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Thread: How secure is Invisible Thread?

  1. #1
    Junior Member nantucketsue's Avatar
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    I ask this because although I have a reel of the reputable Superior Thread's invisible thread, I am reluctant to use it in a quilt that is going to be frequently washed because I fear it will not be as strong as regular cotton thread. What is the verdict of anyone who has used it. Would you use it in a baby quilt for instance?

  2. #2
    saf
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    Thanks for asking this question. A friend has suggested that I use invisible thread for my first effort at quilting as she says that any mistakes I make will be less visible. I am also wondering about any ironing problems or concerns.

  3. #3
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    I have read not to use it in baby quilts. The cut ends can poke. Also it can't be ironed with a hot iron. It will melt. That said, I love using it, just have to be careful where you use it.
    Sue

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    I am using invisible thread on my double wedding ring to secure the arcs. Let me tell you that trying to undo these stitches is like pulling teeth. I have ironed over the arcs/stitches and wet the fabric. It doesnot give at all. I am quite pleased with it.

  5. #5
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvsstuff
    I am using invisible thread on my double wedding ring to secure the arcs. Let me tell you that trying to undo these stitches is like pulling teeth. I have ironed over the arcs/stitches and wet the fabric. It doesnot give at all. I am quite pleased with it.
    What brand of monofilament are you using? And, yeah, I feel for you - unsewing those stitches is NOT fun at all.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Grammashel's Avatar
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    This brings up another question. I never iron a quilt after it's quilted, no matter what the thread. How many do iron them?

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    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
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    Be careful when you iron the thread, it does melt at some temperatures. Also does leave some pokeys. If you make charity quilts for hospitals and the likes, the heat of the dryers will melt the thread. Made my nephew a quilt for using while he was treated at St. Judes. Well after a few washing I had to make another quilt from other thread.

  8. #8

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    Only some of the threads melt. The newer threads are less likely to do so. One reason for not using it with kids is that it can get wrapped around a finger or toe, and you can't see it as well, so parents may not notice it in time.

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    Harriet Hargraves uses it in her machine quilting. But she is very specific about the brands she uses.

  10. #10
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
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    I like Superior MonoPoly and YLI mono. Both are made of polyester.

    You do have to watch using an iron because poly does have a low melt point. If you are using the Mono Nylon do not iron it at all.

    I do not use invisible on a quilt that is going to be used and washed a lot. It can become a bit stiff over time. Any brand will do that.

  11. #11
    Junior Member nantucketsue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashnquilt
    I like Superior MonoPoly and YLI mono. Both are made of polyester.

    You do have to watch using an iron because poly does have a low melt point. If you are using the Mono Nylon do not iron it at all.

    I do not use invisible on a quilt that is going to be used and washed a lot. It can become a bit stiff over time. Any brand will do that.
    I think that answers the question for all of us. Thank you. I will only use monofilament in projects that are unlikely to require washing.

  12. #12
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I hate the feel and look of invisible thread. I think it's a horrible product. My opinion!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashnquilt
    I like Superior MonoPoly and YLI mono. Both are made of polyester.
    You do have to watch using an iron because poly does have a low melt point. If you are using the Mono Nylon do not iron it at all.
    Thank you very much for the great information.

  14. #14
    Super Member Ripped on Scotch's Avatar
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    I have used it in a quilt... but I think if you match the thread well you don't see it either. I wouldn't use it for a baby quilt just because I find where the ends are it is scratchy and I wouldn't want to scratch the baby.

  15. #15
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    I literally went nuts trying to use this invisible thread. Finally gave up. It is almost impossible to thread the needle.

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    I have quilts more than 10 yrs old with invisible thread that have held up fine thru washing and drying. I used a cone of inv.thread from joanns

    As far as the use in baby quilts, the concern is that thread ends could wrap arourd a finger or toe and cut off circulation. if you're careful trimming it shouldn't be a problem. monofilament is/was used in a lot of childrens clothes. The only problem i've ever had was with a purchased sleeper, a thread did wrap around my DD's toe but no serious damage was done before we found it. Could happen with any thread really.

