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Thread: Heavy quilt.

  1. #1
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    Heavy quilt.

    Hey guys. Iím looking to make a queen or king size quilt that weighs around 35lbs. The only specifics Iíve been asked for are a flannel backing, and grey tone fabrics. Any suggestions for batting or top fabric that will hold up well on such a heavy quilt?

  2. #2
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    If you want a heavy quilt, try cutting up old blue jeans for the top. There is a video on the net on how to cut denim circles, place squares of batt and flannel in the center of the circles and fold in the circles edges to form fake cathedral window effect.

  3. #3
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    HI and welcome to the board. Are you planning on putting weights into the quilt to get it to weigh this much? Like the weighted blankets they make for people with Autism? Here is a blog that should help you. But that 35lb sounds to heavy based on this link which states 5 to 10% of the adult's ideal weight. At the high end you are making something for someone whose ideal weight is 350lbs?? Maybe you want to double check that. I will let other posters answer you question about batting as I have never made one and the tutorial I linked to doesn't mention using batting either. But someone who has actually made one may know better.

    https://www.mamasmiles.com/sewing-tu...nsory-blanket/

  4. #4
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Old denim jeans....make sure you use proper denim and not the weird stretchy lightweight stuff they have in a lot of fashion jeans theses days. Good, regular denim from blokes jeans will definately give you the weight you are after. I was suprised just how heavy the denim quilt I made for my grandson turned out.

  5. #5
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I made a quilt that weighed 11 pounds and it was HEAVY as a quilt. I can not imagine how you would handle/ quilt a large quilt that weighed that much.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

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    Just noting that my 3yo weighs around 35lb and she is HEAVY to carry for short distances. I'm not sure any normal quilt battings would do really well in a quilt that weighed that much. I figure the weight would just flatten anything you put in it. I'm also not sure what that would do to a flannel backing, as flannel tends to be a little stretchy, in my experience.

    A denim top and backing would be pretty heavy together, but I have no idea how you would quilt a monster like that. Perhaps that would get you the weight you wanted though?

  7. #7
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    a more densely quilted quilt will be heavy too. I bought one and love it but it is heavy. not 35 lbs though I bet.

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    It is based off of the sensory blankets. The ones I read said 10% of body weight plus 3lbs for adults. Heís 300lbs. So the blanket would be around 33lbs. I said 35lbs just to sort of round up. I would prefer not to use actual weights/pellets as he doesnít like the way those weighted blankets feel. The shifting from the beads I mean - he likes the weight.
    Last edited by KEwer1992; 06-12-2018 at 12:51 PM.

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    You could use the pockets to hold the weights.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    A quilt weighing that much would be very hard on a regular washer and dryer. Would be a lot heavier wet.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    A quilt weighing that much would be very hard on a regular washer and dryer. Would be a lot heavier wet.
    Yes it would. Weíd probably have to take it to a laundromat or dry cleaner.

  12. #12
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    that is a very heavy blanket. my DIL wants a weighted blanket and I've suggested that she use the queen size t-shirt quilt I made my son to see if it's heavy enough first. Also, if you double bat it will add weight, especially to a t-shirt or denim quilt.

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    Quilters Dream makes a heavier weight batting that might work. Or use a double layer?

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    I once implied to a long arm quilter that when my top was finished I wanted it to be "puffy". She put a double layer of batting in it!! This was a quilt made for a raffle (Lady of the Lake) and was so darn heavy, it was hard to carry or display. Would have worked for someone in Alaska...but not Missouri. I felt that it was ruined.

  15. #15
    Senior Member jokir44's Avatar
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    Think about making your quilt go all the way to the floor. I made a king size like that and it is really heavy. I didn't weigh it but I know it is significantly heavier than ones I use with a bedskirt. He would need the extra length on the sides to stay covered up anyway. I have to take it to a laundromat, takes forever to dry. You might consider just piling on quilts and blankets to get to the weight most comfortable and make a big duvet for the stack. Eliminates the laundry problem and most of the time only the cover will need a wash. If you actually made a 35 pound quilt that would be so hard to move around to put it together and can't imagine try to quilt on a DSM at all. Just making the bed would be a workout.
    Last edited by jokir44; 06-13-2018 at 04:49 AM.

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    I also think that making several "heavier" quilts and stacking/piling them on would work better than one really heavy one.

    You could maybe attach ties to the edges of the quilts so that they would not slide apart.

    A 35 pound quilt would be a monster to try to wash.

