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Thread: Help for a Newbie

  1. #26
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    I'm leaning towards the Brother. It has a lot of features. I just need to be sure I have the extra money AND a good reason to tell the DH.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Patti25314's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkyrue01 View Post
    They do have a new machine that is under $400... a Bernette 15. Does anyone know anything about it?
    I currently do sew-ins on new machines coming into our shop, and I did a Bernette 12 the other day. It is a doll of a machine. I was impressed with the quality for the $. I'm not sure I've seen a 15, but it is probably like a 12 with a few more stitches. I think I'd invest money into servicing your current machine by a Singer expert. Then save up for a Bernina. It really is great to have a back-up machine.

  3. #28
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    I have a Mennonite store a half hour away. They do ALL kinds of sewing machines. He sells Bernina, but repairs anything, including treadle machines, and is very reasonable. (About $35 to service my Bernina) Ask around for Mennonite or Amish communities. If they are there, they will have their own store.

  4. #29
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    I'd say keep looking for a used machine. You can't beat the Singer 401A or a 301. They are all metal, sew like crazy, and the 401 A has many bells and whistles and loads of pretty stitches. It is easy to set and will give you good service. I did have to replace my foot pedal as I wore the original out. It works better than my Viking computerized machine.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    OK...you can pick up a 1/4" foot if you feel you need it at Walmart for less than $10, just had one in my hand the other day. You really don't need a seam guide it gets more in the way than helps, the best suggestion I have heard for a good seam guide has been here on the board, measure from your needle over 1/4" and stitch down either a 1/2" stack of the tiny post-its or lay down a strip of command tape. soooooooooooooo much better
    Love the Command tape idea. Tried it last week and it is the best thing so far to me!!!

  6. #31
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    I bought a small Bernette for travel and am sorry I did. They are not made by Bernina and are cheap piece of plastic. I agree with everything Prism said. I am most familiar with Janome because that's the only local dealer we have. I know several friends who bought the Janome Gem basically for a travel/workshop , machine, but I'm not sure it has the features you're looking for. The Janome 3160 is a great machine for new quilters. I started out with the Heart Truth machine and have traded up each year until now I have the 6600 and love it!

    If you are limited in budget, I would definitely ask the dealer if they have a nice machine that has been traded in. I have many quilting friends who "have" to have the latest model and will trade almost every other year if not every year to get the latest thing out there.

    Good Luck and welcome to Quilting!
    Karen in Kentucky

  7. #32
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkyrue01 View Post
    The Bernina dealer does not have any used in my price range. What are your thoughts on buying a used one from Ebay?
    I think if you can find a Bernina 830 record, which is a mechanical rather than computerized machine, on Ebay it would be in your price range. They have all the needed features and are very sturdy, they will sew for decades with good results. I know this as I have been sewing on one since 1974. It still runs a as if it was new. Repairs over the time I have had it, well for the first twenty years I sewed so much on it I wore the bushings down to a nub and I have had to replace the foot pedal. I don't sew on it as much now as it is my backup to my Bernina 440 so it is in semi retirement. I still use it when I am teaching my friends daughter to sew. So look on Ebay and I think you will do better than with a low end box store machine. One of the advantages of a mechanical is you do not need to go to a Bernina dealer to have it serviced. Any sewing machine repair place will do it on a non computerized machine.
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  8. #33
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    Do you have a manual that came with the machine. Usually they have a replacement parts listed. Maybe buying a foot pedal and a walking foot (a walking foot keeps the fabric edges even). I have had a Kenmore machine forever. The only thing I have done is a cleaning ($69.00) and bought a walking foot. The Kenmore machines are sold by Sears. Also Overstock.com has some pretty inexpensive machines that you may want to look at.

  9. #34
    Member norwalkgma's Avatar
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    Have 2 old machines (one a treadle) and wanted a new machine. Bought a Brother from WalMart - has needle up/down, speed control - good selection of fancy stitches and needle positions. Have completed a dozen quilts on it with no problems. Get it serviced every 18 mo or so and am happy with purchase. Also came with CD instructions as well as manual. Ck them out.

  10. #35
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Try this link(funny but informative):- www.evidently.org/2007/02too-much-information/

  11. #36
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I got a "page not found" with that link.

  12. #37
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    I just bought my granddaughter a Brother macine (10 st, has darning/quilting foot) for 63.00 & free shipping. She loves it! Easy to use (Emmali is 14, but has learning disorders)...I was worried about the bobbin area, as it has to be kept clean...but her mom says she will check and clean it for Em. I have several machines, well, ok six or seven, if you don't count the serger, longarm or 12 needle embroidery machine, lol. I like the Brother SE270D (it's a little embroidery/sewing machine I got at walmart ...which is were I ordered Em's machine). I use the Brother mainly for piecing now...love the thread cutter, what a time saver. I have a Singer 2662 and got it in 2006...it's got a nice zigzag stitch that will look like a satin stitch. I also have a Futura CE150 (sewing/embroidery) that is used mostly for sewing, and three old Singers...one is a treddle. It was cheaper for me to buy Em a new machine and have it sent to her, than it would have cost to send her one of mine.
    If your singer is pulling (I'm guessing it's puckering the fabric...or is it that you have to pull the fabric through? Either way...get it cleaned, or clean it yourself. The CE150 is about 500.00 right now...so probably more than you want to pay..I'd look at the Brother machines for under 300.00... they will cost more if you buy from a dealer. Walmart has some good machines for around that price, and some for a lot less.
    Marge

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkyrue01 View Post
    I'm not sure that I am posting this in the right place. I'm new here.

