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Thread: Fractured Quilt???

  1. #1
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    Anyone ever heard of a fractured quilt top? I went to my LQS today and they had a wall hanging in there that really caught my eye. I saw their book laying under the table and it was Fractured something or something Fractured. It looked like they took the piece of fabric and cut it entirely into 2 " squares and then like a puzzle, sewed it all back up again.

  2. #2
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    Too bad you don't have a picture, that sounds pretty cool.

  3. #3
    Super Member jayelee's Avatar
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    Definition of Quilt Fracture Painting
    By Ruth Eshbaugh, eHow Contributor .
    Definition of Quilt Fracture PaintingRuthieonartFractured quilts are appliquéd quilts or quilt paintings that have an extra step added to the design. Typically, an appliqué quilt is a reproduction of a picture or shape that has been cut out and sewn on top of a background fabric. There are fabric wall art pieces that look like paintings. A fractured quilt is an appliqué quilt that, during the design process, is divided into blocks or unnatural lines and then pieced together. The result of fracturing the design can be as simple as dividing the design into quadrants, fracturing it like a broken window pane, or as complex as distorting it like a cubist painting. The results depend on how much the design has been broken up and how it is arranged.
    .History

    BargelloFractured quilts come from several traditional quilt processes; appliqué quilts, Bargello quilts and crazy quilts. Fractured quilt paintings have a modern twist. A Bargello quilt forms an optical pattern by using strips of fabric pieced in varying width and depth. The pieced fabric is cut again into strips of varying widths and then pieced together. The strips are shifted up and down to create a chevron pattern. The colors are harmonious, typically increasing from dark to light.
    Fractured quilts are also similar to crazy quilts when they are divided into irregular sections. The main difference between the 2 is that fractured quilts use a picture as a reference. The fractured quilt is representational while a crazy quilt forms random designs from scraps of fabric.
    Supplies You Need
    To make a fractured quilt you will need a reference photo, paper to make patterns from, a pencil, access to a copier to make patterns, scissors, fabric and thread to match and a sewing machine.
    Considerations
    Choose a reference photo or drawing. Keep it simple. Large florals and landscapes are good choices. Avoid using the human face because of the distortion. Enlarge the photo or drawing to the size you want the quilt square.
    Process
    Make 2 copies of the reference drawing or enlarged photo. Cut both copies in quarters or in more pieces at random angles, depending on how you chose to fracture the design. One copy will become the pattern for the shapes that form the background fabric pieces. The other copy will become the pattern for the picture pieces. Make the background pattern by tracing the shapes and adding ¼ inch all around the shapes. To make the picture pieces, cut the picture out of the background. Trace each piece of the picture, adding a ¼-inch border around the whole picture piece.
    Cut the fabric using the patterns. Appliqué the picture pieces to the background fabric. When you have the fractured pieces complete, sew the finished pieces together.
    Use the quilt blocks as a quilted wall hanging or as part of a bigger quilt.
    Collaboration
    Some quilt artists use a collaborative process to make a fractured quilt square. Each quilter makes a quilt square fractured in quarters but does not piece the finished quarters together. The quarter pieces are given to 1 of the members of the quilting group. She combines the quarter pieces together randomly and then gives the member 4 finished quarter pieces. The quilter receives a mix of quarter pieces made from different fabrics and with different techniques. The quilt group member then pieces her quadrants together.
    .

    Read more: Definition of Quilt Fracture Painting | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5105668_de...#ixzz1AryE3fpV

  4. #4
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    Here's a short tutorial that I got off a site somewhere, unfortunately I don't know what site. Hope it helps.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  5. #5
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    That's what it looked like. Kind of like your eyes are on the fritz. I did break the rule and looked at the back of it and it was just little blocks sewed back together. It was a big pink mum flower on a black background with bright green leaves. I wish I could remember the name of the book I saw.

  6. #6
    Super Member athenagwis's Avatar
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    Was this the book?

    http://www.amazon.com/Fabulous-Fract.../dp/B0026XRCXW

    I know a few people on the board have made these quilts, they do look very cool!

    Rachel

  7. #7
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    Yes, that's the one. Isn't that neat?

  8. #8
    Senior Member RatherB Quilting's Avatar
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    Kinda makes my eyes hurt. LOL :)

  9. #9
    Super Member charmpacksplus's Avatar
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    I've got that book on sale right now.....

    http://www.charmpacksplus.com/fabulo...esslinger.html

  10. #10
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    Just got the book Fabulous Fractures. Did you do a block??
    I am trying.
    Karen

  11. #11
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    I haven't made a block yet. I have read the book twice, but think I need to read it again.

