Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 67

Thread: Gardening with quilting scraps

  1. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Firmly North Georgia
    Posts
    840
    I compost them because, yes, they get tangled in the tiller. Stuff things with them? I could have a couple of sofas by now.

  2. #27
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    261
    I know that newspapers makes a great mulch. Just think about where all that printing ink goes. Printers ink and dye contaminate the soil. I am sorry to be a downer. Just think about it.

  3. #28
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,028
    On the other end of the scale, we had a lot of LARGE pieces of polyester double knit and did not want them for quilting. DH sewed them together on his treadle and made a garden quilt for covering the garden on frost nights. Works great, doesn't blow away, doesn't decay (we leave it out most of the time). And it is colorful.
    He made it HUGE and I wound up cutting it in half to make the pieces more manageable. It was very heavy all in one piece.

  4. #29
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,028
    Quote Originally Posted by glowworm
    I know that newspapers makes a great mulch. Just think about where all that printing ink goes. Printers ink and dye contaminate the soil. I am sorry to be a downer. Just think about it.
    Newspaper Inks

    Newspapers were once printed using dyes and pigments which contained hazardous minerals like lead, cadmium and chromium. But according to the Newspaper Association of America (NAA) efforts were taken to address this issue, and slowly heavy metals were phased out of the inks. To encourage more and more recycling of the newspapers, soy-based inks were developed that made newspapers absolutely safe and devoid of any harmful inks.

    NAA states in its website that most heavy metals were phased out of printing inks in the 1970ís as per the new regulations set by EPA. It also says that although there are a few metals that are still used in trace amounts to make certain pigments, they cannot be considered hazardous because of their very low concentration.

    from
    http://www.brighthub.com/diy/lawn-ga...les/71007.aspx


    I will have to try this, I battle weeds every year.

  5. #30
    Super Member Homemother's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,048
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by glowworm
    Fabric takes a long time to decay. The dye in the fabric will contaminate the soil. The soil will be unfit for organic gardening. I don't know the purpose of gardening with quilt scraps but I do know the dye will contaminate. Hope this will help.
    Yes, I was wondering about the chemicals in the fabric and dyes. I'll check it out.

  6. #31
    Member SusieG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    23
    Now is also the perfect time of year to put your scraps out for the birds to build nests with. We feed the birds all winter long and in the spring rather than putting suet in the suet holder put in your scraps. :-)

  7. #32
    Senior Member LindaG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    343
    I have used small scrap strips as tomato ties and they are still in pretty good shape at the end of one season, so I would say it may take a whole for the pieces to break down in the soil.

  8. #33
    Senior Member sall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    404
    yes! I do not put my scraps straight into the soil, but I always put them in my compost bin, along with all my shredded paper.

  9. #34

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    104
    Use them on the outside of pots.Put out a box of the birds to use for nests.

  10. #35
    pbreon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warrensburg, MO
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by tjradj
    The birds love small strips! We once had a robin's nest that had a lovely yellow piece of nylon rope holding it together. Cotton would be much more eco friendly.
    Yepers!!! I have thrown out thread scraps, and later found the colors in many nests!! the birds love the threads and scraps to buld nests.... try it !! it is fascinating how a bird can weave these pieces in their nests!!! :-o

  11. #36
    Super Member omak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Central Washington State
    Posts
    6,053
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    I was on google for awhile before making the original post. i kept trying to search on till + cotton fabric, garden + cotton fabric etc. but had a brain burp and didn't try looking under compost. I just did and cotton fabric is one of the items listed under many sites as being good to add to your compost pile, so looks like another use for all those crumbs too small to quilt with.
    As long as you don't let the fabric clump together, it should break down, obviously, but the other thing it will do is keep the soil from packing together (as in, too much sand in the soil) and the batting should hold moisture so your plants have more access to water, longer. Good to know and think about the composting issue.
    The thing about composting, especially if you are just starting out - - it gets hot as it breaks down which is why putting compost directly in your garden can be a problem - - however, I don't think fabric would have that same issue. Without the chemicals on it, it is still not in the same category as rotting fruit and fresh manure. Cotton and wool is more like hair in the composting process - - I am not sure how those items break down, but I do know that they are not considered "hot" ... this will be an interesting thread to keep track of.

  12. #37
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    I organic garden, and would not use fabric in my compost due the chemicals, but I have been assured that newspaper is commonly used in todays organic composting!

    I think I will try the newspaper cover and maybe put some straw on top instead of grass clippings, since we have so many weeds!

    NOW, if I thought a mole might eat the fabric and choke to death, I would stuff the holes with my very best scraps....
    but since there is no guarantee he would eat it, I just dug out the beds 3 feet down and put chicken wire down and an organic landscaping cloth, then filled the beds back in...darn moles....

