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Thread: Groovy boards or pantograms?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wendys Quilts's Avatar
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    I am looking at both of these for the future. Does anyone use them? If so, any info would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I found the groovy boards to be expensive, I love pantos

  3. #3
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    I don't know much about the groovy boards,but I think people either buy a couple and keep stopping and moveing the boards (which I wouldn't want to do) or the buy enough to go the whole width of the quilt. I use pantograms. Usually I find a pattern I like, then I copy and paste into as many pages as I need.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wendys Quilts
    I am looking at both of these for the future. Does anyone use them? If so, any info would be greatly appreciated.
    I use pantographs alot and I enjoy using them. Most of them are very precise and easy to use. I have used the groovy boards a few times and one thing that I have noticed with the groovy boards is that if you have to backtrack in a certain area it doesn't always backtrack exactly where you quilted before. I guess you could say there is a little wiggle room there. Other than that they aren't to bad. Oh, I just remember something else - if you break a thread or run out of bobbin and need to move the machine you have to remember to pull the stylus out of the groovy board or you can't move anywhere except in the design area so that can be a little bit of a hassle too. Hope this helps you. Plus groovy boards are alot more expensive than pantographs and take up more room for storing.

    Thanks,
    Sherryl
    Candlequilter

  5. #5
    Senior Member Wendys Quilts's Avatar
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    Yes the groovy boards are expensive. What pantograms are the easiest then? I tried flowers once and it turned out aweful lol. Also my machine is a 9" throat. What size pentagram would be best?

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    What are groovy boards and pantos? and how would you use them? I have to say over here panto is pantomime with a principle boy who is a girl, and Dames who are men. I always new we were rather eccentric over here!!! It is held in the theatre at Christmas time, I think it is mainly a British idea.

  7. #7
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    pantos...groovy board were too expensive. Had some with my mid-arm...never used them!

  8. #8
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    Our LQS rents time on the Handiquilter and I took a class in using it. I was told the groovy boards take practice to learn. The ladies at the quilt shop said they have never gotten the hang of them and none of the customers use them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wendys Quilts
    I am looking at both of these for the future. Does anyone use them? If so, any info would be greatly appreciated.

  9. #9
    Super Member 0tis's Avatar
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    I like the groovy boards - very quick - I did buy 3 of them so I can get real close to covering side to side - It's just a quick way to get a quilt done. I have panto's but they are harder to line up the rows. Good thing about panto's there are a million different ones - groovy boards not so much.

  10. #10
    Super Member KathyAire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wendys Quilts
    Yes the groovy boards are expensive. What pantograms are the easiest then? I tried flowers once and it turned out aweful lol. Also my machine is a 9" throat. What size pentagram would be best?
    I think one of the easiest pantos is 'Chantilly Lace'. I don't know what size you would need. My machine has about a 22" throat.

  11. #11
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    With a 9" throat machine you can only use about a 5-6" panto. The takeup of the quilt uses some of the space in the throat. I use pantograms but would like to have the circles and baptist fan in the ez boards.

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    so i guess nobody is going to tell us what groovy boards and pantos are?

  13. #13
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    A panto is a paper pattern used in LA quilting and placed on a table behind the machine. You follow the design with a laser light and the machine stitches that design. A groovy board or EZ board is about 3 feet in length and has grooves in the shape of quilting designs carved in the board. You follow with a stylus much the same as the laser light and the design is stitched. With a board you need more than one to complete the length of the quilt or you have to stop and move it whereas with the paper panto you have about a 10 foot length to work with. Boards are expensive, pantos aren't so expensive. Does this help? :)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by greensleeves
    A panto is a paper pattern used in LA quilting and placed on a table behind the machine. You follow the design with a laser light and the machine stitches that design. A groovy board or EZ board is about 3 feet in length and has grooves in the shape of quilting designs carved in the board. You follow with a stylus much the same as the laser light and the design is stitched. With a board you need more than one to complete the length of the quilt or you have to stop and move it whereas with the paper panto you have about a 10 foot length to work with. Boards are expensive, pantos aren't so expensive. Does this help? :)
    Thank you Greensleeves yes it does, Happy Christmas and Quilting. Loopywren

  15. #15
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Two quilting friends had their hubbies make groovy boards for them that went all the way across the back of the machine. No moving the groovy boards. They really loved the results too. Of course it was much less expensive. Oh yeah, the hubbies really supported them after doing that work.

    ali

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    wow! thanks for the info. for those of us that are neofites it really helps to get an idea of what everyone is doing - even if it is light years from where we are at.

  17. #17

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    I had a woodworking friend build my quilt frame (12 feet long) and I love it but I'm not real steady using Pantos. I liked that you friends hubby's made their groovy boards. Could you tell me what type of wood they used or what was the material they used and was it done with a router? Appreciate your guidance in this matter. You can email me at [email protected]

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wendys Quilts View Post
    I am looking at both of these for the future. Does anyone use them? If so, any info would be greatly appreciated.
    Have you checked out the paper pantographs at www.annebright.com I really enjoy them.

  19. #19
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    How can these work with an ordinary domestic machine? I see so many beautiful pictures on here of perfect quilting and design and have marvelled at the standard. Are these pantograms the secret? Are these re-usable like a plastic template? Sorry, please excuse my ignorance, unfortunately am struggling to visualise how I could use something like this to improve my own quilting.

