Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 35 of 35

Thread: Help

  1. #26
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,886
    Blog Entries
    1
    Sorry, I wasn't completely clear.

    My directions for spray starching were for not taking the entire quilt sandwich apart. If the puckering isn't too extensive, I would probably take out the stitching in one area and try the spray starch approach in that area to see if I could then re-stitch it without puckering. It seems to me it might be possible to take some of the excess fabric out with steaming, and then the starch would help keep the backing from re-puckering when you repair that area.

    Incidentally, I didn't realize there was a second page to this thread until after I posted. I prefer cotton battings, so didn't realize spray basting doesn't work as well with poly battings. The spray I use is from JoAnn Fabrics and made especially for quilt basting. This has never gummed up my sewing machine needle.

    Mary

  2. #27
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,886
    Blog Entries
    1


    If you are taking the quilt sandwich apart, you could certainly spray starch the backing fabric. It would take several layers to get it stiff enough, though, and you have to be careful to let the spray starch absorb each time before ironing. It's much faster and a lot less work to use the "painting" method I described. The fabric doesn't need to be completely dry before taking it out of the dryer to iron; just dry enough so your iron doesn't get gummed up with lots of starch.

    Basically, you want the backing fabric to be very stiff before layering the sandwich. In my experience, one or two layers of spray starch won't be enough; I would guess it would take four layers or so.

    If taking the quilt sandwich apart, I would also starch the top. For that, I would definitely use spray starch. Even just one layer would help. The top doesn't have to be as stiff as the backing fabric because you can see puckers coming. I would probably spray starch once from the back, and then give the top an extra spray starch from the top.

    Mary

  3. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    SW NE
    Posts
    20
    My quilting teacher (who also judges at our county fair) always has me take straight pins and pin all the way when I stitch in the ditch as it keeps it from puckering. I have found that it really helps me from getting those puckers on the back of the quilt. Good luck in fixing your quilt. It is very nice.
    Judy

  4. #29
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    6,764
    It seems that this pucker is a matter of not enough pinning or basting, as was indicated by other posters. I have just been through the same thing. When I ripped the one seam that had the pucker, laid the quilt flat and repositioned the pins (very close together), and restitched letting the walking foot do it's thing, it worked out. The next quilt, I needle-and-thread basted close together and got no puckers.

  5. #30
    Suz
    Suz is offline
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,316
    The pink fabric is very pretty and complements the quilt top.

    Perhaps next time you could use a printed fabric which would be more forgiving and the puckers would not be so obvious.

    Just a thought. Suz

  6. #31
    kd124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Camas, Washington
    Posts
    2,597
    I have also had this problem. I ripped out a small area as suggested by others and pinned before resewing. I had tried using less pins and that is how I got the puckers. Usually I pin, pin, pin when I am not using the machine on a frame. I normally place my pins about 3 fingers apart.
    Good luck and they are small enough that they should work out just fine.

  7. #32
    Super Member mimisharon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Jacksonville, North Carolina
    Posts
    6,014
    Carol,
    Did you prewash your fabric? You might find, if you temp bind, wash, and line dry.....it works itself out. Oh, the puckers that are obvious to you, you'll likely want to try to fix, but I would surely do a wash and dry before I leap into having the ripit fever! The quilt is just beautiful, you've done a wonderful job.

    ONE thing I think you need to tell yourself, "Quilting is fun NOT Perfection", repeat as needed to be convinced. It took me awhile to learn to loosen up and enjoy the finished look and not concentrate on any imperfections. Most that see the quilts never see imperfections, they see the love that built it!

    Hugs,
    Sharon

  8. #33
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,387
    Thank you all for all the wonderful suggestions.

    I have taken out the puckers but I have not decided whether I'll take out all the quilting and start again or just try to stitch the areas that I've ripped out.

    I'm leaning toward trying to restitch and starch.

    Thank you all for your encouragement!!!

  9. #34
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    6,764
    Now that your puckers are ripped out, pin the dickens out of them and stitch slowly. Your walking foot will probably take care of it.

    I don't understand the concept of starching. I would think that the ironing will flatten or matt the batting. I've starched fabric, but never once the quilt is assembled. I suppose that's what I like about this board. Somewhere, somehow, someone has done something that has worked. :lol:

  10. #35
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    17,211
    Before i give my suggestion, I will admit to two things: being somewhat new to quilting, and I confess I am a nut about what other people will think, so I am not sure I could do this suggestion myself. I'd probably rip till the cows came home...thus, quiltncrazy, lol!!!!!!!
    If you are really unhappy with the back, bc the front is very pretty, what if you covered the back with another back, and tied it instead of machining. If you don't want ties on front, just do lots of ties and bury in the batting. The front is already quilted. I don't know if this would make your quilt stiff or heavy.
    I think you probably need a (((hug)) for all that work.
    I hope you can do something that makes you happy with it. C

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.