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Thread: formaldehyde in fabric?

  1. #26
    Super Member A1penny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    Yes almost all do ... thats one more reason to prewash.

    http://www.800mainstreet.com/formaldehyde/Fabrics.html

    http://www.dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/...e-allergy.html
    do scroll down the page .. they recommend several washings.
    Thanks Lori S. for the info! I didn't know this, and yngldy........that was a great question! I'm often asked why I wash all the fabric I buy........and I just say, "that was what my first teacher told me to do".........NOW I'll have a better answer.
    Last edited by A1penny; 06-08-2012 at 05:27 AM. Reason: spelling

  2. #27
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
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    There is a place here in Colorado that one can go to get material , its been around for 35 years and they are wonderful people- We pick up freight from them quite often. Here is their website: http://www.envirotextile.com/
    I have not used their fabric yet -keyword-yet- Have to have the time to get up there when they are open (as I am a feely type person when it comes to material). I was talking to the owner's daughter and she was saying some of their materials start at $4.00 and up to $20.00. It might be worth a try, yah you would have to pay for shipping and handling-but its supposed to be an all natural fabrics.
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  3. #28
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TanyaL View Post
    My SIL who is a Hazardous Waste Fire Chief tells me that if someone ever succeeded in getting a totally air tight house so that they could save on their HVAC cost, it would kill them because of the fumes from the chemicals in their carpets, drapes, walls and building materials. The drafts in our houses save our lives. Hard to get excited over our quilting fabrics when we have lethal carpets, etc. around.
    However, if our quilt fabric adds just enough chemical to throw the chemicals in house components into the danger zone, we'd better be "excited".
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  4. #29
    Super Member ladyredhawk's Avatar
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    wow I didn't know that. Fingernail polish has it. It makes your nails harder.
    Ladyredhawk

  5. #30
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    Isn't it great what you learn on here. I didn't always wash my fabric unless I thought it might bleed. But you have me a believer to wash always. I have also just put it through a rinse & not a wash so I will be changing that also. Thank you so much for the information.

  6. #31
    Super Member urgodschild2's Avatar
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    This has been a great discussion. Whether or not formaldyhyde is found in Aspertaine or not is irrelevant....they all have chemicals. I knew about the stuff in the material and have washed my material because I just don't like the idea of the chemicals. But I wonder when they make our material with all the beautiful prints.......what kind of chemicals go into the printing process? And why is it that some of the material with lots of prints all over it are stiffer then others????? I do like to feel my material if I can. Thanks for all the information about how dangerous our homes can be with all the chemicals in it. Glad I have the windows opened. LOL.
    Dreaming of New England while being stuck in So. Calif.(the asphalt jungle of the world.) But hey the Happiest Place on Earth is here.

  7. #32
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    Yes, most fabrics still contain formaldehyde. Also, many contain a chemical to "set" the dyes used.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  8. #33
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    A interesting side note: When I moved to NC from Indiana, we moved into a brand new house. I was in and out of the crawl space due to a variety of issues. For the last two years we lived there, I had unbearable hives. The doctors could not figure out what they were caused by. I moved back to Indiana and have not had a breakout of hives since. It was almost immediate. I really believe it was the chemicals in the house and crawl space that brought on the allergies.

  9. #34
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    I am sensitive to chemicals, one being formaldehyde. I can not stay in Jo Ann's for more than 20 mins. The fumes from formaldehyde makes my eyes burn....I stick to all cotton. I haven't had any problems with the cotton....

  10. #35
    Super Member Jackie R's Avatar
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    That's why I only drink water or plain iced tea. And of course, a bit of wine at dinner!

  11. #36
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I don't think a lot of people know how much formaldehyde is in everything around us. It is in the print in books, the money we handle, etc.

    http://www.formaldehydefacts.org/app...s/common_uses/

  12. #37
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    I find that really interesting because about 10 years ago w moved into this house and I got extremely sick. I had never been sick much at all until moving here. I began to notice that as long as I was working outside most of the day, I wouldn't get so sick but in the evenings when I was inside it would hit me like a ton of bricks. I also had a lot of repairs that need to be done under the house (crawl space) and when I worked under there I was worse then ever. I got worried and called the poison control people and explained what was going on and asked if they had any idea what could be causing me so much trouble. They told me that their best guess would be from the materials the house was made from. This was a huge shock to me because I have always lived in wooden houses, the difference was the houses I previously lived in were all old houses (most built in early 1900's) so even though I grow up in wood houses the ones they make today are not all wood like they use to be made. They told me that the smell of formaldehyde should only linger about 6 months but since the house was already 10 years old they had no idea what to tell me to do.

    To make a long story short, I ripped out every bit of flooring in the house, carpet, wood, tile, you name it I ripped it out, in the process of doing so the fumes were so bad they knocked me flat on my butt. I had to be taken outside and I lived in the shed until all the work was done. After I got some good air I opened the house up for several days so I could go in and do the work. It took a while because after 4 or 5 hours in the house I just got sick and had to get out. Anyway, I had to seal the floors with several coats of porch paint to seal out the fumes from the sub-flooring which is all press board, particle board or what ever you want to call it. Once the floors were sealed with the paint, I laid the heaviest tar paper I could get on top and then added all new hardwood not imitation but real hard wood floors or ceramic tiles. This is the only way I could fix the house for me to be able to live in it. All the kitchen cabinets that were made with the particle board also were removed.

