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Thread: Hey ummm...need a anwser

  1. #1

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    Ok im trying to make my first ragedy quilt and between the front and the back do i put anything in the middle of between the two materials ? or do I put stuffing i hardly sew so i dont know.

  2. #2
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    If you are using cotton fabrics, you can put a piece of batting between your squares, cut your batting at least 1 in smaller than your squares and use a 1/2" seam and clip to seam. You can also use a piece of flannel in the middle. Some people, when making a rag quilt out of flannel fabrics don't put any batting in it because it will be warm enough. I made a flannel one, and used warm and natural batting in the middle, used 1/2 in seams. Sandwich your batting, centered between your squares, stitch an x across.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim's Gem
    If you are using cotton fabrics, you can put a piece of batting between your squares, cut your batting at least 1 in smaller than your squares and use a 1/2" seam and clip to seam. You can also use a piece of flannel in the middle. Some people, when making a rag quilt out of flannel fabrics don't put any batting in it because it will be warm enough. I made a flannel one, and used warm and natural batting in the middle, used 1/2 in seams. Sandwich your batting, centered between your squares, stitch an x across.
    Oh ok thank you very much !!!!!!!!!

  4. #4
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    Here you go---just in case you need them. I typed them up awhile ago. :D

    1. Buy your flannel—2 colors, or more. Maybe about 7 yards all together—it’s hard to know how much to get. One pattern says 6.25 yards for a twin size. I’d hate for there not to be enough for the size you want, then have the store not have more of your color. I usually buy 1-3 yards of several colors that match, then I have enough to play around with them. It sounds like a lot, but remember it’s the back too.

    2. Also buy some Warm and Natural cotton batting—about 3 yards because it’s extra long? (I’m not good at yardage—but that one you can get more of if you need to.)

    3. There are many options as to square size. You can cut your flannel into 6 inch, 7 inch, 8 inch squares. The bigger they are, the faster it’ll go together, but the smaller the squares, the more interesting your pattern will be. I always cut the flannel into 7 inch squares. If you want, you can cut any scrap pieces into rectangles 7 x 4 inch pieces. Two rectangles sewn together will equal one square. They add even more fun to the finished product!

    4. Cut the batting into 5 ¾” squares. For rectangles, the batting needs to be 5 ¾ x 2 ¾ inches.

    5. Choose 2 flannel squares of the same color and 1 batting square. Layer the squares of batting between the 2 quilt squares so the right sides of the flannel are facing the out. (let me know if you need a picture) Then sew each square from corner to corner—so there’s an X across the square. I eye it up, but you may want to draw on a line to follow. Use a continuous seam to sew these together, first one line, then the other. Are you familiar with the continuous seam? It’s so easy, and makes things so much faster, AND it saves on thread!

    6. For any rectangle pieces, I just sew a wavy line from the middle of one short side to the middle of the opposite side.

    7. Complete every square and rectangle in this way.

    8. Lay out the squares in the pattern you like. Take a picture if you have a digital camera.

    9. Pick up each row by starting at one end and stacking each square under the previous one. Label each pile with its row number. Pin the row number on the top square.

    10. Sew all the rows together, using a ½ seam. Make sure all seams are on the same side.

    11. Sew each row to the next, pinning at every seam so they match perfectly. Lock the seams—meaning have one folded to each side as they are sewn together. Make sure all seams are on the same side. (I always goof at least once and have to rip a row apart.) It pays to double check.

    12. Now sew around the whole quilt using a ½ seam.

    13. Once the whole quilt is together, you need to rag it. I place the quilt, folded at a seam facing toward me, on the ironing board, and clip almost to the seam—all the way from one end to the other—about ¼- ½ inch apart. The directions say to snip right to the seam, but I have never gotten that close. Now and then, you will cut through the seam. Just stick it under your sewing machine and repair it by sewing over that area again. It happens.

    14. Once ever seam is clipped, clip around the whole outside.

    15. Now, shake your beautiful creation outside to get some of the lint off.

    16. Most directions say to wash the quilt now, but I have found it works to just spray the front well with water, and wet the back a bit too. You decide what you’d like to do.

    17. Shake the quilt outside again. Then put it in the dryer. The dryer will be what makes the seams rag up.

    18. Now and then clean your lint filter and even shake the quilt outside again.

    19. Smile, you’re done. 

  5. #5
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I had some dollar fabric from wallmart i used just like batting... works :D

  6. #6
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    Thanks Karla -- I printed them out!!

  7. #7
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    Well, it may be too late cause I just read this. However, I love to make raggety quilts. I put a layer of osnaberg between the layers. When you "rag" the quilt, it makes the ragging really "curly" and nice. I made my first two before I heard about it and it makes a huge difference.

    margie

  8. #8

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    I have made quite a few of these quilts and I use cotton for the outside of the quilt and then if I want a light weight cozy quilt to snuggle with I use flannel for the inside. If I want a wall hanging or something more decorative then I used batting. Good Luck
    Pris

  9. #9
    ccbear66's Avatar
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    I use cotton for the outside and flannel for the inside. I cut all 3 squares the same then rag. here is a pic of one that I made for my Grandmother last year.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    racnquilter's Avatar
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    ccbear...very pretty....grandmother and quilt both!!

  11. #11
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    It is 100% cotton fabric with the look of homesprun. It comes in natural, white and some colors. Lately, I have been having trouble finding it in white. I only use the white or natural...and the natural(sort of oatmeal colored) works even with white. I buy it at Joann's with a coupon, usually by the bolt, but most purchase it by the yard. I have made so many flannel raggety quilts and this just gives the edges such a beautiful, puffy look.

    I have made some that have embroidered blocks so that the quilt "tells a story". I will try to see if I have some pics and put on for you so you can see the edges. Hope this answers your question.

    Margie

  12. #12
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    HOMESPUN...sorry typo....look of HOMESPUN. BTW, if you goggle it you can buy online too.

    Margie

  13. #13
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    Loretta, Giving this another try....have tried to send pics a few times and having problems. Quilt was for graduation. On out borders were squares for graduate and each of her family members and each of her pets. Inner squares were squares with "advice for living life". I hope you can see how the osnaberg "puffs' up the edges of the squares. Margie

  14. #14
    Senior Member judithb's Avatar
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    When I am quillting a rag quilt for someome that doesn't live in a very cold climate I use batting, but when I make one for someont that lives in a warm climate I just use cotton on one side and flannel on the other.
    I made 6 this fall for Christmas gifts for the great grand children and most were all flannel 'cause they live in cold country!
    Judith

  15. #15
    Super Member nanabirdmo's Avatar
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    i have so many scraps of batting that i use it up making rag quilts. i can't stand to throw it away. i have even been known to mix different types and haven't noticed anything bad happening. of course my rag quilts are the ones that get the most use and i do mean use. they are used inside and out and i usually have one in the car in the winter just in case. there are no quilt police here so have fun and experiment.

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