  13. #38
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    261
    Thank you, I stand corrected.

  14. #39
    Super Member GramaLaura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Georgetown TX
    Posts
    4,379
    Quote Originally Posted by McQuilter
    I've not done or heard of that; but I love throwing my tiniest of scraps (thin, thin strips) and my thread scraps from embroidery out in the front yard for the birds. I have bushes around the side of my house and they nest in there in the summer and I can see my threads interwoven in their nests.
    I do this too! So fun to see a nest with my stuff hanging out :-D

  15. #40
    Kas
    Kas is offline
    Super Member Kas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Renton, WA
    Posts
    2,050
    Quote Originally Posted by glowworm
    Thank you, I stand corrected.
    I don't think you have been proven wrong on the fabric issue. I was thinking the same thing. The dyes in fabric are not meant to be eaten, but maybe the harmful to humans part washes out in the process. On the other hand, if you wear lipstick, you are eating cadmium every day! They don't consider the amounts in it to be dangerous. It is a carcinogen and even paint tubes have the warnings on them with some manufactuers even finding replacement pigments for the cadmium.

  16. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    90
    Blog Entries
    2
    Love your idea of growing a wildflower quilt. Let me know if it works!!!

  17. #42
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pinehurst, N.C.
    Posts
    260
    Show us the quilt when it blossoms out!!!

  18. #43
    saf
    saf is offline
    Super Member saf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,178
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    I recently read somewhere that you could till scraps of cotton fabric into your garden to amend the soil. Has anyone done this? What about 100% cotton batting? I have a bunch of scraps that are too small to use and was thinking about doing this. It sure would be pretty! This would be a flower garden not vegetable garden. Maybe if I plant the scraps, I'll grow a wildflower quilt!
    I used both wool fabric and cotton on the compost heap. Just cut them up very small. Several of the County Councils here in the UK give advice on composting including cotton and wool. :lol:

  19. #44
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Heber City, UT
    Posts
    541
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    ... Maybe if I plant the scraps, I'll grow a wildflower quilt!
    Haha! Great idea! My husband uses strip scraps to tie up the tomatoes and pole beans...

  20. #45
    saf
    saf is offline
    Super Member saf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,178
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    I recently read somewhere that you could till scraps of cotton fabric into your garden to amend the soil. Has anyone done this? What about 100% cotton batting? I have a bunch of scraps that are too small to use and was thinking about doing this. It sure would be pretty! This would be a flower garden not vegetable garden. Maybe if I plant the scraps, I'll grow a wildflower quilt!
    http://www.sefton.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=2982 - Info on suitable material for composting. :mrgreen:

  21. #46
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Orchard Park, NY (near Buffalo, which is near Niagara Falls)
    Posts
    4,097
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have saved long skinny strips - selvedges etc - and tied the ends together and wound it all up like a ball, then used it to create colorful trellising for the pea vines to scramble up on. It works as well as jute twine for this purpose, and it amuses me to look at it.

  22. #47
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    north Fla
    Posts
    39
    We live in Florida. I compost and because my spouse has allergies and uses Kleenex by the boxfull, I put all of the used Kleenex and paper towels in the compost along with many, many newspapers, torn into strips. The disappear after about two weeks, in the summer -- a bit longer thru the winter. If dyes and newspaper ink were a problem, we would all be dead or in the hospital, long ago. It is amazing how all this material turns into the lovliest black soil in just a few weeks. If you haven't tried it - do so. We also compost every bit of kitchen waste, except meat and dairy products.

  23. #48
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Longarm Quilter NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,483
    Blog Entries
    1
    My opinion?! I wouldn't use them. There are better, quicker decomposing things out there to use - like black and white newspapers tore apart.

    I wouldn't use fabrics of any size because I use a rototiller and the fabric would get wound up on the tiller causing my *Free Tiller Man* to quit!

    I do use leftover strips to tie up my plants during the growing season.

    I know I read something about scraps for birds needing to be a certain length or width - but I can't remember exactly what it was. Maybe if they're too long the birds can get hurt...I don't remember. Will our bird lovers know?

  24. #49
    Senior Member brightstar_202's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    683
    cotton is a natural product and non toxic. Yes you can but I do not believe you will find a pretty flower garden quilt as the out come...LOL have fun and make sure you cover them well. It will help with holding water and blending the soil. It will deteriorate in a few years. Good luck and have fun Planting :D

  25. #50

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    127
    I save all my tiny pieces of fabric and batting and when I have enough, I stuff them into a pillow for a dog/cat bed to be donated to the Humane Society.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.