Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3
Results 51 to 65 of 65

Thread: Handquilters.... what to do for thumb pain?

  1. #51
    Dotsie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    946
    May be you get so deep concentrated that you don't realize that you hold the needle too tight?

  2. #52
    Senior Member nellebelles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    "stashed" away in a mound of fabric
    Posts
    674
    Quote Originally Posted by Maura
    I'm a reflexologist, so I am coming from that direction. Have someone massage your hand, using a drop of olive oil to reduce friction. His thumbs should be on the back of your hand, his fingers doing little rotations on the palm. Then, his fingertips should stroke the palm, wrist to knuckles. This should be relaxing. Next he should make circles on the pad below the thumb. Press with index finger and thumb between your index finger and thumb in the fatty area. It may hurt- a little pain is alright, don't get carried away. The pressure can be constant, or he can press and let go several times.

    Still with me. Have him use his thumb and index finger to stroke between the long bones on the backside of the hand (one finger on back of hand, other on palm). He should now be able to crack your knuckles easily as he lightly twists your fingers a little.

    He then runs a finger or thumb on the underside of your arm from your wrist (near thumb) along the bone about half way up the forearm. You'll find sore spots. He should massage your forearm.

    Stretch your hands, opening them up and closing them several times. Next, massage from the base of the skull to the center of the upper back. With all of this done, lie on the floor facing the ceiling. Put your arms out so you resemble the letter "t". Bring arms straight up so the hands meet. Drop back into the t. Do this twenty times.
    I wish I lived in Michigan...

  3. #53
    Super Member Nolee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Chili, New York (Rochester)
    Posts
    1,146
    Quote Originally Posted by #1piecemaker
    Put rubbing achohol on your fingers and thumb especiall y before you go to bed. It will pull the soreness right out of them.
    Do you know why this works?

  4. #54
    Super Member grammysharon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Monmouth, Oregon
    Posts
    5,882
    Blog Entries
    1
    Ditto
    Quote Originally Posted by the casual quilter
    For me, time is the only thing that helped.

  5. #55
    Super Member rushdoggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    1,032
    The answer to your question is it depends on why it hurts. If you have muscle cramps because you are using muscles you haven't used much before, then rest, heat (or cold) and NSAIDS and gradual building up of those muscles will work. You may have to cut down on the amount of time you sew at a time (down to 1 or 2 hours).

    If you have a dull ache, sharp pain or numbness or tingling you probably have a repetitive motion injury (carpal tunnel or tennis elbow are 2 examples) and you have some part of your hand/wrist inflamed and its causing pressure on a nerve. Again, you must rest it to allow for the swelling to go down, and NSAIDS and ice can do wonders.

    In either case, you may find a brace helps you avoid over-stressing the part of your wrist or hand that is getting hurt.

    I would recommend seeing a MD and letting he or she diagnose you, and seeing a physical or occupational therapist who specializes in hand issues. I won't poo-poo chiropractors, I have met a few who were really skilled at manual therapy, I will tell you that not all are equal and a few are borderline charlatans, so get a referral and look for someone with a good reputation. I would personally choose an upper extremity specialist therapist over a chiro, but that's probably because I am a therapist myself. :)

    Beth
    (aka occupational therapist)

  6. #56
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    12,131
    Blog Entries
    1
    when my hands/thumb gets too sore to continue i rub 'MYOFLEX' into my hands, it is grease-less; no smell; and eases arthritis...it also eases those cramping fingers from too much hand sewing :thumbup: a bit of that, a couple tylenols and a cup of tea and i'm usually ready to go back at it. i would recommend shorter sewing times.

  7. #57
    Super Member seamstome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,337
    While it is not bad advice to see an MD and an OT, my 30 years of experience dictates that most MD's dont have a clue about musculo-skeltal problems and you will spend alot of money getting nowhere and possibly end up with a gut bleed.

    While there may be charlatans in chiropractic, they are in every profession including all aspects of the medical field. Your "examination" most times in the FP's office will be cursory for this problem and the advice will be minimal. If you want it fixed rest, do alot of the home therapy prescibed and go to a chiropractor that works with extremity problems.

  8. #58
    Super Member Nolee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Chili, New York (Rochester)
    Posts
    1,146
    [quote=seamstome] you will spend alot of money getting nowhere and possibly end up with a gut bleed.{/quote]

    My doctor has told me that NSAIDs will kill your stomach which is why he doesn't recommend them longer than a day or two. He said people just want fast relief and don't ever look at the side effects. That's why I use an anti-inflammatory herbal combination that works wonders.

  9. #59
    Senior Member ljorange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    689
    My thumb doesn't hurt but my fingers get numb. I wear a wrist brace at night and it helps.

