Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Learning about grain - the hard way >

Learning about grain - the hard way

Learning about grain - the hard way

Old 09-02-2018, 02:22 PM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
heron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 41
Default Learning about grain - the hard way

It's not like I don't know about grain, having made garments for several decades. But, well, this is quilting, and that's different.

I just made a 3 strip border for my current quilt top. The inner strip (to be sewn to the assembled blocks) measures 2" finished. The strip outside of that measures 0.5" finished. The outermost strip measures 8.5 finished.

Trying to be frugal, I cut the skinny middle strip on the cross grain. I cut the wide outer strip on the straight grain. I used the IDT on my Pfaff Passport to sew the two together. What would you expect to happen?

Well, I expected the IDT to just make it all right. Nope.

For those more experienced that I am, do you think this ugliness truly is the grain issue I just described? If not, I'm open to suggestions.

waveygravey-3-.jpg
heron is offline  
Old 09-02-2018, 02:59 PM
  #2  
Power Poster
 
sewbizgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 21,418
Default

Looks like the outer border was too long... maybe because the outer edge of the blue strip stretched, if it was cut on the bias? I'd cut the black border exactly the same length as the white border, and ease it onto the blue piece.
sewbizgirl is online now  
Old 09-02-2018, 03:53 PM
  #3  
Super Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Sunny Florida
Posts: 3,353
Default

Take the black border off.

Starch well and press the black border. Sew a line of stay stitching down each side of black border. I use 2.0 stitch length and sew inside of a 1/4 inch seam. It won't show when you attach the borders.

After the stay stitching, press again. This second pressing flattens the fabric.

Remeasure the border length needed. Cut to exact measurement. Mark the border at half point. Mark the quilt border at the half point. Pin these two together. Mark and pin at the quarter points on each piece. Don't be stingy with the pin process. I pin about every 4-6 inches along the border. It's just a little work for a better result.

Best wishes and good luck for flat borders!
Rhonda K is offline  
Old 09-02-2018, 04:40 PM
  #4  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 12,930
Default

Did you measure your quilt through the middle before each border, then cut each border to that measurement? I do think the skinny border stretched, but I don't think it would have mattered if you had measured through the middle after adding that border, then cut your last border to that measurement and eased it to fit. The problem in the photo is most often caused by just sewing border fabric on without pre-measuring and pre-cutting to fit.
Prism99 is offline  
Old 09-02-2018, 04:42 PM
  #5  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 12,930
Default

Did you measure your quilt through the middle before each border, then cut each border to that measurement? I do think the skinny border stretched, but I don't think it would have mattered if you had measured through the middle after adding that border, then cut your last border to that measurement and eased it to fit. The problem in the photo is most often caused by just sewing border fabric on without pre-measuring and pre-cutting to fit.

Edit: Heavily starching the fabric before cutting would have helped the skinny border stay unstretched while you sewed.

Oops! Sorry for the double post.
Prism99 is offline  
Old 09-02-2018, 05:27 PM
  #6  
Power Poster
 
nativetexan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: home again, after 27 yrs!
Posts: 19,388
Default

I just ripped off some borders that i had cut the length of fabric. everything went well until the last one of course. I will never do that again. i had even starched the strips.
nativetexan is offline  
Old 09-02-2018, 06:00 PM
  #7  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 16,880
Default

Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
I just ripped off some borders that i had cut the length of fabric. everything went well until the last one of course. I will never do that again. i had even starched the strips.
I'll console you on this ... With all the quilts I have made, the only one that I had borders waving back at me was when I cut LOF. I thought I was being so smart, so it would look really nice without seams. It was a challenge, but eventually I got the border laying flat.

And have gone back to doing my borders only with WOF, and joining on the bias .... no problems!!
QuiltE is online now  
Old 09-02-2018, 06:36 PM
  #8  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Deep South near Cajun Country, USA
Posts: 4,538
Default

I cut my fabric for borders as LOF if at all possible. I don't like them stretchy. When I sew them on, I cut to length, then I do pin at the half, then each quarter point. Then I pin in the center of the spaces between those two pins. If I see that the bottom is pulling too much, I hold the two fabrics together and make the feed dogs pull evenly. None of my sewing machines have an even feed foot. I have never had the borders stretch and wave when I do it like this. I do the same procedure for WOF cuts, but am not as successful. I like the idea of stay stitching the fabric if the borders are cut WOF. I will try that the next time.
Barb in Louisiana is offline  
Old 09-03-2018, 03:48 AM
  #9  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Norfolk, VA
Posts: 5,397
Default

My daughter and I both learned our lesson (which I knew but wasn't thinking) about the grain on my AccuQuilt, at different times. I couldn't figure out why some of my squares were the correct size and others were smaller. It took me a while to realize it was the way I laid them on the cutter, with the grain going the wrong way and you roll it thru the cutter it stretches the fabric while cutting and then it goes back once cut. My daughters experience was about the same thing, she's new to sewing and only does block quilts but knows this lesson. Its better than the first time she made a quilt, she cut out a square, then held in the fabric in her hands while cutting the rest of the squares, to say she had a lot of uneven squares was an understatement. But she learned her lesson and it took some work but I finally got it all to work out. We all have to learn and some times be reminded again on things when it comes to sewing and life
romanojg is offline  
Old 09-03-2018, 03:51 AM
  #10  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Heart of Colorado's majestic mountains!
Posts: 6,026
Default

Grain is very important! So is pinning the sections to fit. I like LWG borders whenever possible. Another truth is that you will have that stretch if the quality of the fabric (thread count) is vastly different. I personally am not a heavy starch advocate because, after you wash the quilt, the fabric reverts to original structure plus the shrinkage factor. Measuring in the centers, accurate cutting and careful pinning at measured intervals is essential.
quilterpurpledog is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
heron
Main
9
08-24-2018 08:30 AM
homebody323
General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
13
12-29-2012 08:44 PM
joyce888
Main
15
05-28-2012 04:32 PM
craftybear
Links and Resources
2
08-27-2011 11:58 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.