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Thread: Large stipling ... bad

  1. #1
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Large stipling ... bad

    I made a quilt recently that had large appliqued letters on it. I wanted the applique to stand out, and I also wanted to finish the quilt fast - so I opted for a large stipple on the background.

    The first time I stippled it was on a 2" border so it was smallish and I took to stippling like a duck to water. Since then I've also done some pieces with micro-stippling and again ... like a duck. It was sooooo easy.

    Large stippling kicked my BUTT!! I had more problems moving the quilt around (domestic machine), and I had so many thread breaks because my hand motion was too fast for my machine speed. I just could not get the hang of large stippling to save my life.

    One would think by looking at it that large stippling is easier and faster than small or medium stippling ... and perhaps it is on a long arm.

    Am I alone in this?
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  2. #2
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    No, you are not alone. I usually quilt my quilts block by block, but I wanted a large allover stipple on my Jewel Box. I had trouble knowing where I was on the quilt and moving it in a smooth fashion. I finally had to mentally do it in large blocks and keep telling myself 'large puzzle pieces' so I wouldn't get myself quilted into a place I couldn't get out.

  3. #3
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    My theory is we all have a comfort level when it comes to size of stippling -- a point where it "just feels right" and is easy to do. When we alter the size we are less able to get a good result without alot of concentration....kind of like trying to drive a big sedan when you are used to a Mini-Cooper!

  4. #4
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    I had a hard time doing the same...I had numerous thread breaks. I couldn't handle the large motions without a problem, either. I did change my thread to a 100% cotton from Connecting Threads and the breakage stopped...not sure if it was the thread or me.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  5. #5
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    This might help - makes sense to me - but I don't know how to FMQ

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/tutoria...g-t177072.html

  6. #6
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    I have trouble with large stippling/meandering too. I find it hard to keep the paths smooth and rounded without any boo boos. I seem to do better with a large loop de loop because I can stop to reposition my hands where the thread crosses the loop and have a smoother end product. I do great on a small or medium because I can do a nice section before I have to reposition my hands.

  7. #7
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I didn't have a problem with "where" to stipple (ie direction), it was just the mechanics of doing it. The larger pattern requires a larger movement of the quilt which I found difficult to constantly adjust and the larger movement combined with my machine speed was not matched - hence the thread breakage. I did have better luck when I increased my machine speed, but I still had some breaks.

    I was also using a lighter weight thread (Aurifil 50 wt). In hindsight I may have better off with a 30 wt. I later discovered a spool of blue variegated 30wt that would have been perfect.

    I'll have to do some practicing of larger stippling ... see if I can find a better machine/hand speed combined with a heavier thread that will work.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  8. #8
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    Have you seen this quilting frame? I ordered one and expect it to arrive next week. I think it looks like a great way to quilt.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbTgcGmQ9PY

    Ken sells the quilt frames and here is his information.

    http://machine-quilt-frames.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nygal View Post
    Have you seen this quilting frame? I ordered one and expect it to arrive next week. I think it looks like a great way to quilt.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbTgcGmQ9PY

    Ken sells the quilt frames and here is his information.

    http://machine-quilt-frames.blogspot.com/
    I have ... I even tried it in Paducah last year. Not sure I liked the feel of moving the machine instead of the quilt. It was different.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I do a fairly large stipple. I pick a size area I'm comfortable working in and go to the bottom. Start back up at the beginning and go ddown, aver and over. I usually divide my quilt into 4ths and do a 1/4 at a time. If I block my quilt so it doesn't fall off dining table, I can go back up, what I call going backwards. Maybe this will help you.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  11. #11
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    Similar to the John Flynn one I ordered and never did use.

  12. #12
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    I was inspired to make something similar to this after seeing the videos and his website. I have a long hand-quilting frame, that I thought would be perfect to try to "make my own" with. I haven't aquired a table that large yet. But I did make the part that the machine sits on. I used shelving that I had (removed a shelf from a little table so the cat could make herself at home lol) and bought two 3-wheel casters from hardware store. They were $3-4 each and screwed them in the bottom of the shelving. I glued the big stir sticks (they give away to stir paint with) to the side of the shelving for handles. Most of what I have in it was free ($7-8 for the casters only), but even if you had to buy from scratch, it would be another $5 for the shelf and since you have to buy the lumber and table for his frame anyway...
    Obvs, mine doesn't have knobs, you just roll it and put it back in the slot for the frame. But for $15 vs $160... And I haven't actually tried it, so I can't give it a real review yet..

    Quote Originally Posted by nygal View Post
    Have you seen this quilting frame? I ordered one and expect it to arrive next week. I think it looks like a great way to quilt.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbTgcGmQ9PY

    Ken sells the quilt frames and here is his information.

    http://machine-quilt-frames.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
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    There is a different motion to doing large stippling vs small. As said above one must think big and have a broader view of the area to be quilted. There are quilting stencils of the larger meandering/stippling designs that help. At least there is a size that can be held to until your hands and mind find their rhythm for the larger areas.

  14. #14
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
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    I love my quilt frAme. Frustration with fmq on a sit-doen machine is lessened.

  15. #15
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
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    My spelling! So sorry about that.

  16. #16
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I never tried it, maybe someday!
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  17. #17
    Senior Member Grannyh67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nygal View Post
    Have you seen this quilting frame? I ordered one and expect it to arrive next week. I think it looks like a great way to quilt.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbTgcGmQ9PY

    Ken sells the quilt frames and here is his information.

    http://machine-quilt-frames.blogspot.com/
    mygal, please let us know if you like it. I might order me one too. Let me know if it goes together easy. Sounds like a deal to me and so much easier than trying to do it FH on my machine. Joy
    Life is SEW great!!!!!!

  18. #18
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    I have ... I even tried it in Paducah last year. Not sure I liked the feel of moving the machine instead of the quilt. It was different.
    I have seen that one too.if you do not have a large work room or the money for a long arm-it is a great alternative.I prefer moving the machine versus moving the fabric.In my opinion it is more natural.like drawing with a pen and moving the pen versus moving the paper.
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  19. #19
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    two tips have helped my fmq with an all over design--put the bulk of the quilt to the back of the machine and move it forward as you quilt so you can actually see the design as you work; and instead of the same type of stippling I do on smaller spaces, I use a loopty loop---basically meandering circles--practice first drawing it and be able to draw the circle from both directions before you start sewing.

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