    You said this person weighed around 300 pounds - how tall is this person?

    What size mattress does this person use?

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    My winter quilt is pieced flannel and it is flannel backed. The batting is Warm & Natural. I do not know the weight, but it is definitely heavy and warm. The heaviest quilt that I have ever used was my grandmother’s polyester double knit quilt.

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    If you must use a flannel backing, line it with a sheet or prewashed muslin. This way the flannel backing will not wear/weaken from whatever you are using for your weight. Also, you truly wonít need to make that blanket that heavy. I donít know how you would feed that blanket through your machine.
    Look up proper instructions to make these weighted blankets. What are you planning on using for your weight?
    As I make many of these blankets, I would suggest poly beads for the weights. Your blanket would be able to be washed in the tub and set outside to dry in the sun.
    Good Luck with this project.
    Last edited by Chris G; 06-13-2018 at 06:14 AM. Reason: Additional info

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    If you want a heavy quilt, try cutting up old blue jeans for the top. There is a video on the net on how to cut denim circles, place squares of batt and flannel in the center of the circles and fold in the circles edges to form fake cathedral window effect.
    I made this type of quilt with the denim circles and can give you the scoop on it:

    The denim is very heavy. I wanted a queen size quilt, but ended up with a much smaller quilt because of the weight. In the end, even though the quilt was heavy, I didn't find it very warm (and I get warm easily). What I did find, however, was that it was so heavy, it was hard to move under it. I didn't use any batting in the circles.
    The bigger the quilt gets the harder it is to sew together, you will kill your shoulders and arms and need lots of lineament and pain killers by the time you are through (or at least I did)
    Make sure you have a lot of either leather or denim sewing needles before you start, because you will break many of them before you are finished

    Would I ever make one of these again? Probably not, at least not a circle one for the fake cathedral window quilt, although it is a great looking quilt. I may try one with using squares, because it would only need straight seams, as apposed to the curved sewing around the circles to hold it down.

  20. #20
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I just weighed one of my heaviest oversized king quilts and it came in at around 12 pounds. I agree with the others who suggested making several quilts and stacking them. I don't know how you would even be able to quilt something that's equivalent to the thickness of 3 "normal" quilts, and I don't think ties would be strong enough to hold it together.

  21. #21
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    I made a weighted quilt for my hubby. It was the width of his side of the bed plus a bit more to hang down his sides. Problem is it will slide off him if it gets too far over and if it is too far towards the middle it's like a wall and I have minimal space on the bed. ): I used the beads in small pockets so there wasn't a whole lot of sliding bead issues. I Made the quilt out of his old shirts. It's about 20 pounds and plenty heavy for him. He weighs about 230 so I did not follow the exact guidelines for weight. He absolutely loves it! I can see how if you were doing a queen size quilt you would need 35 pounds. His is more twin size.
    I don't think you would get the same feeling if you just used heavy fabric and not the beads. The beads allow the quilt to form around a body and not have air gaps where a heavy fabric will give the weight but just lay flat over you without being cozy and comforting. Good Luck!

  22. #22
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I made my hubby a T shirt quilt using demin for sashings and border and backing...between the Iron on pellon interfacing so t shirt material didn't stretch, batting etc...it was heavy and he used it once and it's folded up in the closet taking up space now for 7 yrs...never again.. I can't imagine laying under 35 lbs ever...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jokir44 View Post
    Think about making your quilt go all the way to the floor. I made a king size like that and it is really heavy. I didn't weigh it but I know it is significantly heavier than ones I use with a bedskirt. He would need the extra length on the sides to stay covered up anyway. I have to take it to a laundromat, takes forever to dry. You might consider just piling on quilts and blankets to get to the weight most comfortable and make a big duvet for the stack. Eliminates the laundry problem and most of the time only the cover will need a wash. If you actually made a 35 pound quilt that would be so hard to move around to put it together and can't imagine try to quilt on a DSM at all. Just making the bed would be a workout.
    This is what I thought also, have 3-4 quilts and cover with a duvet cover use buttons to close, denim could make it weigh more. Easy to open and remove to wash.This would do away with the noise the pellets make.

  24. #24
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    Is there a reason why he said 35 lbs.? I also like the idea of several quilts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KEwer1992 View Post
    Yes it would. We’d probably have to take it to a laundromat or dry cleaner.
    How about making the top and backing more like a duvet cover so the heavier middle doesn't need washing as much?
    Sally

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