  12. #12
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    Hi, I am brand new to the board, so maybe you have already received a reply. I recently took a class on fractured quilts and they are gorgeous and much simpler than they look. Yes, they basically are 2" squares sewn back together. I can give you a quick explanation of how to make one. You need 2 2/3 yds of fabric. Cut along the fold the entire way. Choose one of the halves. If you want only a wall hanging, just use one half. If you want to make a quilt w/ borders, you will repeat the process I am going to describe with the other half. You need 4 repeats from the 2 2/3 yds. Cut them out, they usually are between 21 & 23 inches wide. Pick 2 of the repeats and this is your A stack. The other 2 become your B stack. At this point, you will need some masking or blue painters tape so you can label all the strips you will be cutting with a rotary cutter. Place the 2 A pieces directly on top of each other. Starting from the Left, cut the set into 3" strips. Label each set of strips A1, A1 A2, A2, A3, A3, etc...so the top first cut is A1 and the strip beneath it is your other A1. Put the 2 B pieces directly on top of each other. CUT OFF a 1 1/2" strip from the left and discard it. Then from the left, cut the B set into 3" strips labeling them B1, B1, B2, B2, etc as you did the A set. At this point, a design wall comes in very handy, but if you don't have one, spread it out on the floor. Pin up on the wall, 2 sets: They will be exactly the same when you get done. A1, B1, A2, B2, A3, B3, A4, B4. Once you have the 2 sets up on the wall, it is time to start sewing. The" A" strip ALWAYS needs to be on the bottom when you sew an A and B together initially. Each seem needs to be pressed OPEN. A sewer's ham works great for pressing seams open. After you have sewn all the strips together, you will have two identical pieces. Call one block A and one block B. Rotate each block counter-clockwise one turn and STOP. Once again, one block becomes A and the other B. Starting with with the A block, cut 3" strips all the way to the end....if the last strip is not 3" that's o.k., just hold onto it. Label with the tape again, A1, A2, A3, A4, etc. This time, you only have one of each though! Then from Block B, CUT Off 1 1/2 inches, DISCARD the piece and start cutting 3 " strips again. Labeling as you go, B1, B2, B3, B4,etc. Now, once again, pin the strips on the wall...A1, B1, A2, B2, A3, B3, A4, B4......PIN, PIN, PIN....I pinned at every intersection and for the first time in my life, sewed over pins, and all of my corners match exactly...so, if your o.k. with having a dull needle at the end and not too worried about knocking the machine's timing off, you should be fine. Well, that is probably a whole lot of explaining and it may sound confusing, but it is truly simple if you can watch somebody do it or have pictures. If I was computer savvy, I would try to upload pixs as I went along and show you, but I'm not. The book you probably saw was "Fabulous Fractures." This is basically a simplified way of doing all that is taught in that book. So, maybe purchase the book and read through these directions a few times and see what happens. Hope I did not thoroughly confuse you. You can email me if none of it makes sense, or if you have any questions, I'd be happy to help. Happy Quilting!

  13. #13
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    Would love to see your quilt.

  14. #14
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    sorry, haven't heard of it, sounds cool

    Quote Originally Posted by rexie
    Anyone ever heard of a fractured quilt top? I went to my LQS today and they had a wall hanging in there that really caught my eye. I saw their book laying under the table and it was Fractured something or something Fractured. It looked like they took the piece of fabric and cut it entirely into 2 " squares and then like a puzzle, sewed it all back up again.

  15. #15
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    thanks for the explanation

    Quote Originally Posted by edkiro
    Hi, I am brand new to the board, so maybe you have already received a reply. I recently took a class on fractured quilts and they are gorgeous and much simpler than they look. Yes, they basically are 2" squares sewn back together. I can give you a quick explanation of how to make one. You need 2 2/3 yds of fabric. Cut along the fold the entire way. Choose one of the halves. If you want only a wall hanging, just use one half. If you want to make a quilt w/ borders, you will repeat the process I am going to describe with the other half. You need 4 repeats from the 2 2/3 yds. Cut them out, they usually are between 21 & 23 inches wide. Pick 2 of the repeats and this is your A stack. The other 2 become your B stack. At this point, you will need some masking or blue painters tape so you can label all the strips you will be cutting with a rotary cutter. Place the 2 A pieces directly on top of each other. Starting from the Left, cut the set into 3" strips. Label each set of strips A1, A1 A2, A2, A3, A3, etc...so the top first cut is A1 and the strip beneath it is your other A1. Put the 2 B pieces directly on top of each other. CUT OFF a 1 1/2" strip from the left and discard it. Then from the left, cut the B set into 3" strips labeling them B1, B1, B2, B2, etc as you did the A set. At this point, a design wall comes in very handy, but if you don't have one, spread it out on the floor. Pin up on the wall, 2 sets: They will be exactly the same when you get done. A1, B1, A2, B2, A3, B3, A4, B4. Once you have the 2 sets up on the wall, it is time to start sewing. The" A" strip ALWAYS needs to be on the bottom when you sew an A and B together initially. Each seem needs to be pressed OPEN. A sewer's ham works great for pressing seams open. After you have sewn all the strips together, you will have two identical pieces. Call one block A and one block B. Rotate each block counter-clockwise one turn and STOP. Once again, one block becomes A and the other B. Starting with with the A block, cut 3" strips all the way to the end....if the last strip is not 3" that's o.k., just hold onto it. Label with the tape again, A1, A2, A3, A4, etc. This time, you only have one of each though! Then from Block B, CUT Off 1 1/2 inches, DISCARD the piece and start cutting 3 " strips again. Labeling as you go, B1, B2, B3, B4,etc. Now, once again, pin the strips on the wall...A1, B1, A2, B2, A3, B3, A4, B4......PIN, PIN, PIN....I pinned at every intersection and for the first time in my life, sewed over pins, and all of my corners match exactly...so, if your o.k. with having a dull needle at the end and not too worried about knocking the machine's timing off, you should be fine. Well, that is probably a whole lot of explaining and it may sound confusing, but it is truly simple if you can watch somebody do it or have pictures. If I was computer savvy, I would try to upload pixs as I went along and show you, but I'm not. The book you probably saw was "Fabulous Fractures." This is basically a simplified way of doing all that is taught in that book. So, maybe purchase the book and read through these directions a few times and see what happens. Hope I did not thoroughly confuse you. You can email me if none of it makes sense, or if you have any questions, I'd be happy to help. Happy Quilting!

  16. #16
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    The book is called Fabulous Fractures

  17. #17
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    The book is called Fabulous Fractures

  18. #18
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    Sorry for the duplicate posting.

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