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Thread: FMQ comming along, but......

  1. #1
    Junior Member bri1977's Avatar
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    My stitches are always so close together. It just looks so tight and not relaxed. It doesn't matter what stitch length or speed I use. I also do not have a quilting machine. I have a Kenmore mini ultra so I don't have a lot of settings to work with. I have got good tension going, but Stitches are right on top of each other. Advise me please and thank you :-) :-) :-)

  2. #2
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    I think it's a matter of practice. Mine have improved much, but are still small when I first start off.

  3. #3
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    If you've changed stitch length and machine speed I'm guessing your hand speed is too slow.

    I personally am not comfortable enough yet for a fast hand/machine speed. I try to match my machine speed to my hand speed - eventually found my "comfort zone".

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Sounds like you are moving your fabric to slowly. Are you wearing gloves? They really help a lot with fabric control.

  5. #5
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Do you already have your machine set to slow, or are you able to keep it running slow and steady with the foot control? That takes a lot of practice and I'm still not great with it.

    If you go to Harbor Freight (or Lowe's or whatever) you can buy a router speed control for about $20.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/router-...rol-43060.html

    Plug the machine into the speed control, plug the speed control into the outlet and set the switch to "Var." (variable) Turn the dial to the high end of slow and with your machine un-threaded, push the foot control all the way to the floor.

    Turn the dial up or down until the machine is running as fast as you want it to run. Thread it up and put a practice piece in there and see if that works well. If the stitches are still piling up, turn down the speed control. If they're too big and you feel like you're crawling along, turn it up faster.

    Find a comfortable speed for you - you won't feel out of control and you won't feel like you are getting bored waiting for the machine to catch up with you, either. :)

  6. #6
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot
    Do you already have your machine set to slow, or are you able to keep it running slow and steady with the foot control? That takes a lot of practice and I'm still not great with it.

    If you go to Harbor Freight (or Lowe's or whatever) you can buy a router speed control for about $20.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/router-...rol-43060.html

    Plug the machine into the speed control, plug the speed control into the outlet and set the switch to "Var." (variable) Turn the dial to the high end of slow and with your machine un-threaded, push the foot control all the way to the floor.

    Turn the dial up or down until the machine is running as fast as you want it to run. Thread it up and put a practice piece in there and see if that works well. If the stitches are still piling up, turn down the speed control. If they're too big and you feel like you're crawling along, turn it up faster.

    Find a comfortable speed for you - you won't feel out of control and you won't feel like you are getting bored waiting for the machine to catch up with you, either. :)
    I have never heard of this!!! will it work on any sewing machine? Thanks for the info.

    Also, re: FMQ, it takes a lot of practice to know when your sewing machine and hands are moving at the right speed, but when that happens you will know it, and, after a lot of practice, can duplicate! I'm still working on consistency.

  7. #7
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper
    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot
    If you go to Harbor Freight (or Lowe's or whatever) you can buy a router speed control for about $20.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/router-...rol-43060.html

    I have never heard of this!!! will it work on any sewing machine?
    It doesn't work on my treadles. :mrgreen:

    Just kiddin'. ;)

    Yes, it works on any machine. All it does is control the amount of juice going to the machine.

    And you're absolutely right about practicing. Nothing else substitutes for that. (Dagnabbit!)

  8. #8
    Junior Member bri1977's Avatar
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    Thank You everyone. I am not wearing gloves but considered those "rubber fingers" for counting money. I've also heard using turtle wax on the machine helps????? And I may def. try the router. Thanks for the detailed instructions :)

  9. #9
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    FMQ takes practice. Geesh, don't spend money where it is not necessary. Make yourself or your mom a pot holder. You should get the hang of it quickly. By all means, get some gloves, but buy gardening gloves at the Dollar store. Don't spend money on the "Money suckers" or what ever they are called. Cut off the thumb and fore-finger. This is brillance. Router, you say yes to; I say pfft. Totally unnecessary. Take a 20.00 bill and flush it down the toilet.

  10. #10
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Hmm. I'm not an electrician, but I would hesitate to using router (rheostat) on a sewing machine, especially if it's a computerized one, or one that I actually cared about. It's like when you have a brown out from the power company. They tell you to unplug everything. Any machine repair folks out there who can give a difinitive answer?

  11. #11
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonnieLoree
    Router, you say yes to; I say pfft. Totally unnecessary. Take a 20.00 bill and flush it down the toilet.
    You know, there is no need to be rude and dismissive when you're speaking about a suggestion that was made in the attempt to be helpful to the person who asked the question.

    $20 is too much money for you to spend? Okay, that's fine, don't do it. But why make disparaging remarks about it as though it's a stupid idea.

    For me, $20 was a small price to pay for something that turned out to be very helpful. In other words, it was wayyyyy worth it to me. Worked like a charm while I got the hang of controlling a machine that had two speeds - "jackrabbit" and "stop."

  12. #12
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    I'm not an electrician, but I would hesitate to using router (rheostat) on a sewing machine, especially if it's a computerized one,
    I have no idea if this would be a problem - maybe there will be an electrician or someone who can answer this definitively.

    Until then, maybe you're right and people shouldn't use this on a computerized machine. Thanks for the input.

    I've used the router control primarily on model 15's - one with a vintage and one with a modern repro motors. I also used it with two vintage Kenmores. I first heard about it several years ago on a vintage machine list and I've never heard of anyone ever having any problem with it at all.

  13. #13
    Junior Member bri1977's Avatar
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    [/quote]For me, $20 was a small price to pay for something that turned out to be very helpful. In other words, it was wayyyyy worth it to me. Worked like a charm while I got the hang of controlling a machine that had two speeds - "jackrabbit" and "stop."[/quote]

    This is my thinking also. My machine is not computerized and is a Charlie Sheen Ltd. Edition Kenmore with one gear, "GO" (sorry, had to) . It would take muscles non existent in the human foot to make it do anything else. I am also a mother of 3 planning on going back to school soon and time is limited, so I need to make each practice session really count. I have a Queen Sized T shirt Quilt I made just waiting to be quilted so anything that will help me get this down is worth it. I also have the potential to be paid for making my friend's parents one so it would pretty much pay for itself. :) Thanks again to everyone for the advise.

  14. #14
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    I found your informaiton helpful as I had went to Freight Harbor and bought one a few weeks ago, wasn't quite sure how to operate it til now! Thanks, not sure if I will like it, but if it helps with FM I am all about it. Mine cost $16.00 and you can use a 20% coupon and also get a free flashlight while your at it! I think that is quite a bargain! I use mine on an old singer.

    Also, you can pick up some gloves for fm there for a buck! Love Freight Harbor! :-D

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