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Thread: The little sewing machine that could.... or not

  1. #26

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    52
    Especially for quilting - a Janome 6500 - a real work horse with many great features!

  2. #27

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missouri
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    1,844
    I started out w/a Janome 3200 for $299....then upgraded due to the short throat space...and, yes, I was quilting in it anyhow! I upgraded to the Janome 6600 for $1,600. I love both and use both still all the time. I have friends that come over and sew and use the one I am not. Both go thru much and go thru it w/style:))Here's something to consider...I think we are thrifty and sometimes too thrifty of people. We will settle for less to be thrifty. This is not the place to settle for less! I always tell my dh...more power-more power!! :)Go into sites like Janome.com and put in the search exactly what you are wanting a machine for. Look at your options. I know service is important to some, but, am here to tell you I have so far done all my own servicing w/o a person to do it for me. (which is seriously oiling and cleaning only-they are work horses!) So, that is something to consider either way. No sense in paying a small change here when you will spend the bigger amount later then you spent more money in the long run:))LOL W/my 6600 I wanted to sew fassssster and have the bigger throat opening for quilts. Will prob put this on a quilt frame some day and then piece w/my smaller Janome as not to have to keep moving things back and forth. You can get an embrod machine/sewing all in one...it just doesn't stop there!:))LOL Keep us posted! Skeat

  3. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    32
    I agree with Sara. My husband gave me a D1 Viking for my 40th Birthday. I really do love it, but for the money I would have purchased a Bernina. I find the Bernina dealers have more classes and support overall. The Viking staff seems only want to sell machines. Very little classes not related to the Viking machines. Test drive your machine and make sure you have a good dealer behind it to support you and the machine. It is a big investment and you should have something that everytime you sit down to sew, you can do exactly that!

  4. #29
    Super Member lass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,165
    I had my aunt's viking, but when it became difficult to get parts I bought a new one - a Sapphire 830. I love it. Has two lights a large opening and other things. I probably would have gotten the more expensive one if I had thought about more. But I needed to sew, sew, sew and after over a month of looking decided on that one.

  5. #30
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
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    Oct 2008
    Posts
    761
    Had this problem with my mom's old machine (which I was given after she got a newer one). Oh, the problems it game me....

    My DH gave me hard time about wanting a new machine. But I reminded him of all the higher end tools for the wood shop that we bought over the years. (You know -- this one does this BUT this one does all that and MORE) He says it was a guilt trip. Have a Pfaff now and LOVE it. Hoping to upgrade to a higher end in the future - higher ends have a wider stitch width and so much more fun stuff... :-)

  6. #31
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida
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    17,283
    you got lots of great advice here, but I thought what Mary said about going to the website and looking over the machines and their features was a very good idea.
    Also, do yourself a favor: don't be manipulated by a salesperson, and for pete's sake, (cause there are plenty out there), don't just watch one of them sew on machine, showing you this thing it does, and that thing it does. Take your OWN FABRIC from home and SEW ON IT YOURSELF and take all the time you need.
    Make a list of features, here's an example:
    *How high does the pressure foot go...how much thickness will it accomodate?
    *Can I control the speed of the machine...something i never want to be without again.
    *Does it have a drop in bobbin?
    *Is it easy to thread?
    *How convenient will it be to have serviced? What does a typical servicing cost?
    *How much do accessories cost?
    *What do consumers say about it? (Consumer Reports.com)
    *Look at the manual before buying. Is it user friendly?
    *Does it have needle up or needle down feature? very handy thing to have!
    *And of course, how wide is the throat space?
    These are just examples of features I would consider. I have a Janome QC6260 and have been pleased but would like to upgrade one day or maybe even try out a Bernina. If you feel pressured or unsure, go home. breathe. It will be there later if you want it. I don't like that most stores have no price tags and dealer doesn't tell you until they have been showing it to you for a while. They know you are excited and not thinking your clearest. Ask up front, how much is this one? If they start jabbering about features...ask again, until you get an answer. :wink: I wish you the best, it's a big step, bc we have them for years. :D

  7. #32
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Jan 2008
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    Florida
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    P.S. take a good level-headed friend with you to help you think and so you will feel comfortable. :-)

  8. #33
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
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    6,763
    Quote Originally Posted by rubia
    I wanted to sew. I had limited resources. I purchased a machine from someone on Craigslist. My expectations were that I'd make a few dresses a year for my daughter, maybe a couple other things, but that was it. Then I realized I like quilting. Trying to sew the thickness of quilts knocks my needle out of alignment and each time I take the machine in for a once-over, it's $90. I might as well buy a new machine for the amount these tune-ups are costing me!

    I have a Brother CS 100. The little sewing machine that thought it could. LOL

    Am I asking too much of my machine?

    Also, once my husband graduates in May and gets a good job, I want to upgrade. What machine would you recommend?
    I have a little White "school sewing machine." (I think they're advertised this way because they are the ones that are used in the schools.) It's one of those that you see advertised yearly at the sewing machine shops. I paid mine 149 about 15 years ago. It's a work horse. Doesn't have many bells and whistles, but it's a sturdy machine. It has 3 stitch lengths, 3 zig zags, a buttonhole feature, a blind hem stitch, and a couple of stretch stitches. It makes a beautiful stitch. I recently used it to make a quilt -- machine quilted and all. I've used it in classes that I taught (the students used it). It's the machine I pull out when my Janome is in the shop.

    You don't have to spend a lot of money to but a strong dependable machine. Shop around and talk to the people in the shop to see what machines come in for repairs the least. My "sewing machine man" is very trustworthy and has always given me good advice.

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