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Thread: I need some serger help.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Gilla's Avatar
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    I've been making a bunch of pillow cases for my grandkids and also for a Craft Show. I have never figured out how to finish off the end of a serged seam. I gotta do something or it will unraffle, but what? I have been going in with needle and thread and sew a few stitches to seal it. Not to mention I just broke my sewing machine needle trying to do it by sewing machine.
    Is there a better way?
    Gilla

  2. #2
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    Make the threads long and tie a knot, or take a needle and run the end of the threads back up the seam, or you can cut off the end and use some "NO FRAY" or 'FRAY CHECK" on it.
    For pillow cases, I usually just tie a knot as close to the end of the seam as I can get, using a stiletto, or a pin and push it down.

  3. #3
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    there is also the hidden seams method of sewing the pillowcases together. will get the link for you. it is a video tut I found. I can't seem to find it. I must not have saved the site. Stupid me. Now I wont remember how to do it. good luck. though

  4. #4
    Super Member lovequilts's Avatar
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    I do French seams on my pillow cases. No raw edges show. Or user Fray Check on the tread ends.

  5. #5
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    Fray check...it works great.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Pat M.'s Avatar
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    There is a little hook tool/loop turner that I use to weave the thread back into the serger seam. You can buy one at a JoAnns store.

  7. #7
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    sahm4605 . It is called a french seam. Sew seam on the right side of the fabric first then sew on the wrong side. This encloses the cut edge of the seam

  8. #8
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    This is a great way to make pillowcases with the sausage or tube method.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLnrC9yo8tY

  9. #9
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karen65ae
    sahm4605 . It is called a french seam. Sew seam on the right side of the fabric first then sew on the wrong side. This encloses the cut edge of the seam
    that is what I thought it was called. but couldn't be sure.

  10. #10
    Super Member tuesy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grama Lehr
    Make the threads long and tie a knot, or take a needle and run the end of the threads back up the seam, or you can cut off the end and use some "NO FRAY" or 'FRAY CHECK" on it.
    For pillow cases, I usually just tie a knot as close to the end of the seam as I can get, using a stiletto, or a pin and push it down.
    This is what I do too.

  11. #11
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilla
    I've been making a bunch of pillow cases for my grandkids and also for a Craft Show. I have never figured out how to finish off the end of a serged seam. I gotta do something or it will unraffle, but what? I have been going in with needle and thread and sew a few stitches to seal it. Not to mention I just broke my sewing machine needle trying to do it by sewing machine.
    Is there a better way?
    Gilla
    Here is the best way and easiest way. Get some floss threaders from your dentist next time you go (they're free there). Then when you finish serging your seam, leave about a 6" tail. Stick the end in the loop of your floss threader, then take the pointy end and thread it through the stitches you just made for a couple inches. Then snip off the excess threads. Voila, hidden thread ends. If you can't picture this I will make a tutorial for you.

  12. #12
    Super Member happymrs's Avatar
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    I am thinking, if you get to the end of your fabric, your seam, if you turn it around, & start it right back in, & go back serging about an inch or so, then just sew of the edge to end it, that's like backstitching a seam on a serger. I have done this on garments made alot! Hope this helps!

  13. #13
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happymrs
    I am thinking, if you get to the end of your fabric, your seam, if you turn it around, & start it right back in, & go back serging about an inch or so, then just sew of the edge to end it, that's like backstitching a seam on a serger. I have done this on garments made alot! Hope this helps!
    You can do that, but these ends are still the ones that will unravel eventually. Still works better to enclose them in the stitching. Thats the way I start stitching; by starting a couple inches up the seam, sew down to the end and then reverse my seam to go back up from the start of the sleeve or shirt bottom.

  14. #14
    Super Member azwendyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilla
    I've been making a bunch of pillow cases for my grandkids and also for a Craft Show. I have never figured out how to finish off the end of a serged seam. I gotta do something or it will unraffle, but what? I have been going in with needle and thread and sew a few stitches to seal it. Not to mention I just broke my sewing machine needle trying to do it by sewing machine.
    Is there a better way?
    Gilla
    When I got my new serger a few years ago, I learned something in the "get to know you machine" class that might help you.

    Let's see if I can explain:

    1. Take just a few stitches past the end of your seam.
    2. Lift the presser foot.
    3. Without pulling out a lot of thread, flip the piece around and place it under the presser foot, positioning it so that you will be sewing back down the same seam in the oposite direction. Be sure you angle the work piece a little so that the cutter does not cut the orriginal seam.
    4. Stitch several stitches, gradually running it off the side.
    5. Clip the threads and you're done.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Gilla's Avatar
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    Thanks, everyone. You have some good solutions. I've tried the Easy Fray as I had still some from way back, and I also want to try the stitching back.

    Next pillow cases I'll I will use French seams. Looks better.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Calico Grammy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    This is a great way to make pillowcases with the sausage or tube method.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLnrC9yo8tY
    This is a great video! Thanks so much for sharing!

  17. #17
    Super Member AnnaK's Avatar
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    Hapymis, this is what I learned in my class too. It's like double stitching the serging, then I add Fray Check to it also. It's always worked.

  18. #18
    Junior Member SueN's Avatar
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    This is basicallly what I do, except I use a large needle to pull it back thru

  19. #19
    Senior Member hevemi's Avatar
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    Use a small size crochet hook or a darning/embroidery needle (dull point) to thread those ends back into the seam. Works fine, just make sure to leave the thread tails long enough, 4-5" and pull them straigth between your fingers first for easier working.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    I always chain off a long thread at the end. Then I get a wide eyed needle and thread the end back under the overlocking so that the ends sit inside the stitches of the seam. - Sorry, did not see the post above before I rattled off - the diagram is how I do it.

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