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Thread: Getting a quilt quilted----help

  1. #1
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    Getting a quilt quilted----help

    Hello ladies! I have a question or two for you. I have a friend who has some quilt tops that her husband's grandmother made. Just the tops, no batting, no backing. She would like to have that done but doesn't know enough about it. I'm not sure I understand the process either--I'm just learning to do the simplest things. How is this done? Would the batting be applied then get quilted and then be backed or would the whole thing be put together first then be quilted and are there places that do that? Any input would be appreciated! She is in Midlothian, TX

  2. #2
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Yes ... a quilt is assembled as a "sandwich" of backing, batting and the quilt top.

    And yes, again, there are people who will hand quilt them for you. Also, those who will machine quilt on their DSM or LA.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
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  3. #3
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    You need to buy batting that is approximately 2" longer on all 4 sides of the top and the same for the backing. You need to sew the backing to fit the quilt. I go to my local quilt shop and she sends mine off to a great gal to machine quilt them. I put the batting, backing and front all in the bag, not already sandwiched together. That's the quilter's job. At least where I have it done. It's very simple. This is a good community to ask questions. Everyone here is so helpful. So ask away. And welcome!!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  4. #4
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    The Dallas/Ft. Worth area is THE greatest place to be for beginning quilters, with a wealth of quilt stores, shows, long-arm quilters, research libraries, guilds, and so on. Find your closest quilt shops and visit them to ask for names of people that can help you locate quilters for finishing this quilt top. They will be able to give you specific instructions on what to do. What an adventure you have ahead of you!

    Jan in VA, formerly of Dallas, Keller, Greenville, and Austin, LOL!
    Jan in VA
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  5. #5
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    :-/

    Thanks so much for your help everyone! Well, unfortunately, I can't really help her with this because I live in Brentwood, CA. (We grew up together but I moved away later in life.) Even if I lived there I don't know if I could help--ha! But, I can help get her going in the right direction. My mother lives in Texas and may be able to help her with the backing but if she doesn't need to have it put together first then.... so, let me get this straight, sew the backing to fit the quilt --so the edges are finished? assuming that the edges of the top are finished or need to also be finished but not sewn together, right? OR is a binding put on? and then the batting just needs to be cut to the right size? Or both the backing and the batting need to be cut to 2" larger all the way around. I'm confused. I am really a step or two below an amateur.

  6. #6
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    The edges of the top and backing do not need to be "finished". That is what the binding is for. Check the tutorials on this Board to find one about creating the binding, and send that along to the quilter. The quilter will sew it to the front of the quilt when she is finished quilting it. It is generally the owner's responsibility to "slip-stitch" the binder to the back.

    Both the backing and the batting are at least 2" larger than the top, to allow for easing in. However, if you have any questions about that, line up a quilter first, and then ask her/him what she/he prefers as far as how much hang over they prefer for the backing and batting.

    If you have more questions, please feel free to ask. We're here to help! And please do post a photo when you're done! We'd love to see this quilt finished!
    MacThayer

  7. #7
    Senior Member QuiltingCrazie's Avatar
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    Sorry your confused, a completed quilt top to make it a quilt. You need a backing and batting and binding. If you send it to someone else you need to measure the quilt top width and height, for this to be the most accurate you measure through the middle of the quilt top in both directions. Once you get that measurement for example 60x80 you can figure out how much batting and backing and binding you need. I would recommend her looking for extra wide backing or muslin because she's a novice and because the age of the quilt it would be easier. A yard is 36 inches so to have enough length for 80 inches plus 6" (3" extra top and bottom) You would need 2 1/2 yards which is 90" if you get extra wide if not you need 5 yards of 44" wide fabric it's smart to get a couple extra inches depending on where you get it for cutting errors. You will need the same amount of batting (batting by the package will give you one piece). From there where you have to "sandwich" depends on whose quilting it. Sandwich= quilt top, batting, backing. After it's quilted the binding is put on either made from fabric, bought, or the backing fabric folded to the front. Most times when you get a quilt quilted you can pay a small fee and they will do the binding. Tell your friend this is not a cheap venture and your talking to quilt lovers so we all would say don't go the cheapest route because what she has are heirlooms...Hope that helps and good luck and happy quilting
    *Rachel*

  8. #8
    Member Tollergirl's Avatar
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    I'd find a shop and take the quilts in for them to look at first. There may be issues with the top, like wonkiness, not square, seams coming apart, whatever. The shop can also connect you to a finisher for quilting. The finisher (or the LQS) can help with the batting, backing and binding. My local LA quilter has giant rolls of batting, so she does not need pre packed batting. She also prefers 4" extra backing on all four side for mounting on the LA. So, suggest to your friend that she find an LQS and see how they can help her.

    I'd absolutely LOVE to have handwork done by my Gmother...Good Luck!

  9. #9
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    I agree w/ much of what has been said, but I do prefer a bit more on the sides - about 5 or 6 inches so that i can keep the top anchored in the frame (I hand quilt). If someone else will finish this for her - let them guide you on the batting. Personally, I like 100% cotton batting and would rather not quilt w/ the polyester battings. I do not like the way they come out - esp for something like you have, it deserves to have the best that you can afford.

