Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Has anyone used the fun and done method of quilting as you go? >

Has anyone used the fun and done method of quilting as you go?

Has anyone used the fun and done method of quilting as you go?

Old 01-31-2009, 11:24 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Quilting G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 154
Default

I am thinking of using this method with my machine quilting samples. I am trying to learn. Anyway I thought I could combine the 20' blocks into a quilt for my bed. It can go between the sheet and bedspread if I don't like it.

Anyway my question is how sturdy would the quilt be with the only thing holding the quilt together is a single row of stiches?

Everyone here is so helpful...

Happy Quilting!
G
Quilting G is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 11:54 AM
  #2  
Power Poster
 
BellaBoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Front row
Posts: 14,648
Default

I took a class in the Fun and Done. It's not a fast way to make a quilt at all but you have a completed quilt when you finish the blocks. Having the two piece ruler for it makes it much easier. The quilt is very sturdy done this way. There is a video on how to do the Fun and Done here:



https://www.baysidequilting.com/stor...idCategory=284
BellaBoo is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 01:10 PM
  #3  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Alturas, CA
Posts: 8,955
Default

I'm not sure what you mean by the single row of stitches. Would you explain please?
pocoellie is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 01:43 PM
  #4  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Quilting G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 154
Default

With the quilt "fun and done" method, there is not fabric connecting the blocks. You cut and quilt your block sandwich with the backing 2 inches larger then the block and batting (Block and Batting are the same size).
Two of these sandwiches are sewn together back to back, the seam allowance is on the front and forms a sash around the block by folding it in half and top stitching. With a quilt you have the batting and backing reinforcing the pieced block so they are less likely to pull apart. I was just wondering if it would hold up to daily use on a bed.

G
Quilting G is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 02:58 PM
  #5  
Community Manager
 
PatriceJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Southeast Georgia, USA
Posts: 8,789
Default

they hold up just fine. you don't need that tool to make them, either.

cut a batting square. cut a backing square 2" bigger. use the first inch of any ruler to line up the batting on 2 sides and voila! it's centered.

also, although sturdiness isn't really a problem, if it worries you anyway, just topstitch an extra strip of sashing between the blocks.

zip ... zip ... zip ... yooze done. :wink:
PatriceJ is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 03:12 PM
  #6  
Super Member
 
mpspeedy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: rural Maryland
Posts: 1,564
Default

Bellaboo,

Thanks for the link to the tutorial. Years ago when I worked for a Bernina dealer they sent us to a company class where we did a similar method using prequilted fabric on a serger. I made a quilted pillow with a zipper in the back and a ruggle all constructed on the serger.

A nice thing about the Quilt and done technique is that only the top stitching stitches show on the front and it is a good way to use up batting scraps. I think I will try it on my next Linus quilt probably this week.
mpspeedy is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 04:05 PM
  #7  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Quilting G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 154
Default

Thanks for you replies. I viewed a tutorial video about machine quilting and the instructor said to practice on 20 inch sandwiches and I will need several and thought this would be a good way of using them to make a quilt. I just have this fear of a thread breaking and it just unraveling. I just can’t stand the thought of not doing something with them.

Now all I have to do is find some cheap, cheap fabric. I think I am going to use flannel for the batting so they will be extra warm and heavy.

Here is to filling up quilts with love and stitches.
Quilting G is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 07:28 PM
  #8  
Power Poster
 
littlehud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SW Iowa
Posts: 32,856
Default

I have wanted to try this. I need to finish my UFOs first. This may take a while.
littlehud is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:32 PM
  #9  
Power Poster
 
sewnsewer2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: FL
Posts: 16,568
Default

Thank you for posting this! I understand this perfectly and am going to give it a whirl sometime. :D
sewnsewer2 is offline  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:50 PM
  #10  
Super Member
 
butterflywing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: currently central new jersey
Posts: 8,623
Default

Originally Posted by PatriceJ
they hold up just fine. you don't need that tool to make them, either.

cut a batting square. cut a backing square 2" bigger. use the first inch of any ruler to line up the batting on 2 sides and voila! it's centered.

also, although sturdiness isn't really a problem, if it worries you anyway, just topstitch an extra strip of sashing between the blocks.

zip ... zip ... zip ... yooze done. :wink:
could you just put together all the back squares and then place all the batts and front pieces afterwards, and continue from there? wouldn't that be a time-saver?
butterflywing is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Texas_Sue
Main
9
07-08-2015 05:19 AM
Becca
Pictures
50
06-25-2010 08:47 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.