    To this day, I refuse to buy anything made with particle board, all the nice looking shelves and things they make are what makes so many people sick. Yes all fabrics, carpet, the particle boards for house building, furniture and so much more have some form of chemicals in them but it seems they are putting more of the stuff in there then what is needed.

    Most people that know me say that I'm to picky because if something isn't make with plain old solid wood, then I don't want it even if your giving it away.

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetana3 View Post
    A interesting side note: When I moved to NC from Indiana, we moved into a brand new house. I was in and out of the crawl space due to a variety of issues. For the last two years we lived there, I had unbearable hives. The doctors could not figure out what they were caused by. I moved back to Indiana and have not had a breakout of hives since. It was almost immediate. I really believe it was the chemicals in the house and crawl space that brought on the allergies.
    Last edited by seasaw2mch; 06-08-2012 at 10:39 PM.

  13. #38
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Nothing gets to "live" at our place unless it can be washed....good old soap and water and hung outside to dry...gets rid of most "nasties" and is a much healthier way to live. It is difficult to be completely chemical free....but using natural products and regular sweeping, dusting and airing does help a lot.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    The formaldehyde is added for wrinkle resistance primarily, not insect control, though that is a side 'benefit' of it, as is the crisp feel that many give as the reason they do not pre-wash. Manufacturers work long and hard to create non-wrinkling fabrics so the odds of washing out the formaldehyde are really pretty slim...especially in clothing. Once it 'cures' and stops smelling, it's still there. More than you want to know about it can be found here.
    http://oecotextiles.wordpress.com/20...-your-fabrics/

    California has been posting warning signs for at least 4 years (probably way before that, but that's when it started showing up on quilting boards).
    Just read it. Woah. Gross and scary! It never comes out??? So what are we quilters supposed to do? Buy all organic?

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wattse2000 View Post
    Just read it. Woah. Gross and scary! It never comes out??? So what are we quilters supposed to do? Buy all organic?
    I suppose we shouldn't worry so much about what we sew on as much as what we wear.

  16. #41
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    Wonder what the chemicals do to the septic systems? Maybe better NOT to wash lots of fabric as it might poison the leach field. Does anyone know where to find an answer to this question? Thanks.
    Anita

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  17. #42
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Such an interesting topic.

    I am used to washing and drying my fabrics 3 times before cutting since I raised my kids. Didn't want my hard work to go to waste and shrink. But, now I have to wash it because the chemicals bother my finger tips immediately.

    Linda

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  18. #43
    Super Member May in Jersey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TanyaL View Post
    My SIL who is a Hazardous Waste Fire Chief tells me that if someone ever succeeded in getting a totally air tight house so that they could save on their HVAC cost, it would kill them because of the fumes from the chemicals in their carpets, drapes, walls and building materials. The drafts in our houses save our lives. Hard to get excited over our quilting fabrics when we have lethal carpets, etc. around.
    Guess this is why I have a problem with motel/hotel rooms if I stay in them more than one night, my nasal passages get dry and irritated. One time I left the room around 3 am and sat outside the motel until 7am so I could awake my roommate so we could check out. Just back from a 5 day stay in Las Vegas, being outdoors helped a lot but there is no moisture in the air in that desert. Windows wouldn't open a crack but had to stay as it was our granddaughter's wedding but oh so glad to be back in moist New Jersey. We often visit grandkids in Mass. and the motel we stay at has windows that open a few inches and I open them as soon as we get there. Letting some outside fresh air in helps.

    Sorry I got off tract here but I do wash before cutting to get rid of dyes, chemicals and if fabric is going to shrink it's better to take care of it before making the quilt. I'm a coordinator for my Guild's Project Pillowcases that distributes pillowcases to kids in local hospitals. After each pillowcase is made we wash and dry them before placing them into baggies that we seal, we don't want to cause the kids can further medical problems. May in Jersey
    Last edited by May in Jersey; 06-09-2012 at 08:46 AM.

  19. #44
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
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    I agree that I don't prewash before sewing, but I do always wash before giving them or using them. There is formaldehyde in a lot of things. That was one of the concerns in the FEMA trailers or any trailers, because it is in the plastics and insulation.

  20. #45
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ILoveToQuilt View Post
    Wonder what the chemicals do to the septic systems? Maybe better NOT to wash lots of fabric as it might poison the leach field. Does anyone know where to find an answer to this question? Thanks.
    Oh, geeze, Louise! I hadn't thought about that! we are on septic...my brother is in waste water treatment (teaches at a U) I'll ask and see what he thinks.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  21. #46
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ILoveToQuilt View Post
    Wonder what the chemicals do to the septic systems? Maybe better NOT to wash lots of fabric as it might poison the leach field. Does anyone know where to find an answer to this question? Thanks.
    Remember you are getting formaldylhyde in clothing , sheets, etc. it not just in your quilting fabric, and has been there for years.

  22. #47
    Super Member Sienna's GiGi's Avatar
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    I'm glad Joann's posted this. I hope more shops do in the future since there are so many new quilters nowadays.
    Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.

  23. #48
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    According to one of the above links, methanol is formaldehyde.
    jean

  24. #49
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Remember the trailer provided to people in new Orleans after Katrina that couldn't be used? It was because of formaldehide used in the paneling etc inside. No one will ever be able to live in those trailers.

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