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Hey ummm...need a anwser

Hey ummm...need a anwser

Old 11-22-2008, 05:10 PM
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Ok im trying to make my first ragedy quilt and between the front and the back do i put anything in the middle of between the two materials ? or do I put stuffing i hardly sew so i dont know.
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Old 11-22-2008, 05:13 PM
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If you are using cotton fabrics, you can put a piece of batting between your squares, cut your batting at least 1 in smaller than your squares and use a 1/2" seam and clip to seam. You can also use a piece of flannel in the middle. Some people, when making a rag quilt out of flannel fabrics don't put any batting in it because it will be warm enough. I made a flannel one, and used warm and natural batting in the middle, used 1/2 in seams. Sandwich your batting, centered between your squares, stitch an x across.
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Old 11-22-2008, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim's Gem
If you are using cotton fabrics, you can put a piece of batting between your squares, cut your batting at least 1 in smaller than your squares and use a 1/2" seam and clip to seam. You can also use a piece of flannel in the middle. Some people, when making a rag quilt out of flannel fabrics don't put any batting in it because it will be warm enough. I made a flannel one, and used warm and natural batting in the middle, used 1/2 in seams. Sandwich your batting, centered between your squares, stitch an x across.
Oh ok thank you very much !!!!!!!!!
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Old 11-22-2008, 05:26 PM
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Here you go---just in case you need them. I typed them up awhile ago. :D

1. Buy your flannel—2 colors, or more. Maybe about 7 yards all together—it’s hard to know how much to get. One pattern says 6.25 yards for a twin size. I’d hate for there not to be enough for the size you want, then have the store not have more of your color. I usually buy 1-3 yards of several colors that match, then I have enough to play around with them. It sounds like a lot, but remember it’s the back too.

2. Also buy some Warm and Natural cotton batting—about 3 yards because it’s extra long? (I’m not good at yardage—but that one you can get more of if you need to.)

3. There are many options as to square size. You can cut your flannel into 6 inch, 7 inch, 8 inch squares. The bigger they are, the faster it’ll go together, but the smaller the squares, the more interesting your pattern will be. I always cut the flannel into 7 inch squares. If you want, you can cut any scrap pieces into rectangles 7 x 4 inch pieces. Two rectangles sewn together will equal one square. They add even more fun to the finished product!

4. Cut the batting into 5 ¾” squares. For rectangles, the batting needs to be 5 ¾ x 2 ¾ inches.

5. Choose 2 flannel squares of the same color and 1 batting square. Layer the squares of batting between the 2 quilt squares so the right sides of the flannel are facing the out. (let me know if you need a picture) Then sew each square from corner to corner—so there’s an X across the square. I eye it up, but you may want to draw on a line to follow. Use a continuous seam to sew these together, first one line, then the other. Are you familiar with the continuous seam? It’s so easy, and makes things so much faster, AND it saves on thread!

6. For any rectangle pieces, I just sew a wavy line from the middle of one short side to the middle of the opposite side.

7. Complete every square and rectangle in this way.

8. Lay out the squares in the pattern you like. Take a picture if you have a digital camera.

9. Pick up each row by starting at one end and stacking each square under the previous one. Label each pile with its row number. Pin the row number on the top square.

10. Sew all the rows together, using a ½ seam. Make sure all seams are on the same side.

11. Sew each row to the next, pinning at every seam so they match perfectly. Lock the seams—meaning have one folded to each side as they are sewn together. Make sure all seams are on the same side. (I always goof at least once and have to rip a row apart.) It pays to double check.

12. Now sew around the whole quilt using a ½ seam.

13. Once the whole quilt is together, you need to rag it. I place the quilt, folded at a seam facing toward me, on the ironing board, and clip almost to the seam—all the way from one end to the other—about ¼- ½ inch apart. The directions say to snip right to the seam, but I have never gotten that close. Now and then, you will cut through the seam. Just stick it under your sewing machine and repair it by sewing over that area again. It happens.

14. Once ever seam is clipped, clip around the whole outside.

15. Now, shake your beautiful creation outside to get some of the lint off.

16. Most directions say to wash the quilt now, but I have found it works to just spray the front well with water, and wet the back a bit too. You decide what you’d like to do.

17. Shake the quilt outside again. Then put it in the dryer. The dryer will be what makes the seams rag up.

18. Now and then clean your lint filter and even shake the quilt outside again.

19. Smile, you’re done. 
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Old 11-23-2008, 05:26 AM
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I had some dollar fabric from wallmart i used just like batting... works :D
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Old 11-23-2008, 03:17 PM
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Thanks Karla -- I printed them out!!
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Old 11-24-2008, 10:35 AM
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Well, it may be too late cause I just read this. However, I love to make raggety quilts. I put a layer of osnaberg between the layers. When you "rag" the quilt, it makes the ragging really "curly" and nice. I made my first two before I heard about it and it makes a huge difference.

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Old 11-24-2008, 11:02 AM
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I have made quite a few of these quilts and I use cotton for the outside of the quilt and then if I want a light weight cozy quilt to snuggle with I use flannel for the inside. If I want a wall hanging or something more decorative then I used batting. Good Luck
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Old 11-24-2008, 01:15 PM
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I use cotton for the outside and flannel for the inside. I cut all 3 squares the same then rag. here is a pic of one that I made for my Grandmother last year.
Attached Thumbnails attachment-34044.jpe  
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Old 11-25-2008, 10:56 AM
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ccbear...very pretty....grandmother and quilt both!!
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