  10. #60
    Super Member rushdoggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    1,032
    Quote Originally Posted by seamstome
    While there may be charlatans in chiropractic, they are in every profession including all aspects of the medical field.
    Exactly, which is why you want to get a referral for a chiro to get someone with a good reputation and skills. That would be true for a hand therapist too.

    I will disagree, though, on having an MD start the process. Most MDs will gladly refer you to someone when you have a specialized problem, as they often don't have those skills, and in case there's something else going on its probably good to have it looked at first.

    You might also check your insurance ahead of time as referrals to chiros and therapists may have stipulations and you may need to choose from a smaller group of providers.

    To the OP I sure hope your hand feels better soon! And seamstome, its great you had a good experience with your chiro and found relief. No one should be in pain all the time!

  11. #61
    Super Member Nolee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Chili, New York (Rochester)
    Posts
    1,146
    I pulled a hamstring Saturday and went to the chiro last night and am so much better this morning. I went to three doctors over the years and they all poo-pooed chiros. Now I go to the chiro and hardly ever go to a doctor. My co-pay for my chiro is $20 and $40 for my doctor, so it works out well for me. I think doctors and surgeons are very necessary in certain situations but I'd opt for my chiro over them for anything bone or muscle related. And I don't need drugs!!

  12. #62
    Senior Member coloradosky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    806
    Quote Originally Posted by barney
    I find exercise is the best solution (for almost everything). I use a tennis ball to squeeze and flex the fingers and it helps a lot.
    I use this also. A few days before beginning to hand quilt I start exercising my hands using two rubber balls made for this practice. If you feel any pain while quilting, stop and limber up the hand and joints with the exercise. It does help to keep my hands free of pain.

  13. #63
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Clemmons, NC
    Posts
    1,057
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Nolee
    I pulled a hamstring Saturday and went to the chiro last night and am so much better this morning. I went to three doctors over the years and they all poo-pooed chiros. Now I go to the chiro and hardly ever go to a doctor. My co-pay for my chiro is $20 and $40 for my doctor, so it works out well for me. I think doctors and surgeons are very necessary in certain situations but I'd opt for my chiro over them for anything bone or muscle related. And I don't need drugs!!
    I give a big ditto here. However not all chiros are created equal. Just like a medical doctor, be sure to research before picking one. If all they do is per say crack your bones then beware. I have a great one but have not needed him lately, thank God.

  14. #64
    Super Member Nolee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Chili, New York (Rochester)
    Posts
    1,146
    Quote Originally Posted by chamby
    Quote Originally Posted by Nolee
    I pulled a hamstring Saturday and went to the chiro last night and am so much better this morning. I went to three doctors over the years and they all poo-pooed chiros. Now I go to the chiro and hardly ever go to a doctor. My co-pay for my chiro is $20 and $40 for my doctor, so it works out well for me. I think doctors and surgeons are very necessary in certain situations but I'd opt for my chiro over them for anything bone or muscle related. And I don't need drugs!!
    I give a big ditto here. However not all chiros are created equal. Just like a medical doctor, be sure to research before picking one. If all they do is per say crack your bones then beware. I have a great one but have not needed him lately, thank God.
    You are so right; they are not created equal. I love mine because he uses the "activator" and I'm not hearing those awful cracking sounds and don't have to move off the table or lay to the side and have them crack you. Few use the activator but it reminds me of the old cherry pitters with a doorstop rubber tip on it that he adjusts the bones with. NO pain, NONE!!!

    Also, I took someone else's advice on this thread and got some Cobroxin. MAN, that stuff is great. Thank you to whoever sent that. Walgreen's had two left and I got them. Online they were 2/$19.99 and I called the store and they gave the same price. When my husband went to get it, the girl charged him $19.99 apiece. He did his little, "Uh uh uh, we won't be doing that," as he wagged his finger back and forth on her. We got them for 2/$19.99. :) :) :)

  15. #65
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    226
    I havae had the same problem and I had it when I was in my 20's as well, soit was not arthritus.
    In between quilts (if there is such a time) I found excercise works. I go to the gym regularly and they have aNautilus machine that I call the quilter's machine. It is not a comon gym item, but it really works. It excercises the small muscles in yur hand and wrist.
    As you may not be able to find one, you might try:
    1. a small weight (2# -5#), hold it in your hand and wist your wrist about 12 X both hands. (like turning a door knob)
    2. a squeeze weight (pick up at a sporting goods store -- I think they come different strentgths) squeeze 6 X to start, both hands, and work up to 12 X.
    You need to strengthen your thumb muscles, ligaments, etc
    My discomfort is gone, baby gone.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.