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Thread: how do you stipple?

  1. #76

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    Is 80 the right size of sharps needles for stippling?

  2. #77
    Carla P's Avatar
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    That size should do just fine if you are using size 40, 50, or 60 thread. You could also use a 70 or 75 needle with the size 50 or 60 thread for smaller needle holes, but your quilting thread will be a little less visible. The visibility is a personal preference depending on your project.

    Clear as mud?

  3. #78

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    Excellently clear. Thank you. Were you able to see the downloadable photo of the quilt?

  4. #79
    Carla P's Avatar
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    No. All I am getting is an AOL page, but the pictures are "X" out & I can't get them to open. I hate it. Maybe I'll be able to catch the next time. :D

  5. #80
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandy Keating
    CARLA!!

    I agree with you wholeheartedly! I am terrified of messing up months of my patchwork, designing, etc. with messed-up quilting that I either:

    1. leave the quilt as a top
    2. do VERY basic hand-quilting (so I have a chance of finishing it some day
    3. tie the quilt (which makes some people feel the need to tell me that my finished product is not in fact a "real" quilt-- meanies!), or
    4. acutally mess it up trying to feed it through my machine!

    I would really love to try FMQ and other machine-quilting techniques, but I am so worried to mess something up, or have my Kenmore machine laughed at by the Pfaffers at my local quilt shop.

    *sigh* :shock:
    Mandy,

    Please, please, please: 1. Do not be afraid to try... Make a quilt sandwich with just plain muslin if you need to, but allow yourself the chance to at least try... It is a lot of fun; and 2. Do not be ashamed of your sewing machine or your sewing capabilities... I do not know of one single person born into this world with a Bernina under their arm, and not everyone owns one (including me). If we all owned one there would be no machines made by Kenmore, Brother, Singer, Elna, Viking, and so on and forth. Most people buy what they can, but "what you can" is a relative term, and not totally based on what you can financially afford. ("Can" includes- CAN find, CAN get this one with these features I want, CAN get this one because it is a super work horse, Can get this one because of portability, CAN get this one to fit in my sewing cabinet... Getting any of this?? :wink: ) If people are so shallow that they base their decisions about you based on your sewing machine name brand and age, they are SNOBS and do not deserve to have you waste your time on THEM! Now, no more shame in your game; it makes you doubt your skills and abilities and impedes your learning process. Be proud of yourself and accomplishments. A sewing machine is only a tool to help us reach our goal sooner. :D

  6. #81
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I agree Carla, I heard a few small remarks when I bought my machine at WM. It's a singer and it was a good price. Amore expensive brand may have more bells and whistles (that I probably wouldn't bother learning to use) but I don't think it would work any better. The reason I replaced my 28 yr old was because it was my birthday and I couldn't think of anything I really wanted. On my next BD I got a Singer embroidery machine and I love it too. I'm not sure but didn't Singer used to be the only machine? I've never seen another brand in the treadle style like the pioneers had. That's what I learned to sew on and still have it. Kenmore makes very good products, more money doesn't always mean better quality.

  7. #82
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Thank you, Kathy! :D My Grandmother helped support the family by making clothes and quilts on a Singer treadle that my Great-Grandmother had given to her which had been bought before the Depression. In 1972, for Christmas all of her kids pooled the money to buy her a new Singer with a cabinet, & it was the only other machine she ever owned. My Aunt still uses it to this day. 8) If it ain't broke... :lol: Now Kathy, if you are in the mood to pass out sewing machines for B-day gifts, I have one in July... :lol: I'm not a snob either. I already have a bell on my phone, so I don't need another, & I can whistle for my dogs, so I don't need that either... :lol:

  8. #83
    marieg's Avatar
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    I do a lot of free motion quilting. I to learned that stippling shouldn't cross over itself, but since I don't put my quilts in shows I don't worry too much about it. Stippling is pretty small, meandering is bigger. For the life of me I can't seem to follow a drawn on quilting pattern. A friend and long arm quilter told me to draw, doodle, scribble whatever you want to call it and that works well. I can do pine cones and pine boughs, write, leaves... This last year I wrote happy holidays continuosly in a border. The trick is practice a little bit everyday and move fast if you go slow it doesn't work. my .02 marieg

  9. #84
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Mandy, I recently took a machine quilting class at a shop that specializes in Bernina machines. The owner repeatedly asked me if I wanted to borrow 1 of their machines vs. bringing my own..NOOO...I took "Sally" (my 1970 something Singer) and proudly used her all day. Everyone else had to work with their Bernina's and a lot of them wasted a lot of time trying to figure out how to use them!