    I feel the same way about the thread that I use...Hmmmm...I guess i'm a thread and cotton batting snob!!
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  10. #10
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    If she has a local quilt shop, that would be my first place to have the tops looked at. Are they antiques, hand pieced and maybe should be hand quilted? (They may be able to recommend someone to do that) Check to make sure the tops are all securely stitched, if not fix any problem areas. If she wants to learn to quilt them herself, they can recommend a class to take? They may also recommend someone to machine quilt them for her. A long armer would charge anywhere from $100 and up to do a double size quilt. The cost....If she quilts them herself, she will need a quilt batt...$20-30 for each quilt. She will need backing for the quilt, depending on the size (double) about 4 yards of fabric with a center seam about $60. I won't mention making the sandwich to quilt them herself because there are too many preferences and methods to list. If she has a quilt guild in her area they may be able to give some advice too.

  11. #11
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    The first step is for your friend and her husband to decide how much they can/or are willing to spend to finish the quilt tops they have. To make a quilt top into a quilt you need backing material a number inches bigger on all sides than the top, batting material same size as the backing and material to make a binding.
    As your friend isn't a quilter she would have to hire someone to finish the quilts. If the grandmother hand pieced(sewed) the top together they might want to have the quilt finished in the traditional manner. That is, the quilter would make a backing big enough, then layer the backing, batting and top on a large, hard surface. Once layered, she would then put safety pins every 3-4 inches through the layers to secure them. Once, secured the quilter would then hand quilt the quilt(sew through all 3 layers). There several ways to hand quilt, including using a hoop or quilt stand. After quilting the entire quilt the quilter would then make a binding and sew it to the quilt edges to finish them off. As you can see, this is a very labor intensive project. To hire someone to do this would be quite expensive but perhaps desirable if they want a traditional, heirloom look to the quilts.
    Regardless of whether the quilt top is hand sewn or machine sewn they can decide to have the tops finished using machine methods that are faster and less expensive. They can also decide to use polester batting which is less expensive than the more traditional cotton batting. They can find a longarm quilter("longarm" refers to the large sewing maching used) through a locoal quilt store or through the internet. Most longarm quilters, in addition to layering and quilting the quilts quite quickly, can piece a backing, supply batting and make and apply binding. Though a very new method, binding can be applied entirely by machine, another money saver. This second method is less expensive than the entirely hand method.
    So it all depends on what finished product would satisfy your firend and her husband and their budget. If they can go to a quilt show they could compare the differences between the two methods.
    Good luck to them in getting their grandmother's work finished.
    Sally

  12. #12
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    Thanks!

    OK, I understand now. I agree this project should get the best since it definitely is an heirloom worth preserving! Y'all are so great! thanks for all the help!

  13. #13
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    Hi, I always quilted my quilts myself, either hand quilting or tying, and I still like to hand quilt, however, when I had some quilt tops quilted, I was hooked. The quilting really made the quilt top "pop", and it was so much faster. As other people have said, bring your quilt tops to a quilt shop first. Some of the quilt tops may be very fragile, or too worn to be quilted, if you handquilt a quilt it is going to take a long time, so you want to be sure it would be worth the effort, the same as sending it out. Also sending the quilt out to be quilted, can be expensive. After deciding to quilt the quilt, ask the quilt store for some good machine quilters. Then I would call them and ask what would be involved, and some idea of what it costs. They will tell you what you need for the quilt sandwich. My machine quilter needs 4" around each side of the quilt. You have to provide the quilt backing, and either buy batting, or see if she will supply batting. Then piece the backing if neccesary, iron the top and the backing and send it off. You do not have to baste it. That all said, good luck with all your projects.

  14. #14
    Senior Member maryfrang's Avatar
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    Just remember when you finish older tops that need to be quilted the age of the quilts are from the date they were last touched so, if they are finished in 2012 that is the quilts are aged from 2012. The fabric may be older but the quilts are current date.

  15. #15
    Super Member kateyb's Avatar
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    If she wants them hand quilted she can ask at the local quilt store, they sometimes have a list of hand quilters. Some churches, & senior centers have hand quilting groups. I once stopped in a small town in Kansas for lunch across from the local library and they had hand quilters that met every week and worked on hand quilting in the library. The ladies also taught newbies.

  16. #16
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    Here is a video that explains getting a quilt ready to quilt. http://www.ehow.com/video_4437824_ma...ich-quilt.html

    This is used if you are going to quilt it on your machine. If you are hiring someone to do it -just give them the top, bottom and batting. They will to the rest.

  17. #17
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    I would call some of the quilt shops and ask if they could recommend someone who either hand quilts or machine quilts. You will probably have to buy the batting and backing.

  18. #18
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    Sometimes the long arm (LA) quilter will be able to bind the quilt, also. She should ask. There is a Quilt Show in Midlothian in the Spring, I think. I went to one there several years ago. Google to find it. There will be resources there.

  19. #19
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    There is a great Quilt Shop in you town. They would be glad to help you. Downtown.

  20. #20
    Senior Member joann hussey's Avatar
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    How lucky for your friend to get older quilt tops, I would suggest having them hand quilted .

  21. #21
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    I live in Texas; I know where Midlothian is; and my mission is to spread the word to get those stored quilt tops completed !!! I've finished some vintage quilt tops recently for other ladies who are not able to do it themselves. I'd be happy to visit with your friend. I have a blog where she can see some of my work, but I'm not sure about the 'rules' on posting personal stuff here. If you ....or she ..... is interested, you can e-mail me a personal note. Wishing you both the best!
    Linda

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