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Thread: Hand Quilting and...I have been bad!

  1. #1
    Rob
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    First off, after the wonderful welcome I received a while back, I disappeared. I knew I was not able to work on the quilt I started til later in the year. While I should also be here to support others...I had nothing to contribute yet. Sorry....

    My question - anyone know of a video that shows hand quilting from different angles?

    I mean...if you sit and hand quilt, I assume you do not move around or move around the quilt so much so that....you are always quilting in a direction that is towards you. Anyone know what I mean? It is hard to describe but I started Sunday working on the quilt I started earlier in the year and it seems I can only go from right to left in a downard fashion.

    I was looking for a video that shows how people hand quilt in other directions (I assume they do...right?). I tried YouTube and a list from DonnaRae (from this site). I think I have the basic rocking down (with improvement to be made!)...just need to know how to quilt in other directions.

    Anyway...sorry to ramble.

  2. #2
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Actually I do continually move the quilt to favor the needle going in a direction that is easy for me. So far I have done some lap sized quilts. I have two tops for a queen sized bed but have not started the hand stitching yet.

    To answer your question.........you might try Youtube. They seem to have videos about everything.

  3. #3
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    If you are hand quilting with a lap frame then there is not a problem--just turn the frame with your quilt in it and you are always quilting in the direction that is most comfortable to you. A floor frame does have some limitations and if you have difficulty quilting away from yourself then you may want to consider a lap frame.

  4. #4
    mgshaw's Avatar
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    I cant quilt away from myself and I have seen videos on the subject! But sorry, dont remember where they are. I use a hoop so I can turn it as needed.

  5. #5
    Super Member retrogirl02's Avatar
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    as others have said, I quilt only in the direction that seems natural to me and use a hoop to move the quilt to fit my style also. I've learned a lot on youtube there are videos on everything, if not---ask a local quilter's group if you could visit. Bring goodies & they're likely to share some tips. There are also other online sites for video clips and check your local library to see if a group meets there or hang out in the quilting section or visit a local quilt shop. Someone is bound to help you in person.

  6. #6
    Senior Member triciasquilts's Avatar
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    I know Alex Anderson had a show on hand quilting on Simply Quilts at one time. I actually learned alot from that particular show. You might want to try to look for it thru HGTV's website or google Simply Quilts.
    I use a lap quilt so I can move in whatever direction is comfortable for me.

  7. #7
    Super Member zyxquilts's Avatar
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    Alex Anderson has hand quilting video lessons on www.thequiltshow.com - you have to be a member, but basic membership is free.
    Also, you can google "hand quilting" or "hand quilting dvd" to see what else is available. I have seen a few demos of hand quilting in all directions, but I'm mostly a machine quilter myself. :wink:

  8. #8
    Rob
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    Thank you for your advice and words.

    I think I started out wrong cause I was using alot of pins instead of basting. I need to baste I bet and that will help. When I was shifting the quilt around, I was getting poked by the pins or they were coming out. I was beginning to wonder if I should be knowing how to work in different directions. Thank you for helping me feel better.

    Of course I am working on a twin sized quilt....probably large for a beginner. I have to realize that this is my first one, it will not be perfect and that I should treasure something I did by hand with all imperfections!

    I see all the wonderful works in the Pictures section and I hope I can become half as proficient as others. I remember when joining that some work stood out. I think mgshaw had one (if you liked the civil war fabrics) if I remember right. There are alot of inspirational people here.

    Anyway...thanks again!

  9. #9
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    A tip that was given during a hand quilting class I took is to apply 'Skin Shield' on the finger that catches the needle under the quilt. It is like a liquid bandage & protects the finger a little bit. You will be able to feel the needle soon than the little plastic pads you buy to put on the finger.

  10. #10
    racnquilter's Avatar
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    Rob, don't worry about what it will look like.....everyone was a beginner at one point. Actually my first one was a full/almost queen size. I am like several others, I use a lap quilt and move it so that I can sew in direction most comfortable for me. One major thing I learned from message boards is to NOT have the quilt tight in the frame, giving it some slack will make it easier to rock.

