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Thread: FMQ on a Viking machine

  1. #1
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    Unhappy FMQ on a Viking machine

    My DH bought me the walking and darning feet for my Scandinavian 300 machine by Viking. I'm doing well with the walking foot, but do not like the darning foot. It lifts from the fabric every stitch, and the sales rep at the Joanne's says that is how it is supposed to work. I don't seem to be able to get consistent length stitches when I'm trying to do FMQ. Any tips or suggestions for me? I really need help! Thanks so much.
    Patty RG
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    www.PatchworkAndPockets.etsy.com

  2. #2
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    With the darning foot, you control the stitch length by how fast you move the fabric, it takes lots of practice to move the fabric so that your stitches are nice and even. Keep practicing
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  3. #3
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
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    that is how it works.there is no stitch regulator-you are it.they say sew fast move slow to get nice stitches.I could not master it that way and we have a long arm now-with stitch regulator. quilting takes lots of practice on any method you choose.by the way feed dogs should be down when free motion on your domestic machine.hope this helps
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  4. #4
    Super Member CorgiNole's Avatar
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    Yep - it is unsettling at first, but that really is the way it works. FMQ takes lots of practice to develop a comfortable rhythm for the stitching.

    Cheers, K

  5. #5
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    it just takes practice---and patience---if you make up a stack of (practice) sandwiches- and just every once in a while when you have some time-sit down and quilt them--after some time you will get the hang of it-
    but it takes time-and lots of practice.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  6. #6
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
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    I have the Viking Sapphire 855 and have been practicing for a year.....still cannot get my stitches regulated but it isn't the machine....it is me. If I get a good "rythmn" going then I can do pretty good if I do not get interrupted.

  7. #7
    Senior Member donac's Avatar
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    It is a lot of practice. I just finished a baby quilt and I was happy with the consistency of the stitches but I have been working at it for a while. Keep at it. It will come.

  8. #8
    Super Member Mad Mimm's Avatar
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    I have a Viking Emerald 118 and use it for FMQ. With enough practice, I am able to keep my stitches fairly regular. I even tried FMQ using a darning foot and leaving the feed dogs UP (read that somewhere on the 'net and decided to try it). The movement of the fabric was obviously not as easy with the dogs up, but I had an easier time getting even stitches and was still able to draw circles and pebbles, etc. I was using a small practice sandwich at the time and switched back to dogs down because I realized that if I am doing a larger blanket, the extra drag created by the dogs might be problematic. I figured it was a shortcut that will not pay off in the end and it was better to learn to do it the harder way and get my timing down.

    Do you listen to music while you FMQ? I find that VERY helpful. Good luck!
    Sheila N.

    When Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, he tried over 2000 experiments before he got it to work. A young reporter asked him how it felt to fail so many times. He said, "I never failed once. I invented the light bulb. It just happened to be a 2000 step process."

  9. #9
    Senior Member Sally J's Avatar
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    I have a Viking 500 that I use the "hopping" foot with. It took some practice, yes sewing faster is better. I finally figured out that I use it like the beat of music and it actually helped me make the stitches more even. Try thinking that way. On my Viking D1 you don't use that foot, just darning foot with no movement. I actually have more trouble with that as I haven't practice so much but also miss the "music hopping beat" Just keep practicing. Feed dogs do need to be down.

  10. #10
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    I have a quilt designer and I love it for fmq can you slow your machine speed down a notch that works for me. And believe me it does take practice and patience. If you choose a light thread like 60 and that blends into the fabric you will get better results than once you get the rhythm you can go to different threads .

  11. #11
    Senior Member SherryW's Avatar
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    Yes, that's the way it works. I am not good at FMQing, I guess I haven't had enough practice. I tried to FMQ some feathers the other day and they were hideous. It was kind of a sample, and I was going to use it as a table topper, but I'm not happy with it at all. Everything came out good except the FMQing!

  12. #12
    Member elaine80's Avatar
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    I just got a Viking Sapphire a couple months ago with a quilting foot. At first it was awful....just couldn't get things coordinated. Gradually I found some things that helped. I use a "supreme slider" under the needle and leave the feed dogs up. Then I set the stitch to 0.0. One thing that seems absolutely necessary is to pull up the bobbin thread each time you start or it gets messed up underneath. I found that I can do a much better job of controlling my stitches if I don't go too fast. My machine has 3 sewing speeds and I set it at the lowest speed. Most of the time I can control the length of my stitches that way and it's beginning to look pretty good. I've quilted 4 quilts in the past 2 months and they are looking better all the time. I even did feather quilting on the last one ...not perfect ...but more than passable. Keep trying, with practice you can do it.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Everyone esle is right, its working as it should. Close up of the stitches don't always look good but, look better at a distance and after it is washed and dried. Just keep going and you will be happier with it.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  14. #14
    Junior Member fishhavengirl's Avatar
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    You might want to try the "Big Foot" instead of the darning foot. It's bigger and flat made with clear plastic. I had trouble with the darning foot catching in the stitches. The big foot eliminates that and it's smooth sailing. Do you use the silicone sliding sheet underneath your fabric? That really helps with moving the fabric smoothly. Slow as you sew and listen to music it helps get you in sync to free motion.

  15. #15
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    All of these post are right. Go to this site and she does alot with doing FMQ on domestic machines. She'll show you things to do that should help. I don't have a lot of experience with FMQ but wearing gloves either the ones for FMQ or gardening gloves with the ruber grips really does help move the fabric more easily. You'll have to makes sure you have the machine speed down low and go slow. Good luck.
    http://www.daystyledesigns.com/quiltshop.htm
    Judy

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