    Don't get me wrong, 1 of my goals is to someday own 1 of those nice Bernina's, but I just can't seem to justify it right now.

  10. #85
    marieg's Avatar
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    I agree Carla, I have owned two brands of machine Singer and Pfaff. I love old Singers and I like my new Pfaff. I have nothing against other machines its just what I like. Saying that I would probably never buy a Bernia. It's one of those people have shoved it down my throat and I'm stubborn. marieg

  11. #86
    Steve's Avatar
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    I got confused because the meandering style of stippling is so common. I thought that that was all there was, but then I read this:

    Simply defined, stippling refers to the quilting technique of sewing lines of stitching close together, approximately 1/16 to 1/8 inch apart. The most recognized stipple pattern (a non-pattern, really) is a meandering line that curves in and out, creating shapes that look like pieces from a jigsaw puzzle. To be authentic, it should be a continuous line, but since starting and stopping can be accomplished invisibly when you're hand quilting, no one will ever know.

    Other well-known quilting patterns like checkerboard, diamond, and chevron can be adapted for stippling quilt backgrounds. - From "Flawless Hand Quilting"

  12. #87
    Super Member sondray's Avatar
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    http://www.michelles-designs.com/stipplinginstructions.htm
    http://patchpieces.com/2001quiltingBOM.html
    http://www.quiltingassistant.com/stippling.html

    Patchpieces.com has free stipple patterns in Pdf.

  13. #88
    robbijmorris's Avatar
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    thanks for the info, everyone! i printed some instructions on stippling, and I may actually try it someday! Y'all have made it seem much less intimidating than it is.

    I really appreciate it! I'm kinda excited now!

    Robbi

  14. #89
    Super Member Harmony's Avatar
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    I've seen plastic stencils with the stippling pattern in different sizes. Google "quilting stencils" and you'll get some sites to look at stencils.

  15. #90
    Super Member blahel's Avatar
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    I also recently tried to do stippling which was way harder to do than it looked. i started off trying to meander and not cross over but in the end i ended up inventing a new thing..i call it scribbling and you can cross over lines! Now i am happy and maybe one day i will master stippling but for now i am happy to do scribbling!!

  16. #91
    Super Member Quilting Aggi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joy
    Correct me if I am wrong, but stippling is like corneli work on an iced cake... one continuous wriggly line.... but bigger curves....
    but at no time do you cross over a line.

  17. #92
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I bought a large stencil with stipples and use a pouce with it. Of course the quilt has to be the right color for the pouce to show. I have both the white and the blue. I like FullLineStencil.com. Their stencils are not cut but have a mesh that the chalk goes thru.

  18. #93
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    Patchwork pieces was great. I printed out several.
    Now if they would just come out with a product like carbon paper only it would have to wash out.
    I dont have a long arm with the laser to follow the design. I dont like using paper that you tear away. It has a tendency to wrinkle up.
    Come on industry and come up with a carbon paper for quilting.
    Maybe there is one, anybody know?

  19. #94
    Super Member Celeste's Avatar
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    Rose, I don't know for sure, but I seem to remember something like carbon paper that I had to use to mark the darts for sewing? Of course, that would be on the inside, so perhaps they didn't wash out?

  20. #95
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I still have some of that paper. Think I will test it out on a scrap of fabric.

  21. #96
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    EVERYONE.... great discussion. Thanks for all the hints.

    Judith

  22. #97
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    Well the first problem is you have to carbon the quilt before you sandwich it. Must be a hard surface. It didnt copy very well either without the wheel that comes with the colored paper cause you press hard and it rips the paper.
    Next I will wash it.

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