  17. #17
    Super Member BuzzinBumble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetana3
    Harriet Hargraves uses it in her machine quilting. But she is very specific about the brands she uses.
    Yes, and since she is one of the early pioneers in machine quilting, she knows what she is talking about. Her preferred favorite is Sew-Art International Invisible NYLON thread. She uses 3 ply cotton thread in the bobbin when quilting with it and it gives her quilting a hand stitched appearance. It has none of the problems found with other invisible threads and does not look like you have stitched your quilt with fishing line. No stiffness, poking, shiny stitches, melting...) She also writes that she has washed her quilts many many times and has not experienced any trouble with the thread cutting through the fabric.
    Here is a link that describes the brand:
    http://reviews.ebay.com/Invisible-Ny...00000004601095

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    I used the invisible thread on my Grandson's quilt to do applique because I knew it would be washed alot and was afraid that the fusible would lift.

    It has been washed repeatedly, holds up great, no problems.

  19. #19
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    Once upon a time I attempted to use it for something simple. I found that the brand I used was not strong at all and kept breaking in my sewing machine. I could very easily break it when wound around my fingers. Maybe that was 'user' problems and not my machine. However, the thread was expensive. So I've opted to not use it.

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    i have used invisible thread for many years, since Harriet Hargrave first recommended it in her first book. The monofilament on the market now is as thin as a hair, soft and doesn't poke at all, yet its very strong. I've ironed and dried my quilts at high temps and they all still look great-no melting or thread breakage

  21. #21
    Senior Member MIJul's Avatar
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    I use it only on smaller items and certainly not on baby quilts. (Those ends are "poke-y" as stated.) It's great for table runners, wallhangings, and other decorative items.

  22. #22
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    I use it sparingly.
    I hate using it because I seem to itch when I have something next to my body made with it. I alway's seem to find the "pokey" ends.
    I would never use it on baby things. Safety concern.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Sneed's Avatar
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    I only use it in wall hangings or quilts that are not going to be used or laundered a whole lot.

  24. #24
    Junior Member frannella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvsstuff View Post
    I am using invisible thread on my double wedding ring to secure the arcs. Let me tell you that trying to undo these stitches is like pulling teeth. I have ironed over the arcs/stitches and wet the fabric. It doesnot give at all. I am quite pleased with it.
    Is the thread you used so successfully nylon or poly? What about the consideration of "poking"? TIA
    I didn't make this beautiful GFG quilt but it's on my wish list to do

  25. #25
    Junior Member frannella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambiquilts View Post
    i have used invisible thread for many years, since Harriet Hargrave first recommended it in her first book. The monofilament on the market now is as thin as a hair, soft and doesn't poke at all, yet its very strong. I've ironed and dried my quilts at high temps and they all still look great-no melting or thread breakage
    Hi--Thanks for posting the results of your own experiences with invisible thread. Have you been using nylon or polyester thread and is there anything in your years of experience with invisible thread to suggest you SHOULDN'T use it in a baby quilt? Also, do you think it's better to use "clear" thread or the "smoke" thread with a really mixed bag of color and print changes ranging from white to medium to dark and from solids to prints?

    I am making a complicated baby quilt design that calls for grid-quilting straight through the design elements in the block (8-pointed stars with appliqued flower petals and centers on a white background). I would have to change threads every 1-4 inches across the length and width of a single grid line about 150 times to quilt the top in cotton threads or else stop the grid quilting every 6 inches in order to skip the design elements in each block before resuming the grid line stiching and then go back to finish the missing grid quilting in matching color threads (many fewer thread changes but still a total pain). Either route would try the patience of job. There are a couple of other routes I can come up with to avoid stitching through the stars and flowers, but invisible thread is an attractive solution.

    I have the time and am possibly stubborn and disciplined enough to pull off various cotton-thread alternatives routes, but if invisible threads work well and pose no risks to my godson, I think invisible thread would be the neater, better-looking option (and SO much easier). There're too many different colors (in light, medium, dark values) and patterns (solids, small and larger scale prints) in the stars and the flower petals & centers) to pick a single 'neutral' thread that wouldn't detract from the stars and flowers. Like you, I am totally persuaded by Harriet's stamp of approval of invisible thread and am only hesitating because I am making a baby quilt.

    Thank you again.
    I didn't make this beautiful GFG quilt but it's on my wish list to do

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