    I'm new to quilting and I have an older, inexpensive model Singer sewing machine, that I just don't think is cutting it. I have major problems getting accurate seam allowances because of pulling. Plus my foot pedal has no finesse. It's either all or nothing. Could anyone recommend a good beginner sewing machine I can use for accurate piecing, ditch quilting, and possibly some free motion quilting in the future? I really appreciate it!
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  13. #38
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    Please don't buy a cheapie from WM or anywhere else. Stick with a vintage all metal machine or go with the Janome. The footplate shouldn't be a problem. I've had Janomes for the last 20 years and have never changed a footplate out. I've got an old Kenmore, an old Morse, a few Singer treadles, a 1970s Singer, a Janome 10001 and a Janome 9000. I bought a little Brother machine @ WM to carry to classes. It had the needle up/down and the automatic thread cutter. A good bargain I thought, until I tried to sew on it. The harp area was so small, I would have lucky to fit a quilted placemat under it! I think you will be VERY happy with the Janome or a vintage machine. JMHO!

  14. #39
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    Maybe you could sew some other items to help pay for your Machine... Pillow Cases, Diaper bags, Messenger Bags, Tote Bags, Gift bags...most of those I mentioned are straight seams and zig zag raw edges. I got some drapery/upholstery samples at a local Thrift shop and these made some great little bags about 10 to 12 inches square or Rectangle with Drawstrings in top casing. Sold them at a Craft/ Rummage sale at Church for $2.00 each. Also made some larger bags to put personal items in for local Woman's Shelter ( comb, toothbrush and paste, deodorant and small bar of soap). You could offer to do mending for ladies and gents that go to local Senior Center (low cost), many can't see good enough or don't have sewing machines... Hemming dresses, slacks, etc...or a nursing home might have need for some one to do mending and get paid for it.... its a thought..... I have a Husky 140 by Viking, that I have had for some time and it does well for what I need it for.... plus it had no problem sewing the Duck fabric for Corn Hole Bags- 32 the first time.. I used a needle for Denim fabrics... and it worked just fine... I agree with others on this post that you need to sit down at a machine with the fabric you like to use and give them all a Test run... I just bought two sewing machines at a Estate Auction for $3.00 - one is a older Kenmore by Sears and Roebuck and the other is a Domestic #1630 sold by the Standard Sewing Equipment Company from Cleveland, Ohio. The Amish lady got the older Singer that has a outside belt so they can hook it up to a treadle .... and I also have a Singer that hubby got at another Auction that is brand new in the box for $30. The two older machines are metal... and the lady that had them used them all the time.
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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkyrue01 View Post
    Well, I looked into the Brother PC-420 PRW and the Janome HD1000. I like both but the Brother is at the very top of my budget and I would want a couple of extra accessories to add to it. I really like the Janome, but it does not have an option to change the needle plate to a straight stitch plate. I have read that when straight sewing if you are using a zigzag plate that the wide opening can draw fabric down into this. I was wondering if anyone has any opinions on this.
    I had an old Janome that did not have the switch plate option (don't know if you can buy one separately), but it always ate the beginning of a seam- needed to use a scrap to start. My new Janome has an auto change plate, so much nicer than having to change plates all the time. Something to dream of when times get better.

    Brenda

  16. #41
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    I have purchased several machines from ebay. There are dealers on ebay that use the machines to teach classes and then sell at a deep discount.

  17. #42
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    i went to sears about 6 years ago and bought a kenmore on sale for around 200. and have been using it to make plenty of quilts since then, it alldepends on how much you want to spend and what you need it for

  18. #43
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    I think it really depends on your budget. I have a Janome 1600P C, a great straight stitch workhorse of a machine, but far from cheap. My guess is that you would do better going to garage sales, where you can often get good reliable machines for under $50.

  19. #44
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    If I was going to buy a new sewing machine, I would get the Singer 160th Anniversary Edition. It looks very nice, and may be worth lots of money some day. Only $299 and free shipping!
    http://www.amazon.com/SINGER-160-Ann...rds=singer+160

  20. #45
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    Well, I've decided to keep my old machine and make the best of it. It looks like we really don't have any extra money, so my budget of $400 has gone down to maybe $50. Ha! I think I'll try a generic 1/4" foot and darning foot and see what I can do. Thanks for all your help and I'll keep your tips in mind in the future.

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