    Good luck and be proud of what you do, no matter what it looks like.

  11. #11
    Rob
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    Thanks Jannie. That is a good tip. My hands have thicker skin cause of working outside but I tell ya, in the short time I got back to this Sat and Sun, I said ouch a few times (and maybe a few other words too)!

    And thanks for the nice words racnquilter. I tend to be impatient and want to do well fast but you are right. I mean....I never really sewed before by hand (sewed on buttons and never by machine) and I sewed all the squares, a border, backing and I feel so proud of that.

    I am going to roll it out and post a pic in the next few days.

  12. #12
    Rob
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    I posted pics this evening anyway under the Pictures forum.

  13. #13
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    Instead of pins, there are quilters safety pins, although any safety pins will work. I have used them with a floor frame. I have also used different thimbles to enable me to quilt away from me. There is a hand held thimble thingy that works well to push the needle when quilting away from your body. Also check with churches in your area for hand quilters where you might be able to sit in and pick brains! That's what i did!

  14. #14
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I'm a handquilter for hire so I do it in all kinds of ways. If I am using a handheld frame I just turn the frame quilt and all to a more comfortable position.

    I have two floor frames. Both are about the widith of a chair. I usually baste with safety pins or have a long armer baste it for me. One thing that works really well for me is to have lots of needles going at the same time. If I am cross hatching I might have a needle in each row. When they are all completed from edge to edge of the frame I either turn the hoop to allow me to go the other way or unhoop and move the whole quilt. I also learned long ago to use both hands. It makes it much easier to reach. Any one who played the paino or even is used to typing should be able to master both hands fairly easily. It just takes a little practice. I do use a thimble on my left thumb as I push with the thumb when I am using my left hand. They make a little short black leather one I prefer for my thumb. I use the longer deer skin one on my right middle finger.

  15. #15
    Super Member lfw045's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpspeedy
    Hi,

    I'm a handquilter for hire so I do it in all kinds of ways. If I am using a handheld frame I just turn the frame quilt and all to a more comfortable position.

    I have two floor frames. Both are about the widith of a chair. I usually baste with safety pins or have a long armer baste it for me. One thing that works really well for me is to have lots of needles going at the same time. If I am cross hatching I might have a needle in each row. When they are all completed from edge to edge of the frame I either turn the hoop to allow me to go the other way or unhoop and move the whole quilt. I also learned long ago to use both hands. It makes it much easier to reach. Any one who played the paino or even is used to typing should be able to master both hands fairly easily. It just takes a little practice. I do use a thimble on my left thumb as I push with the thumb when I am using my left hand. They make a little short black leather one I prefer for my thumb. I use the longer deer skin one on my right middle finger.
    Yep, that's the way I use my thimbles too........good idea having more than one needle going........thanks......

  16. #16

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    I only do handquilting. It's how I learned and all I know (for now). I only quilt towards myself and move the hoop around a lot. I didn't like the bunching it cause, so I started quilting around the "squares" or larger areas that I could do up, down, and sideways on the floor frame. Then I take the quilt off the floor frame and use a hoop for detail work.

    Lynette

  17. #17
    Super Member Barb M's Avatar
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    Hey Rob, i am going through the same growing pains! lol I'm trying to hand quilt a project, and have been picking a few peoples brains. What i've found out is some like a frame and some don't, some like a thimble and some don't. And so i've been alternating back and forth between hand held frame and no frame, thimble and no thimble! Driving myself crazy, because each way has it's plusses and minuses. When i use a hand held frame, it's so easy to turn in another direction, but my stitches come out really big in a frame because i can't rock it up and down enough. Without a frame, i'm continually trying to scrunch fabric up in my hand. And of course, i have trouble sitting for very long or i get leg cramps! lol So i find myself with the quilt over the back of an arm chair, and me standing and doing it! But, i keep learning so much from everyone here. I hadn't heard of having the fabric loose in the frame to make the rocking easier, so i'm sooo glad i just saw that, and i'm gonna give the hoop another try lol lol At the same time, i've just bought a darning foot for my machine, so im gonna see who wins this battle, the hand quilting or the machine :)

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