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Thread: Have you used fusible batting?

  1. #1
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    Have you used fusible batting?

    I'm making a bed quilt/covering using tooled suede, batting and a cotton backing. I don't want to quilt it like I normally do because it will take away from the tooled design. I also don't want the batting to shift and bunch. So my questions are:

    1.Would fusible backing be the best solution? It's new to me so is it double sided or just one sided? If one sided, I guess I'd fuse to the cotton and then finish the quilt.

    2. Should use batting and quilt it to the cotton and then assemble the it?

    Any suggestions, advice or experience you can share would be most appreciated.
    Thank you

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    Just one note of caution, fusible batting requires that you press it to fuse it. I donít think youíd want to do that with your suede. Iíd use a spray adhesive like 505 spray instead. However, both fusible batting a 505 spray are temporary and wash away, so quilting is still required to hold your sandwich/batting in place. Not sure if this what youíre looking for for info. And yes, fusible batting is fusible on both sides.

  3. #3
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    ​I love Hobbs 80/20 fusible but it does need to be ironed on the front and back of the quilt. I don’t know how you could do that with suede/leather.

  4. #4
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I love Hobbs 80/20 fusible but you could use spray basting. 505 or Sulky.

  5. #5
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    The fusible batting I've used in the past (not sure of the brand - bought it at JoAnns) made the quilt sort of stiff. I like using it on table runners and the like, but not so much on a bed quilt. Maybe make a sample?

  6. #6
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  7. #7
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I use it for craft projects like pot holders, hot pads, or placemats. It's too fussy for me to use for large size quilt.
    Your idea of quilting then adding the top is a good one. The suede may balloon up if washed but will go right back in place.
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  8. #8
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    I tried the Hobbs 80/20 fusible. It was okay, but will not buy it again. Part of it is probably me, because I don't like wrinkles in my quilting.
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  9. #9
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    I did fusible once, the finished quilt was super stiff and didn't relax, even after a few washings.

  10. #10
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I use 505 or Sulky and have used June Tailor spray also. it does make the quilt a bit stiff but not too much and it always washed out for me. maybe it was the brand or too much used? i spray it like hair spray, moving my hand all the time back and forth as I go down the quilt.

  11. #11
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I'm getting the impression that some of the responses assume you have a washable faux suede. Is that the case? And if so, is it pieced, or just one large area? If pieced and washable, you could use the temporary adhesive and stitch in the ditch to keep it attached and lined up permanently with the batting and back.

    To answer your question, there are fusible battings available that fuse on one side or both. I found them via Google but have not tried either. I have enough of a challenge when I use spray fuse, which is repositionable.
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  12. #12
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I should clarify. my brain isn't working today. the basting spray doesn't make the quilt stiff to me. the fusible batting can do it temporarily. sorry.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    Fusible battings still need to be quilted, the fusible washes away. If you don’t want to do very much quilting I would recommend fleece - it won’t separate or migrated with less quilting.
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    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    For your project, I would not use batting, I would use a well washed blanket so no quilting would be needed. If you are using real suede, how will you keep it clean? If you are using faux suede, you can do the same and never put it in a dryer, and only wash it in a “big boy” washer at a laundromat, and hang it on a shower curtain rod (moveable type that is wedged up, not nailed, inside the shower stall) with the quilt folded in half for a few hours, then turn it over so each side gets time to dry without creases. Good luck with your project.
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  15. #15
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    I tried fusible batting once and hated it. On a smallish table square, runner or placemats it would be okay though. Without seeing your tooled suede bed cover, I'll throw out a possibility. How about light weight polar fleece? I have used it for wall hangings and baby quilts. It functions both as a durable backing and a batting wouldn't be necessary. It should adhere naturally to the back of the suede top without need for pinning, etc.

  16. #16
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    How are you attaching the top? Will you only do a bit of stitching or none? If so, I would probably quilt the backing and batting in a simple design and then attach the top. This would hold the rest together without requiring stitching thru the suede or ironing it heavily to fuse. But, it would make it more like a duvet cover than a quilt.

  17. #17
    mac
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    I found fusible batting (used on a small project) a pain in the behind. It seems more troublesome than just pinning and quilting as necessary. Doing it on a piece of tooled suede seems kind of chancy. Why not try it on a very small sample piece of the suede and see what happens?

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