quilt top. That guarantees that the binding goes on squarely even if the edge of the pieced top is a bit off.

    Once the binding is sewn on the front, I take the binding width from seam to fold, divide that number by 2, and cut that distance from the binding seam to the edge of the sandwich. That guarantees that the binding is full no matter what it's width with no more than " seam taken on the pieced top itself (so no lost points with wide bindings).

    It sounds like extra work, but the results are well worth it for me no matter what the furure purpose of the quilt. I treat them all the same cuz they all deserve the best I can do.
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