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Thread: how to use a pigma pen

  1. #1
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    how to use a pigma pen

    I have a pigma pen and freezer paper. I know I need to iron on my freezer paper and remove paper after wrote on. Can anyone please tell me the steps from blank paper to aping freezer paper, to writing and ending with removal of paper.


    I greatly apreciate it!

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I think you already know the process. Try a few samples to make sure it works for you.

    Basically you iron freezer paper to the wrong side of fabric; this stabilizes the fabric, making it easier to write. You can use a hot setting on the iron, but it does not take much time with the iron to get the freezer paper to stick. Write with the Pigma pen on the fabric. (Note: the size of the Pigma pen will affect how it looks.) Peel off the freezer paper. (If you leave a corner un-ironed, you can use that to start the peeling.)

    This website provides an idea of how different pens look after washing and drying the fabric:
    http://www.freckledwhimsy.com/2010/0...ns-to-use.html

    Edit: When ironing the freezer paper to the wrong side of the fabric, make sure the slippery side of the freezer paper is against the fabric; the "paper" side of the freezer paper should be next to the iron. If you don't pay attention to this, you may end up having to clean plastic off your iron!

  3. #3
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I always just iron the freezer paper to the back of the fabric to have a firm surface to write on and then peel it off when done.
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  4. #4
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    Thank you! I was told on this forum about the paper holding the material better and my local quilt shop told me not to use the paper. But if so many quilter in this forum recomended it, then I think its a god idea to listen. I just forgot the process and wanTed to makesure. Thank you again!

  5. #5
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Remember to iron the shiny side of the freezer paper to the fabric. Takes just a few seconds. DO NOT USE STEAM.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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  6. #6
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    You need to consider your seam allowances too. If this is for a bunch of people to use I would suggest you make a template folder out of card stock with the seam allowances as a frame to slip your fabric into otherwise people will write all the way to the edge and you'll lose some when you sew the squares together.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by citruscountyquilter View Post
    You need to consider your seam allowances too. If this is for a bunch of people to use I would suggest you make a template folder out of card stock with the seam allowances as a frame to slip your fabric into otherwise people will write all the way to the edge and you'll lose some when you sew the squares together.
    What works really well for many people signing quilt squares is sandpaper.
    Open up a manilla folder and attach very fine sandpaper to the inside.
    Cut a hole in the cover the size you want your squares to be. Draw a square this size onto the sandpaper and then another larger square around that for seam allowance. At least a half inch. A full inch extra would be better.
    Provide fabric squares in the size of the finished square plus seam allowance.
    People open the folder, lay their fabric onto the marked square, close the top and write on the fabric that shows in that hole.
    Last edited by maviskw; 12-20-2014 at 06:06 AM.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  8. #8
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirl89 View Post
    Thank you! I was told on this forum about the paper holding the material better and my local quilt shop told me not to use the paper. But if so many quilter in this forum recommended it, then I think its a god idea to listen. I just forgot the process and wanted to make sure. Thank you again!
    What did your LQS tell you to use?? Be sure to mark seam allowance because there is always someone who will write in the seam allowance
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  9. #9
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I do the same as described above, but only on WASHED fabric. If you don't wash the fabric first you can end up with faded looking labels. IMHO
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

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