Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 33 of 33

Thread: I have the Longarm Learning Blues!

  1. #26
    Senior Member PlanoDebbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Plano, TX
    Posts
    447
    I'm also new to using a Longarm, and I have also spent many hours using a seam ripper. If the loopies are on the bottom, it's your upper tension that's messed up. For me, I discovered that I hadn't put the tension bar down regularly. If you can easily pull your thread through your needle when you are ready to sew, you're gonna have a problem. Tension bar UP while threading the machine, then put it down. If you're thread still pulls through the needle without any resistance, you don't have any tension on the top at all. Also, try turning your tension wheel clock-wise a half turn to see if that helps.

    I was so frustrated the first time I used my machine, that I refused to even look at it for 2 months. I was so afraid that I had just wasted $6000 on an over-sized paper weight. Once I finally figured out all of my tension and threading issues, I can happily report that I have now completed 8 quilts on my machine!

    Good luck!

  2. #27
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,646
    Blog Entries
    1
    got out some tools and moved my thread holder up a little closer to the machine. I think I solved the problem of the laser light disappearing. Only time will tell. I also figured out that I had missed a place when rethreading. Gonna try again!!
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.
    Find me on Facebook Be my friend Join my group
    Leesa Kemp's Material Things Fabric Sales and Auctions

  3. #28
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,646
    Blog Entries
    1
    I am happy to say that I am doing much better. I'm getting plenty of practice.
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.
    Find me on Facebook Be my friend Join my group
    Leesa Kemp's Material Things Fabric Sales and Auctions

  4. #29
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crosby,Texas
    Posts
    838
    Good deal #1! Just keep plugging away and pretty soon you'll be doing it!

  5. #30
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Littlefield, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,088
    I use the basting down of the batting at the top to test stitches...I don't use a mirror...what I do is run my fingernail along the stitches on the underside of the quilt...if you feel a tut, tut, tut as you go along...then it's time to unpin (I unzip) the backing at the takeup bar a little ways, and check the stitches.

    Wonder how many folks get a class in using their machines? I didn't, had to teach myself. Thinking about offering some classes here (in my home) for those interested in learning about longarm quilting...from preparing to finishing the quilt on a longarm...and one on maintenence.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  6. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sparks, Nevada
    Posts
    72
    Mine is a Nolting and requires a warm up also. I have a regular hand mirror and a hanging LED light that I use to check the back. I'm too old to be crawling under there...if I did, I'd have to call the fire department to extricate me! If you have a store locally that sells parts for appliance repair, check there for great lights and good prices. Those repair guys have to see into small places and they have some great products.
    Linda in Nevada

  7. #32
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,509
    So sorry that happened to you. But it has happened to all of us. I usd to get down underneath my machine to check stitches, but now that area is used for storage, so now I use a light and a hand held mirror, held at an angle close to the stitching, as someone else said. One other thing I do to help me see, which has not been mentioned yet, is to raise the take up bar to the fullest height. That really makes it easy to see from the back of the machine. Just be sure to remember to lower it again before you continue quilting (another mistake I've made). I think we all make every mistake there is to make. I know I do. Some of them more than once.

  8. #33
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    La Pine Oregon, USA
    Posts
    5,911
    Been there, done that! Too many times to count! I have learned to ALWAYS, after quilting a few inches, to reach underneath and FEEL the stitching. You will feel when the tension is bad. And eventually, you'll learn the sound it makes when the bobbin is making a big mess. Sorry it happened to you. Don't know if you got it frogged yet, but if you haven't, roll the quilt and go around the back to frog.........it really is easy when you've really screwed up. BTW -- LOVE the song!
    Dee


    "A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing." by George Bernard Shaw

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.