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Thread: Help me understand

  1. #1
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    Help me understand

    There was an older lady at our quilting group yesterday. She said we should make our bordersall one really long piece, enough to do all four sides of quilt. Then sub cut this to fit our sides. She claims there is less waste
    True4uca

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    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    Some people have their own way of thinking. I measure the center of the quilt, cut the two short sides to that length, then re-measure the center with the borders, cut the two long sides to that length.

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    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    What don't you understand?
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    I do it the way Barb does it. Sometimes our tops get stretched a little and if we are not careful we will get wavy borders.

    I believe Bonnie over at Quiltville explains how to do this.

    I will check some websites and get back to you.

  5. #5
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I do similar to pt quilts, except I do my sides first, then the top and bottom. I suppose you could piece one long piece and then cut off what you need, that is what it sounds like the lady at your quilting meeting meant.

    I usually just cut strips and sew together some for the lengths, and some for the top and bottom. I do usually have some leftover, but I cut it up into squares for my scrapboxes, or piece it into the fabric for the back of the quilt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patchsamkim View Post
    I do similar to pt quilts, except I do my sides first, then the top and bottom. I suppose you could piece one long piece and then cut off what you need, that is what it sounds like the lady at your quilting meeting meant.

    I usually just cut strips and sew together some for the lengths, and some for the top and bottom. I do usually have some leftover, but I cut it up into squares for my scrapboxes, or piece it into the fabric for the back of the quilt.
    Yes, this is the way I do it also. The light just came on.LOL. I think doing it her way I would just have one longer scrap left. Maybe?
    True4uca

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    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    I hate working with really long strips of fabric. I've found some of the patterns on Moda Bakeshop giving instruction to sew all the long strips together then cutting them apart. Some might not mind, but that is definitely not for me! I generally buy enough yardage to cut the borders lengthwise. That's plenty long enough for me. There is no waste for me. I just use the leftovers on something else.

  9. #9
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    I like to have one piece borders as well. I measure the center of the quilt the long way and cut the pieces on the lengthwise grain and sew them on. Then I measure the shot sides. I learned to do this many years ago -- the fabric does not have to be as long when you do it this way. I know the short sides may be a bit stretchier but if I starch enough it is not a problem and the stitching will hold it.

    Even if I don't have enough fabric to do the full length of the border in one piece, I always cut my borders parallel to the selvage since that direction is the least stretchy.
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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I have been trying the frame border and binding and I really like it. I don't like bindings and this method eliminates the binding, sort of. It's really a wide binding that is the border too. Hard to explain as I modified the method to suit me. The method is in the book: Just Around the Corner by Kari Carr
    Got fabric?

  11. #11
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    One long piece, long enough to do all 4 sides, would be a very long piece of fabric indeed when you're talking about a bed quilt. For a 100" square quilt, this would be about 12 yards of fabric! And if your border is only 5" wide, what would you do with the remaining 12 yards by 35"? I think she was not explaining herself very well, because this is not a way to save fabric!

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    Now that I am one of the "older" quilters, I say, "DO IT WHATEVER WAY IS EASIEST FOR YOU". We may have more experience but we are not you
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    Sometimes I do cut my long borders pieces first. The exception is when the fabric has a noticeable directional print. In that case I decide if it is more important for the pattern to all go in one direction or not. This means occasionally cutting on the crosswise instead of all on the lengthwise of the fabric.

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    Thank you ,thank you

    The quiltville site is now in my favorites. Hated taking 3 measurements & averaging thing. Her way makes so much more sense.
    True4uca

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    I think she may have meant to sew all the lengths together - like we do for continuous binding - and then cut off the amounts needed - so that the seams would hit 'wherever' -

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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I think she may have meant to sew all the lengths together - like we do for continuous binding - and then cut off the amounts needed - so that the seams would hit 'wherever' -
    You know I think you are so right.
    True4uca

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    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by true4uca View Post
    There was an older lady at our quilting group yesterday. She said we should make our bordersall one really long piece, enough to do all four sides of quilt. Then sub cut this to fit our sides. She claims there is less waste

    She wants you to buy a piece of border fabric 12 yards long so you can cut 4" along one side? Less waste?

    She's not telling you something!
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    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    One long piece, long enough to do all 4 sides, would be a very long piece of fabric indeed when you're talking about a bed quilt. For a 100" square quilt, this would be about 12 yards of fabric! And if your border is only 5" wide, what would you do with the remaining 12 yards by 35"? I think she was not explaining herself very well, because this is not a way to save fabric!
    .
    LOL, that was my reaction. She's leaving part of the story out!
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  19. #19
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by true4uca View Post
    There was an older lady at our quilting group yesterday. She said we should make our bordersall one really long piece, enough to do all four sides of quilt. Then sub cut this to fit our sides. She claims there is less waste
    The part I don't get is "waste." It's not like you're cutting out a dress and want to use the least amount of fabric possible. Fabric left from making a quilt isn't waste. It's scrap starters for another quilt.

  20. #20
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
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    I agree with Katier85. That's how I do mine. Seems to work for me.

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    At first I thought it wasteful. But I learned that cutting the border, sides lengths first, lengthwise of the fabric gives the border material more strength. After all it has to hold many pieced sections together! then the shorter width pieces can be cut from the lengthwise fabric. They of course are shorter. Depending on the width of the border there is some material left and that is ok. I learned this from Japanese Quilt Inspirations. For the quilt I chose to make I cut the borders of each block the same way, out of lengthwise fabric. There were many boxes around beautiful prints. I just got the quilt back from the LAQ and am hand sewing the binding to the back and enjoying the quilt.This was a new approach for me and I had to revise my thinking, but I am happy with the results.
    Last edited by mcar; 09-02-2012 at 03:13 AM.

  22. #22
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts View Post
    Some people have their own way of thinking. I measure the center of the quilt, cut the two short sides to that length, then re-measure the center with the borders, cut the two long sides to that length.
    This is generally how I do it, especially if a lot of bias edges are involved in the body of the quilt.

  23. #23
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I usually back up a few steps when I hear "You should always...." or "You should never...."

  24. #24
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    I always do mine like the quiltville tute. I never use a measuring tape because they slip and are just not as accurate as laying the fabric on the quilttop through the center, or anywhere but at the very edge. Then I pin ends first, then center, then maybe one in each section if it is the lengthwise strip I am sewing. And I always put the side strips first. I think the "older" lady just didn't put her phrase into words very well; not sure what she meant. If I have enough fabric I use the lengthwise cut of fabric so I don't have to seam, otherwise I do the 45 degree seam.

  25. #25
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    Often the instructions say to piece the border using a diagonal seam, like you would when piecing binding. There is quite a bit of waste when doing it this way rather than a ''straight across ' seam. The wider the border the more waste there would be.
    If you cut from the length of the fabric so as not to have a seam you would save fabric. This is my understanding of what she might have been talking about.

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