  20. #20
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheilz View Post
    How can these work with an ordinary domestic machine? I see so many beautiful pictures on here of perfect quilting and design and have marvelled at the standard. Are these pantograms the secret? Are these re-usable like a plastic template? Sorry, please excuse my ignorance, unfortunately am struggling to visualise how I could use something like this to improve my own quilting.
    I don't think the pantographs can be used with a regular sewing machine, with the mid arm or long arm set ups, the machine moves (thus can follow the pattern) vs the quilt being moved on a home sewing machine.
    However, you can make a long template to stitch a border, or a centre motif. If it's a centre motif, drawn one 100 % size you want, stack wax paper squares the same size together, stitch pattern (without thread). This punches the pattern onto each square. You then iron the squares onto your quilt top, stitch (with thread) and then pull the paper off. For a long stretch/border, you find your repeat, drawn once onto a long strip of wax paper, fold the paper into accordian folds the size of your repeat and then stitch (without thread) so you have a template. Iron into place, stitch (with thread) and tear paper off.

    I hope this is helpful, if you need more detail, please PM me.

    GEMRM

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandysb1 View Post
    I had a woodworking friend build my quilt frame (12 feet long) and I love it but I'm not real steady using Pantos. I liked that you friends hubby's made their groovy boards. Could you tell me what type of wood they used or what was the material they used and was it done with a router? Appreciate your guidance in this matter. You can email me at [email protected]
    All groovy boards I have seen are made of a white hard synthetic material, not wood. I think wooden boards would be heavier than the synthetic ones, and the grooves would probably wear with use, too, especially if a softer wood was used.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wendys Quilts View Post
    Yes the groovy boards are expensive. What pantograms are the easiest then? I tried flowers once and it turned out aweful lol. Also my machine is a 9" throat. What size pentagram would be best?
    If you are looking for an easy pantograph, look for something with a fairly open pattern so if you go outside the lines you will not overlap another stitching line. Also look for a pattern which will look good if the shapes end up not consistent because you didn't follow the lines exactly: flowers are good, because they will look nice even if they are not all the same---avoid geometric repeats, which will glaringly show inconsistent sizes or shapes. Some beginning machine quilters have problems with points and avoid them at first, but I had no problem with them. One of my first pantographs was an easy holly leaf pattern with all those pointed edges on the holly leaves. The thing with points is you have to learn how long to linger at the point: too long, and you have a build-up of thread there--not long enough, and you have no point at all, but a squared off corner. When I come to a point, I think of a ping pong ball hitting a wall and bouncing off quickly, and that works for me. You said your flowers turned out aweful: it just takes practice, practice, practice. Try doing a dry run (or several) before you actually stitch, by just following the pantograph with the light until you feel comfortable stitching it well. I do that every time I start a panto, even if it's one I have done before. Also, you have to remember to look ahead of where your laser light is, so your motions are smooth. It's kind of like driving a car---you aren't looking at the pavement just ahead of your bumper. Always look ahead to the next curve, the next point, etc., and your stitching lines will flow smoothly. That's what makes it look good, not so much that you followed the line exactly.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GEMRM View Post
    I don't think the pantographs can be used with a regular sewing machine, with the mid arm or long arm set ups, the machine moves (thus can follow the pattern) vs the quilt being moved on a home sewing machine.
    However, you can make a long template to stitch a border, or a centre motif. If it's a centre motif, drawn one 100 % size you want, stack wax paper squares the same size together, stitch pattern (without thread). This punches the pattern onto each square. You then iron the squares onto your quilt top, stitch (with thread) and then pull the paper off. For a long stretch/border, you find your repeat, drawn once onto a long strip of wax paper, fold the paper into accordian folds the size of your repeat and then stitch (without thread) so you have a template. Iron into place, stitch (with thread) and tear paper off.

    I hope this is helpful, if you need more detail, please PM me.

    GEMRM
    Thankyou. Something I can visualise !

  24. #24
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    There are smaller pantographs for short arm systems. Be aware that as you quilt, your take up bar will eat up some of your quilt area. The bigger the quilt, the smaller the area as you get to the end. Some quilters will reload the quilt the other direction to finish a long quilt.

    Digitech Patterns will print out your pantograph at the size you choose. It has default size (if you dont' choose a diff size) and a suggested size (that will tell you if you can go smaller or bigger. you still CAN pick them, but the design may be squashed too small or stretched too large). Becareful! I always want them ALL! lol

    http://www.digitechpaper.com/default.asp

    Pantos by Dave Hudson are usually a good bet for starting out. His have larger designs and not too much detail.
    Practice will help you tackle the more detailed as you go. I would suggest getting a few 5 inch designs and practicing with them for a few quilts till you get a rhythm and some confidence. PM for me if you need a cheerleader! Been there, done that!
    Beth in AZ
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    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  25. #25
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    I just came across this thread. I know it is very old but a couple were wanting to know what a panto was. I am posting a picture of one of mine on my table. This one is very easy and I use it alot.Name:  007.JPG
Views: 169
Size:  1.01 MB

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